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(WLKY Louisville)   In you live in Louisville you may have noticed that the cat came back   (wlky.com) divider line 41
    More: Interesting, Louisville, cats  
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5041 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Sep 2013 at 5:01 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-25 04:15:17 PM
Here you go.
watuzee.com
 
2013-09-25 04:58:14 PM

I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]


And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.
 
2013-09-25 05:06:52 PM
Was it the very next day?
 
2013-09-25 05:06:57 PM
The Muppet Show version also epic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltlPINPn8UU
 
2013-09-25 05:12:52 PM
Meh, coyotes gotta eat too.
 
2013-09-25 05:13:54 PM
Sounds like a halfway decent idea, very badly implemented.  The concept of catching strays, neutering/spaying them and then returning them is not by itself terrible - if there is no capacity to keep the animals in a facility and they aren't a threat to the community then just doing the bare minimum of spaying/neutering is a good thing.

But this particular program was releasing the animals way too early post-surgery (in some reported cases) and also dropping off immature animals (kittens) into unfamiliar territory and in a manner that exposed them to predators (dogs, etc.) which not only is a bad idea, it gives the whole program a terrible reputation.
 
2013-09-25 05:17:31 PM
www.palzoo.net
 
2013-09-25 05:18:06 PM
FTA:  "One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

Sounds like they need to release more dogs to achieve their stated goal.
 
2013-09-25 05:18:47 PM

Tom_Slick: I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]

And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.


What's the first? I always considered that to be the best.
 
2013-09-25 05:19:36 PM
Fritz?
 
2013-09-25 05:21:49 PM

zulius: Tom_Slick: I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]

And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.

What's the first? I always considered that to be the best.


The Sweater

/It was the hideous Blue and White of the Toronto Maple Leafs.
 
2013-09-25 05:22:44 PM

zulius: Tom_Slick: I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]

And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.

What's the first? I always considered that to be the best.


The Big Snit
 
2013-09-25 05:29:24 PM

zulius: Tom_Slick: I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]

And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.

What's the first? I always considered that to be the best.


either
The Sweater
or
The Big Snit
 
2013-09-25 05:30:06 PM
weird
 
2013-09-25 05:38:37 PM
So it's more humane to let them endure weather extremes, starve, be hit by cars and attacked by other wild animals than it is to put them to sleep?

Wouldn't a more worthwhile and effective method be to offer free spay/neutering services to people who already own cats?
 
2013-09-25 05:48:21 PM

cefm: Sounds like a halfway decent idea, very badly implemented.  The concept of catching strays, neutering/spaying them and then returning them is not by itself terrible - if there is no capacity to keep the animals in a facility and they aren't a threat to the community then just doing the bare minimum of spaying/neutering is a good thing.

But this particular program was releasing the animals way too early post-surgery (in some reported cases) and also dropping off immature animals (kittens) into unfamiliar territory and in a manner that exposed them to predators (dogs, etc.) which not only is a bad idea, it gives the whole program a terrible reputation.


The article didn't make this entirely clear, but the TNR program releases them into their own neighbourhoods; whilst they ARE probably released too soon post-surgery, it is still pretty much traditional TNR as done with ferals by Alley Cat Allies affiliates; the main difference here is that the City of Louisville is actively partnering with our local Alley Cat Allies affiliate to do TNR as part of its official strategy of dealing with feral cats.  (In other words, "Community Cats" is just the branding that's done for the TNR program here.)

There's also a separate program the city does (the "Working Cats Program") that adopts out cats who do not do well in an indoor living situation as working cats--usually semi-socialised cats or cats that have behavioral issues with indoor living.

/actually local and have been working on contacting Alley Cat Advocates here along with our neighbour re our local clowder of ferals (who is even more into caring for the local ferals than us)
//the city is involved because Alley Cat Advocates is severely understaffed
 
2013-09-25 05:51:31 PM

Benjimin_Dover: FTA:  "One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

Sounds like they need to release more dogs to achieve their stated goal.


But then they will need to release more gorillas to control the dog population.
 
2013-09-25 05:54:39 PM

ReapTheChaos: So it's more humane to let them endure weather extremes, starve, be hit by cars and attacked by other wild animals than it is to put them to sleep?

Wouldn't a more worthwhile and effective method be to offer free spay/neutering services to people who already own cats?


In Louisville Metro, technically spay/neuter is already mandatory unless you have a breeding license (which anymore is only given if you have an established cattery, and license fees per cat are something like 50 dollars more than a standard cat license).  The problem is that there are still a hell of a lot of unlicensed cats and neighbours that let their cats out to breed (one of our neighbours--not the Cat Lady Neighbour who cares for the local feral clowder)--is a prime example of this, and their cat is the ancestor of fully half the cats in the local clowder) and some serious problems with cat abandonment in some apartment complexes that allow pets.

