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(Gizmodo)   Scientists discover a way to make real life lightsabers. No more brandishing a fluorescent tube making "swoosh" noises, people, just straight up cutting through steel and body parts   (gizmodo.com) divider line 40
    More: Cool, fluorescent tubes, scientists, PhysOrg, noises, photons, swords  
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6436 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Sep 2013 at 9:20 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-25 09:26:05 PM
I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.
 
2013-09-25 09:29:10 PM

Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.


The Star Wars movies took place entirely in a cloud of rubidium atoms.
 
2013-09-25 09:31:54 PM
An elegant weapon for a more civilized time... biatch.
 
2013-09-25 09:32:11 PM
comment FTA: "I think we all need to stop and ask how this can be applied to Rule 34"

What's their Fark handle?
 
2013-09-25 09:32:38 PM
I see your Schwartz is as big as mine.
 
2013-09-25 09:43:53 PM
I had no idea research into midichlorians had progressed so far.
 
2013-09-25 09:49:31 PM

Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.


Because they're getting light (photons) to behave in a way that's not dissimilar to solid matter. And they're geeks, so they care about stuff like lightsabers.

What I want to know, is that every technology I read about seems to get us "one step closer" to quantum computers. So how many steps away are we? The authors of these articles make it sound like we're really close, but the number of steps seems to be more like between here and Jupiter.
 
2013-09-25 09:50:54 PM
This is like someone discovering static electricity and claiming that he had invented the transistor. The gap between the two is really a chasm.
 
2013-09-25 09:58:28 PM

Macular Degenerate: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because they're getting light (photons) to behave in a way that's not dissimilar to solid matter. And they're geeks, so they care about stuff like lightsabers.

What I want to know, is that every technology I read about seems to get us "one step closer" to quantum computers. So how many steps away are we? The authors of these articles make it sound like we're really close, but the number of steps seems to be more like between here and Jupiter.


Each step gets us half of the remaining distance there, so infinite steps remain, unless space is quantized, then I believe we're some number of Heisenberg steps away.

images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-09-25 09:59:33 PM
i158.photobucket.com
oblig.
 
2013-09-25 10:00:06 PM

wax_on: I had no idea research into midichlorians had progressed so far.


Oh yeah. THAT'S why those movies were stupid. Now I remember.
 
2013-09-25 10:00:11 PM
...oops. By "Heisenberg" I should have meant "Planck"

and

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-09-25 10:05:14 PM

HighZoolander: Each step gets us half of the remaining distance there, so infinite steps remain, unless space is quantized, then I believe we're some number of Heisenberg steps away.


Man, Achilles will never pass that tortoise at that rate!

/I think this is technically the wrong paradox.
 
2013-09-25 10:09:25 PM

andrewagill: HighZoolander: Each step gets us half of the remaining distance there, so infinite steps remain, unless space is quantized, then I believe we're some number of Heisenberg steps away.

Man, Achilles will never pass that tortoise at that rate!

/I think this is technically the wrong paradox.


That's the best kind of wrong paradox.
 
2013-09-25 10:29:29 PM

zamboni: An elegant weapon for a more civilized time... biatch.


I hear Jesse, every damn time.

/"yo", too
 
2013-09-25 10:40:14 PM
So, this isn't really so much lightsabers, as it is a hard-light drive?

Rimmer will be freakin' ecstatic.
 
2013-09-25 10:56:44 PM
Don't cut your nose off to spite your face...
 
2013-09-25 11:04:46 PM

Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.


Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.
 
2013-09-25 11:07:32 PM

Mister Peejay: So, this isn't really so much lightsabers, as it is a hard-light drive?

Rimmer will be freakin' ecstatic.


It's a baby step towards Lightsabers; getting light to act similar to solid matter.

It's also a baby step towards this...

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-25 11:14:53 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.


That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.
 
2013-09-25 11:16:08 PM
Warhammer 40K spoiled me for far-out sci-fi melee weapons. Call me when they get a poweraxe working.

/Come to think about it, there hasn't been an lightaxe-wielding Jedi/Sith yet
 
2013-09-25 11:23:37 PM

doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.


What?  Ringworld was Niven's invention of a compromise between a Dyson Sphere and a planet.  Because making Ringworld already takes enough base material as it is.

You might as well snuff out a galaxy of gas giants to get a Dyson Sphere going.
 
2013-09-25 11:27:22 PM

doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.


I think you really, really REALLY need to get acquainted with reality. A Ringworld is engineering as much as a unicorn is biology.
 
2013-09-25 11:29:32 PM

blue_2501: doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.

What?  Ringworld was Niven's invention of a compromise between a Dyson Sphere and a planet.  Because making Ringworld already takes enough base material as it is.

You might as well snuff out a galaxy of gas giants to get a Dyson Sphere going.


That's the point.

A physicist like Dyson dreams up crap in a sphere because it's the most efficient mathmatically. Engineers take those lumps and shape them into things that might actually work. A Ringworld's impossibly resourse intensive already. But if you could make one, it would be infinitely cheaper and more practical than a sphere.

Actual engineers would probably get us living in a cloud of personal planetoids, like in the little prince only more practical.
 
2013-09-25 11:31:47 PM
Are they hacking the Rydberg state?

(reads article).

Yep. Called it.
 
2013-09-25 11:34:12 PM

RoyFokker'sGhost: Mister Peejay: So, this isn't really so much lightsabers, as it is a hard-light drive?

Rimmer will be freakin' ecstatic.

It's a baby step towards Lightsabers; getting light to act similar to solid matter.

