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(CBS News)   SAT scores continue to slip. Well good, it's not like they're finding jobs after college anyway   (cbsnews.com) divider line 27
    More: Sad, SAT Scores, high schools, MoneyWatch, College Board  
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2362 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Sep 2013 at 11:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-09-26 11:43:03 AM  
4 votes:
Headline: "High School Student's SAT Scores Continue to Slip"

FTA:

"High school seniors who graduated earlier this year generated the exact same scores as last year's crop of test takers."

"Continue" and "slip" - what do they MEAN?
2013-09-26 11:30:36 AM  
4 votes:
Get comfy for the long haul, folks. The Tea Party ain't going anywhere.
2013-09-26 11:01:56 AM  
4 votes:
The kids are just dumbing down in preparation for their stellar careers in food service, sanitation engineering, and as Wal-mart workers. It's better not to think about it too much. Very smart of them.
2013-09-26 11:41:48 AM  
3 votes:
So much for the Flynn effect.  Really, I think rising social inequality is behind this, two incomes, no free time, no budget for extra educational resources.  We're racing towards third world now, and the proposed solutions from half the country will just push us there faster.
2013-09-26 12:47:33 PM  
2 votes:

Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.


A problem requiring conversion between three different unit systems (inches, root acres, cube root gallons) would require most career engineers to pull out a unit table (or Google the units) or running through an intermediate conversion requiring specialized knowledge (usually the density of water). Or, for a particular sarcastic engineer, they'd tell you it's one acre*inch and to do the trivial unit conversion yourself.

I would venture that he did in fact know  how to solve the problem, volume calculation not being rocket science, and you were just being a douche and not allowing him the tools a normal person uses to solve it.

//It's also worth pointing out that gallons are not how rain flow or runoff are measured in the real world, primarily because that would be immensely stupid.  Cubic yards or meters have been standard since like the 1800s.
2013-09-26 11:58:45 AM  
2 votes:
It seems like the results may be skewed lower because more kids are taking the SAT than might have in previous years. The "everyone must go to college" mentality.
2013-09-26 11:45:54 AM  
2 votes:
SAT and IQ scores are meant for the consumption of nerds, by nerds.
2013-09-26 11:45:38 AM  
2 votes:
They'll rescale the scoring again in a few years. Back in my day, a 1300 meant something.
2013-09-26 10:22:27 AM  
2 votes:
SAT scores are normalized against performance anyway, so just change the grading scale like they've done several times before.

Problem solved.
2013-09-26 08:31:02 PM  
1 votes:
This is what "conservatives" wanted. Fewer kids going to college means a cheaper labor pool which lacks those pesky critical thinking skills that employers and politicians don't want to see in the riffraff anyway.
2013-09-26 03:01:35 PM  
1 votes:

PrivateCaboose: enik: PrivateCaboose: enik: doyner: Get comfy for the long haul, folks. The Tea Party ain't going anywhere.

Why yes, when I think teachers unions and public schools, I think Tea Party. Good observation.

I think he means: kids aren't getting any smarter, so we're in for more dumb leadership even with the next generation.

I would think that one would perhaps look at the mechanism responsible for helping make kids smarter. I'm not a Tea Party person, but I think we need to blame shiatty family structure and lousy schools before we blame a minor political party.

Sigh you are still missing it.

Dumb kids become dumb adults.
Dumb adults join Tea Party.
Tea Party stays alive for the long haul.

Have we painted a simple enough picture?


I'm a member of 'a' (there's no 'the') Tea Party and I'm pretty damned smart, and the Tea Partiers I've met appear to be more intelligent than the population as a whole. The dumb ones tend to remain checked out and sit on their asses, not join political groups and raise hell about things.
2013-09-26 01:00:32 PM  
1 votes:

Dr. Kefarkian: Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.

I'll take, "Who the fark cares?" for 600, Alex


I was thinking that's what Pick's nephew was thinking.  I know when I was 17 and my uncle came up to me and asked my that question, I'd just say, "fark if I know. Do you own god damned homework".
2013-09-26 12:54:13 PM  
1 votes:
"High school students' SAT scores continue to slip"
 
"High school seniors who graduated earlier this year generated the exact same scores as last year's crop of test takers."

"Headline writers at CBS Money Watch fail reading comprehension."

Actually, an important thing to look at is how many students take the tests.  Some states make pretty much anyone who can hold a pencil (or use a writing implement with an assistive device) take the test.  Some states let the dumb kids sit it out.  There has been a push, in general, to get more kids taking the test, which will tend to keep the scores flat even if education improves as a whole.  (In Maine, 90% of the students take the test, in Iowa it's 3%.  Some states, as policy, discourage anyone who might tank their scores from taking them.  It gives the schools the ability to boast about their SAT scores without actually educating their kids.  