As for "why TNR"--it's been found that if feral cats are removed from an area that more ferals (that can breed) promptly move in and establish a new colony; TNR allows an established non-breeding colony to remain and protect its turf.  (It's been found in recent ethology studies that feral cat colonies act in some ways rather more like loose lion prides than the solitary lives of most small cats.)  Most places which participate in the Community Cats Program around here also usually have a "cat lady" of sorts who watches over the feral colony and provides cat boxes in winter and supplemental feeding (to get TNR around here, you have to call Alley Cat Advocates FIRST and they will give people instructions on the care of feral cat colonies).
 
2013-09-25 05:56:36 PM

ReapTheChaos: So it's more humane to let them endure weather extremes, starve, be hit by cars and attacked by other wild animals than it is to put them to sleep?

Wouldn't a more worthwhile and effective method be to offer free spay/neutering services to people who already own cats?


Also--around here, the Metro animal control department DOES offer free and reduced-cost (subsidised) spay and neuter; basically if you are below a certain income level you can get free or subsidised spay-neuter.  (Hell, they even have--not making this up--Neutermobiles coming around to neighbourhoods on occasion that act as mobile spay-neuter clinics.)
 
2013-09-25 05:58:05 PM

sno man: weird


Very.
 
2013-09-25 06:02:13 PM

Walker: Benjimin_Dover: FTA:  "One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

Sounds like they need to release more dogs to achieve their stated goal.

But then they will need to release more gorillas to control the dog population.


Winter is on the way.
 
2013-09-25 06:10:55 PM

cefm: Sounds like a halfway decent idea, very badly implemented.  The concept of catching strays, neutering/spaying them and then returning them is not by itself terrible - if there is no capacity to keep the animals in a facility and they aren't a threat to the community then just doing the bare minimum of spaying/neutering is a good thing.

But this particular program was releasing the animals way too early post-surgery (in some reported cases) and also dropping off immature animals (kittens) into unfamiliar territory and in a manner that exposed them to predators (dogs, etc.) which not only is a bad idea, it gives the whole program a terrible reputation.


Exactly. Municipalities that implement TNR successfully don't just let the cats back out there without a plan. The idea is that the spayed/neutered cats go back to their neighborhoods where a human takes on the responsibility of looking after the colony and feeding them (with the municipality subsidizing the food). They will stay as long as they get fed, and they will keep strange cats away. The idea is that being spayed/neutered, they will eventually die out without leaving multitudes of descendants, and in time, the overall feral population will decrease. That's how it works. You don't drop some newly-stitched kitties out on the street and hope for the best. <faceplant>
 
2013-09-25 06:23:03 PM

sno man: zulius: Tom_Slick: I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]

And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.

What's the first? I always considered that to be the best.

either
The Sweater
or
The Big Snit


Prefer the Big Snit.  Very quotable.

Used this one the other day in a scrabble thread:
lh4.googleusercontent.com
 
2013-09-25 06:29:48 PM
"One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

So, to this guy, the problem is that there are small animals for the killer loose dogs to eat, not that there are killer dogs running loose?
 
2013-09-25 07:50:40 PM
The 'city' I live adjacent to took a different route; all cat owners MUST register their cats (so pay a fee) and any unregistered cats found out will get dumped on the Humane Society which already lacks room for more cats. Also the city doesn't have an animal control officer or their own facility.

/the stupid, it burns
 
2013-09-25 08:26:05 PM
I thought that in catch and release is for fish.

Got a cat lady in our Radcliff neighborhood.  She keeps feeding them and now there are kittens all over the place. There are no laws for cats here, only for dogs.
 
2013-09-25 08:27:36 PM
Looks like the mouse population is taking a hit in Louisville.
 
2013-09-25 09:01:37 PM

Tom_Slick: I_Am_Weasel: Here you go.
[watuzee.com image 428x321]

And the link

/The second greatest Canadian cartoon ever made.


Thanks for that
 
2013-09-25 09:08:24 PM
Wait, this isn't a ZOOM reference?
 
2013-09-25 10:23:32 PM
Even better idea: neutered cannibal cats.
 
2013-09-25 11:37:18 PM

cefm: Sounds like a halfway decent idea, very badly implemented.  The concept of catching strays, neutering/spaying them and then returning them is not by itself terrible - if there is no capacity to keep the animals in a facility and they aren't a threat to the community then just doing the bare minimum of spaying/neutering is a good thing.

But this particular program was releasing the animals way too early post-surgery (in some reported cases) and also dropping off immature animals (kittens) into unfamiliar territory and in a manner that exposed them to predators (dogs, etc.) which not only is a bad idea, it gives the whole program a terrible reputation.


This^
 
2013-09-25 11:40:34 PM

Walker: Benjimin_Dover: FTA:  "One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

Sounds like they need to release more dogs to achieve their stated goal.

