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(WTKR)   Good: Paramedics take you to the hospital after you call 911. Fark: Second paramedic crew sent to address in wrong city finally shows up while you're in the hospital, breaks down your door and won't pay for it   (wtkr.com) divider line 25
    More: Stupid, Norfolk, Carla Boykins, paramedics  
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3853 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Sep 2013 at 9:09 AM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-25 09:21:35 AM
Kind of a dick move by the city. They should have repaired her door. Four hundred bucks is not worth the negative PR, and it's a small price to pay compared with what could have happened had she been down inside.
 
2013-09-25 09:22:24 AM
Uhh...how did they do that if they were at the wrong address?

/dnrtfa
 
2013-09-25 09:24:13 AM
And this is the reason why we dont like to have the PD do forced entry.  The engine company has ways of making entry that usually do not result in damage to the door.  But the bigger question is what happend with dispatch
 
2013-09-25 09:30:20 AM

hardinparamedic: Kind of a dick move by the city. They should have repaired her door. Four hundred bucks is not worth the negative PR, and it's a small price to pay compared with what could have happened had she been down inside.


I can't imagine for a moment why they would care about negative PR.  It's not like it would impact their business, or anything else for that matter.
 
2013-09-25 09:30:48 AM
This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.
 
2013-09-25 09:32:06 AM

hardinparamedic: Kind of a dick move by the city. They should have repaired her door. Four hundred bucks is not worth the negative PR, and it's a small price to pay compared with what could have happened had she been down inside.


Yeah but that would be common sense. shiat since the PD, FD, and EMTs were all there, they could have -- not they should or would be obligated to -- passed around a collection hat and probably gotten enough. I don't know if Portsmouth or Norfolk should pay for the new door, but the woman needs a new door.
 
2013-09-25 09:41:23 AM

mod3072: This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.


How was it a cock-up on dispatch? All they could tell you was that, MAYBE, someone was transported from that address at some point earlier in the day. HIPAA prohibits sharing the name of the person with dispatch from the crew, unless the dispatchers are involved in the billing of the patient.
 
2013-09-25 09:54:48 AM

mod3072: This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.


This is far too common sense-y for Fark.
 
2013-09-25 09:56:09 AM

hardinparamedic: Kind of a dick move by the city. They should have repaired her door. Four hundred bucks is not worth the negative PR....


That's why the LAPD has a "Wrong Doors Unit".

Still doesn't help as much as not breaking down the wrong door to begin with.

Oh, and "Four Hundred bucks"?? For the LAPD's WDU, it's "a $750, city-paid-for, custom-made solid Douglas fir replacement", with "three coats of varnish... that took six days."
 
2013-09-25 09:59:53 AM
HIPAA permits disclosing a name in order to locate this patient, fyi, as this would be a "treatment and operation" disclosure, both permitted by HIPAA, and if it was overheard by scannerland it's an "incidental disclosure" also permitted under HIPAA. Also, most 911 centers (county, municipal PSAPS) are not under HIPAA, so they can let info flow freely. Only if the ambulance service was it's own dispatch service are they a covered entity, and even then both could have talked to one-another and share a name under that treat and operate clause. It's a dispatch-center-to-dispatch-center problem, two people controlling two responders from what it sounds like... someone should be paying just to make it go away.

Source: I'm our organization's HIPAA Privacy officer.
 
2013-09-25 10:09:37 AM
If only she had googled her symptoms, she could have driven herself to hospital and avoided the 911 call
 
2013-09-25 10:09:58 AM

hardinparamedic: How was it a cock-up on dispatch? All they could tell you was that, MAYBE, someone was transported from that address at some point earlier in the day. HIPAA prohibits sharing the name of the person with dispatch from the crew, unless the dispatchers are involved in the billing of the patient.


Read the article again. Smallville people call 911 and Smallville ambulance arrives at 123 Main St. and whisk her away to hospital. Meanwhile, dispatch also tells Metropolis ambulance to go to 123 Maint St. in Metropolis -- WTF??

Metropolis ambulance drivers say "Holy shiat! This is wrong. Someone still needs help! Quick, call dispatch!"

So dispatch is so farked up, they someow send a duplicate crew, in an entirely different town to respond to call, and then don't notice the duplication. "Gee, at 3am we got a call for 123 Main St. in Smallville and we sent someone. These Metropolis guys guys were trying to respond to a 3am call for 123 Main St. in Smallville . . . What a coincidence! Two different people called from the same place at the same time. Neat-o!"
 
2013-09-25 10:16:14 AM
If only there were some way to convey that the patient was already transported to hospital...
 
2013-09-25 10:19:29 AM

mod3072: This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.


Agreed.  The paramedics did the right thing in the situation, dispatched farked up.  The bill should go to dispatch.

hardinparamedic: How was it a cock-up on dispatch? All they could tell you was that, MAYBE, someone was transported from that address at some point earlier in the day. HIPAA prohibits sharing the name of the person with dispatch from the crew, unless the dispatchers are involved in the billing of the patient.


Dispatch allocated two crews to the call.
 
2013-09-25 10:30:03 AM
Interesting how there's no name mentioned or picture of the complaintant, yet the quotes in the article clearly indicate to me that the person involved is black. It's as if those people are trying to use a different language.
 
2013-09-25 10:35:27 AM
Five months later, her door is still damaged and the city of Norfolk told NewsChannel 3 they are not paying to get it fixed.

Wait... what?  Seriously?  Can the internet just buy this woman a new door already?  Christ.
 