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d10/tables/dt10_154.asp
2013-09-26 12:50:26 PM  
1 votes:
Remember when the US had a Top 5 in the world educational system?  Remember in the '80's when people started saying our educational system could be improved by privatization through charter schools, voucher programs and competition?  When are the people who pushed for privatization of our school step forward and admit they failed?
2013-09-26 12:38:30 PM  
1 votes:

Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.


That's not a mathematical question. It's a question that tests your knowledge of units. I don't know off the top of my head what the area of an acre is. If I did it would be trivially easy to calculate how many cubic feet of water we're dealing with.  I also don't know off the top of my head how many cubic feet of water compose a gallon.  But again, if I knew that, it would be trivially easy to calculate how many gallons fell on your acre.

So in actuality, you're complaining that your nephew has a poor knowledge of units of measure. Surprisingly, that's not something that's generally taught.  Though, I agree that it probably should be.
2013-09-26 12:23:59 PM  
1 votes:

GodComplex: ikanreed: So much for the Flynn effect.  Really, I think rising social inequality is behind this, two incomes, no free time, no budget for extra educational resources.  We're racing towards third world now, and the proposed solutions from half the country will just push us there faster.

I believe the Flynn Effect just state that IQ needs to be re-evaluated every 10 years, when the average IQ may increase about 3 points. Course it could be that more kids are taking the SATs which could skew the results.


Came here to say this. More kids are going to college than ever, so more kids take the SATs.

As a complete side note, you'd think it would be easy to get estimates of high-school graduation rates to back something like this up, but:

High School Graduation Rate Hits 40-Year Peak in the U.S.
...
Data reported for the 2010-11 academic year marks the first time all of the states used a uniform measure to calculate graduation rates

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/06/high-school-grad ua tion-rate-hits-40-year-peak-in-the-us/276604/
2013-09-26 12:18:53 PM  
1 votes:

Dr. Kefarkian: Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.

I'll take, "Who the fark cares?" for 600, Alex


I'll take, "what the fark is an acre again, and isn't that as variable as "leagues" or "hands"?

Then I would try and fail to remember the volume of a gallon in any linear measurement value at all.

Then I'd say, "use metric you bumblefark bumpkin!"
2013-09-26 12:13:59 PM  
1 votes:

Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.


I'll take, "Who the fark cares?" for 600, Alex
2013-09-26 12:10:01 PM  
1 votes:

Uranus Is Huge!: They'll rescale the scoring again in a few years. Back in my day, a 1300 meant something.


In my day 1350 meant something.

/it meant i took it twice and added the scores together.
2013-09-26 12:08:02 PM  
1 votes:

Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.


...so he pulled out his glock and popped a cap in your smarty-art ass?
2013-09-26 12:07:11 PM  
1 votes:

Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.


In high school level physics, they gloss over just enough unit cancellation to get the snowflakes to pass the test. The first time I saw this question was in college (12-ish years ago)... We got it the other way around, even the students who understood the concept struggled to figure out breaking a volume into and area and distance.
2013-09-26 12:07:08 PM  
1 votes:

lamecomedian: Headline: "High School Student's SAT Scores Continue to Slip"

FTA:

"High school seniors who graduated earlier this year generated the exact same scores as last year's crop of test takers."

"Continue" and "slip" - what do they MEAN?


Came in here to say this. I wonder what Lynn O'Shaughnessy,  TF author, got on her SAT.

/they're not even trying anymore
2013-09-26 12:00:43 PM  
1 votes:
ikanreed:

To be fair, imperial units suck balls.

-overheard at Yavin 4
2013-09-26 11:59:05 AM  
1 votes:

TedDalton: It's all about street smarts.....


'Street smarts' is a consolation prize.

/it's called 'common sense'
//'street smarts' is the 'swag' of thinking
2013-09-26 11:56:19 AM  
1 votes:

Pick: I asked my nephew who was 17 at the time and considered gifted by his parents, a simple mathematical question; How many gallons of water fall on an acre, if one inch of rain falls upon it? He did not know how to even start to calculate the answer.


To be fair, imperial units suck balls.
2013-09-26 11:54:14 AM  
1 votes:
Do you still get a participation ribbon fopr taking it? Because thats important for your self esteem
2013-09-26 11:47:50 AM  
1 votes:
This would be a problem, if the SAT did a good job of predicting First-Year Undergrad GPA, like it was designed to. But, you know, it doesn't, so, there you go.
 
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