But then they will need to release more gorillas to control the dog population.


It would be total animal anarchy I tell ya!
 
2013-09-26 12:25:35 AM
including one whose stomach is still raw from being neutered.

Your doing it wrong!!!
 
2013-09-26 02:36:43 AM

poodebunker: Walker: Benjimin_Dover: FTA:  "One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

Sounds like they need to release more dogs to achieve their stated goal.

But then they will need to release more gorillas to control the dog population.

It would be total animal anarchy I tell ya!


no--doesnt anyone understand.  the dogs are part of the city's cat eradication program.
 
2013-09-26 02:52:55 AM
Lol
 
2013-09-26 03:58:27 AM
Anyone who complains about TNR can adopt those feral kittens. Problem solved.
 
2013-09-26 06:31:19 AM
Wow, I thought he was a goner.
 
2013-09-26 08:21:11 AM

Benjimin_Dover: FTA:  "One of the local dogs that was running loose grabbed one of the kittens, mauled it, and carried it down the street, shaking it," Harvey said.

Sounds like they need to release more dogs to achieve their stated goal.


This is sad, but overall many more cats survive than would if they had to be euthanized in the shelter.  I have a cat and a dog, so don't be thinking I am biased.

It's actually the fault of a-hole people who don't spay/neuter/moniter (dog) their pets.  Lesser of two evils...
 
2013-09-26 08:58:30 AM
Well, they can't be expected to do more to protect the public against the 26 or so diseases humans can pick up from cats besides vaccinate for one always fatal, rabies; after all, just for example, cats need their toxoplasmosis to sicken and mentally derange their prey for easy capture, even if it kills off some other species, like otters exposed to cat-feces contaminated water runoff.  Who needs other animals anyway, as opposed to precious feral cats? Who needs wildlife and birds? When the subsidized herd of cats finishes them off, kindly people will be supplying food for the kitties instead, so their absence will not matter, will it? Only a very few pregnant women's unborn children will be seriously affected.
 
2013-09-26 09:16:04 AM

Great Porn Dragon: cefm: Sounds like a halfway decent idea, very badly implemented.  The concept of catching strays, neutering/spaying them and then returning them is not by itself terrible - if there is no capacity to keep the animals in a facility and they aren't a threat to the community then just doing the bare minimum of spaying/neutering is a good thing.

But this particular program was releasing the animals way too early post-surgery (in some reported cases) and also dropping off immature animals (kittens) into unfamiliar territory and in a manner that exposed them to predators (dogs, etc.) which not only is a bad idea, it gives the whole program a terrible reputation.

The article didn't make this entirely clear, but the TNR program releases them into their own neighbourhoods; whilst they ARE probably released too soon post-surgery, it is still pretty much traditional TNR as done with ferals by Alley Cat Allies affiliates; the main difference here is that the City of Louisville is actively partnering with our local Alley Cat Allies affiliate to do TNR as part of its official strategy of dealing with feral cats.  (In other words, "Community Cats" is just the branding that's done for the TNR program here.)

There's also a separate program the city does (the "Working Cats Program") that adopts out cats who do not do well in an indoor living situation as working cats--usually semi-socialised cats or cats that have behavioral issues with indoor living.

/actually local and have been working on contacting Alley Cat Advocates here along with our neighbour re our local clowder of ferals (who is even more into caring for the local ferals than us)
//the city is involved because Alley Cat Advocates is severely understaffed


I'm in Louisville and I received a working cat.   She's super sweet, but she prefers beds over litter boxes apparently.   So now she occupies my garage/backyard.   I haven't seen her do an ounce of work yet, but at least she isn't dead.

/hates cats.
//this one is super needy, it overrides the usual standoffishness of cats.
 
2013-09-26 03:49:45 PM

SwiftFox: Well, they can't be expected to do more to protect the public against the 26 or so diseases humans can pick up from cats besides vaccinate for one always fatal, rabies; after all, just for example, cats need their toxoplasmosis to sicken and mentally derange their prey for easy capture, even if it kills off some other species, like otters exposed to cat-feces contaminated water runoff.  Who needs other animals anyway, as opposed to precious feral cats? Who needs wildlife and birds? When the subsidized herd of cats finishes them off, kindly people will be supplying food for the kitties instead, so their absence will not matter, will it? Only a very few pregnant women's unborn children will be seriously affected.


Cats are a favorite delicacy of coyotes which are invading urban areas themselves, so something tells me your cat-pocalypse isn't really going to be a thing. Also did you know the USDA actively works to control rabies in the wild? From the link: Since 1995, Wildlife Services (WS) has been working cooperatively with local, State, and Federal governments, universities and other partners to address this public health problem by distributing oral rabies vaccination (ORV) baits in targeted areas.   This cooperative program targets the raccoon variant, canine variant in coyotes and a unique variant of gray fox rabies
 
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