It's also a baby step towards this...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x450]


I have never thought of "light sabers" to be made of just light. Hell... someone brought up in another thread that they cast shadows. They're some sort of burning blasma. Just like the blasters aren't lasers... they travel slower than light, obviously, so that's also some kind of burning matter.
 
2013-09-25 11:34:48 PM

Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.


This rule states that atoms neighboring an atom that's been excited-say, by a passing photon-cannot be excited to the same degree as the initial atom. When multiple photons pass through a cloud of atoms, this creates a push-pull force between them, which is what binds the resultant molecule.

Basically, confine a cloud of vaporized rubidium atoms, blast the hell out of it with light, the light itself binds the rubidium tighter as well as the light itself. The rubidium could be heated to insane temps, and because the infrared light (radiant heat) increases in a linear fashion the attraction and repulsion of the rubidium atoms to each other would maintain the gaseous state (however hot) without becoming a plasma or blasting through the magnetic confinement. As long as temps don't get high enough that thermal radiance MUST be done by ejecting electrons, it should maintain cohesion, and be possible to power it down and withdraw the gas from inside the confinement.
 
2013-09-25 11:42:12 PM

jonny_q: RoyFokker'sGhost: Mister Peejay: So, this isn't really so much lightsabers, as it is a hard-light drive?

Rimmer will be freakin' ecstatic.

It's a baby step towards Lightsabers; getting light to act similar to solid matter.

It's also a baby step towards this...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x450]

I have never thought of "light sabers" to be made of just light. Hell... someone brought up in another thread that they cast shadows. They're some sort of burning blasma. Just like the blasters aren't lasers... they travel slower than light, obviously, so that's also some kind of burning matter.


Well, the 'official' technobable theory on lightsabers is that they're particle fountains where the emitted particles reverse course and return to the source when they reach a certain distance. It's still getting energy to solidify and then be manipulated.
 
2013-09-25 11:54:02 PM

doglover: Actual engineers would probably get us living in a cloud of personal planetoids, like in the little prince only more practical.


You're orthogonal to reality... But you like that.
 
2013-09-26 12:39:47 AM

Mister Peejay: So, this isn't really so much lightsabers, as it is a hard-light drive?

Rimmer will be freakin' ecstatic.


Oh smeg, why couldn't have been Kristine Kochanski  instead of him
 
2013-09-26 03:54:39 AM

doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.


Are you kidding with this? The Ringworld is inherently flawed from am engineering perspective: its orbit is unstable. Any engineer that would propose something so silly clearly wasn't paying attention in his first year Physics classes when they were teaching Gauss' Law.
 
2013-09-26 04:44:06 AM

Z-clipped: doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.

Are you kidding with this? The Ringworld is inherently flawed from am engineering perspective: its orbit is unstable. Any engineer that would propose something so silly clearly wasn't paying attention in his first year Physics classes when they were teaching Gauss' Law.


Which is why an engineer would propose it and not a Physicist
 
2013-09-26 05:40:31 AM
Can I see your lazor soard?!
 
2013-09-26 07:55:07 AM

Macular Degenerate: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because they're getting light (photons) to behave in a way that's not dissimilar to solid matter. And they're geeks, so they care about stuff like lightsabers.

What I want to know, is that every technology I read about seems to get us "one step closer" to quantum computers. So how many steps away are we? The authors of these articles make it sound like we're really close, but the number of steps seems to be more like between here and Jupiter.


Nah, as difficult as it is, we can get to Jupiter. It's more like the steps between here and last Tuesday.
 
2013-09-26 09:53:31 AM

HighZoolander: Macular Degenerate: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because they're getting light (photons) to behave in a way that's not dissimilar to solid matter. And they're geeks, so they care about stuff like lightsabers.

What I want to know, is that every technology I read about seems to get us "one step closer" to quantum computers. So how many steps away are we? The authors of these articles make it sound like we're really close, but the number of steps seems to be more like between here and Jupiter.

Each step gets us half of the remaining distance there, so infinite steps remain, unless space is quantized, then I believe we're some number of Heisenberg steps away.

[images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x593]




Achilles and the tortoise.
 
2013-09-26 11:04:52 AM

HighZoolander: ...oops. By "Heisenberg" I should have meant "Planck"

and

[images4.wikia.nocookie.net image 354x479]


Are you certain?

And for the Zeno's paradox folks, luckily Leibniz & Newton came along and invented calculus so we could all move.
 
2013-09-26 12:31:27 PM

Morchella: HighZoolander: ...oops. By "Heisenberg" I should have meant "Planck"

and

[images4.wikia.nocookie.net image 354x479]

Are you certain?


Only when I'm not moving.
 
2013-09-26 01:52:07 PM

Smoking GNU: Z-clipped: doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.

Are you kidding with this? The Ringworld is inherently flawed from am engineering perspective: its orbit is unstable. Any engineer that would propose something so silly clearly wasn't paying attention in his first year Physics classes when they were teaching Gauss' Law.

Which is why an engineer would propose it and not a Physicist


So, THAT'S THE JOKE?
 
2013-09-26 02:00:58 PM
qph.is.quoracdn.net
 
2013-09-26 08:59:53 PM

doglover: Quantum Apostrophe: Erix: I read the article, and I still have no good idea why they're comparing it to a lightsaber.

Because it will let certain people believe even more that science is just about wishing what you want to happen, and sci-fi and fantasy trump reality.

That's engineering.

Physicists are boring as shiat. Just look at the Dyson Sphere. Boring idea, even if you could do it.

Now engineers? They'll make something more like the Ringworld and that's awesome.


But a ring world is inherently unstable while a sphere is not.  It would take continual attitude adjustment to make a ring world stable.  Talk about your engineering nightmare... once you manage to build the thing.
 
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