2013-09-25 11:25:15 AM

hardinparamedic: Kind of a dick move by the city. They should have repaired her door. Four hundred bucks is not worth the negative PR, and it's a small price to pay compared with what could have happened had she been down inside.


Why the fark would the city care about negative PR?
 
2013-09-25 12:09:38 PM

hardinparamedic: mod3072: This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.

How was it a cock-up on dispatch? All they could tell you was that, MAYBE, someone was transported from that address at some point earlier in the day. HIPAA prohibits sharing the name of the person with dispatch from the crew, unless the dispatchers are involved in the billing of the patient.


1.) They dispatched a crew to the wrong damn town.
2.) They then dispatched a second crew to the correct address without informing the first crew that a second team was en-route.
3.) When the first crew showed up on scene, they failed to notify them that the situation had been handled.

Dispatch should have been aware of all of this. We notify dispatch when we leave the station, when we arrive on scene, when we depart the scene, when we arrive at the hospital, when we leave the hospital, and when we arrive back in service. Crew #2 should have reported to dispatch that they were transporting a patient from 123 1st. St, Anywhere USA. When crew #1 arrived at 123 1st. St., Anywhere USA, dispatch should have known that the patient was already transported and should have called off crew #1. In fact, crew #1 should have been 10-22'd the second that crew #2 was dispatched and should have never gotten to the scene in the first place. Failure all-around.

Oh, and they shouldn't need the name of the patient to know it's the same person. If crew #1 shows up at a residential address to transport a 57 year-old male with chest pain, and crew #2 had already picked up a 57 year-old male with chest pain from the same address minutes earlier, it's a safe bet that we're talking about the same person.
 
2013-09-25 12:21:18 PM

China White Tea: Five months later, her door is still damaged and the city of Norfolk told NewsChannel 3 they are not paying to get it fixed.

Wait... what?  Seriously?  Can the internet just buy this woman a new door already?  Christ.


As long as half the money goes to making sure (through legal means) that the current mayor never holds elected office again, sure.
 
2013-09-25 12:41:11 PM

mod3072: hardinparamedic: mod3072: This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.

How was it a cock-up on dispatch? All they could tell you was that, MAYBE, someone was transported from that address at some point earlier in the day. HIPAA prohibits sharing the name of the person with dispatch from the crew, unless the dispatchers are involved in the billing of the patient.

1.) They dispatched a crew to the wrong damn town.
2.) They then dispatched a second crew to the correct address without informing the first crew that a second team was en-route.
3.) When the first crew showed up on scene, they failed to notify them that the situation had been handled.

Dispatch should have been aware of all of this. We notify dispatch when we leave the station, when we arrive on scene, when we depart the scene, when we arrive at the hospital, when we leave the hospital, and when we arrive back in service. Crew #2 should have reported to dispatch that they were transporting a patient from 123 1st. St, Anywhere USA. When crew #1 arrived at 123 1st. St., Anywhere USA, dispatch should have known that the patient was already transported and should have called off crew #1. In fact, crew #1 should have been 10-22'd the second that crew #2 was dispatched and should have never gotten to the scene in the first place. Failure all-around.

Oh, and they shouldn't need the name of the patient to know it's the same person. If crew #1 shows up at a residential address to transport a 57 year-old male with chest pain, and crew #2 had already picked up a 57 year-old male with chest pain from the same address minutes earlier, it's a safe bet that we're talking ...



Oh no, a voice of reason and experience! You're breaking my mind by making sense.

/someone get this door fixed, stat!
 
2013-09-25 01:19:33 PM

mod3072: hardinparamedic: mod3072: This was a cock up at the dispatch level, and the agency that screwed up should pay for the door. I don't think the ambulance service should be responsible for fixing your door if they legitimately have to do forced entry to help you, but this was a mistake, plain and simple. Pay the bill, figure out what went wrong with your dispatch system, slap someone on the wrist if you need to, and move on.

How was it a cock-up on dispatch? All they could tell you was that, MAYBE, someone was transported from that address at some point earlier in the day. HIPAA prohibits sharing the name of the person with dispatch from the crew, unless the dispatchers are involved in the billing of the patient.

1.) They dispatched a crew to the wrong damn town.
2.) They then dispatched a second crew to the correct address without informing the first crew that a second team was en-route.
3.) When the first crew showed up on scene, they failed to notify them that the situation had been handled.

Dispatch should have been aware of all of this. We notify dispatch when we leave the station, when we arrive on scene, when we depart the scene, when we arrive at the hospital, when we leave the hospital, and when we arrive back in service. Crew #2 should have reported to dispatch that they were transporting a patient from 123 1st. St, Anywhere USA. When crew #1 arrived at 123 1st. St., Anywhere USA, dispatch should have known that the patient was already transported and should have called off crew #1. In fact, crew #1 should have been 10-22'd the second that crew #2 was dispatched and should have never gotten to the scene in the first place. Failure all-around.

Oh, and they shouldn't need the name of the patient to know it's the same person. If crew #1 shows up at a residential address to transport a 57 year-old male with chest pain, and crew #2 had already picked up a 57 year-old male with chest pain from the same address minutes earlier, it's a safe bet that we're talking ...


Whelp. I'll admit when I'm wrong. Bravo, Sir. ^_^
 
2013-09-25 01:36:20 PM

StrangeQ: Why the fark would the city care about negative PR?


I'm pretty sure they actually prefer it.

Helps to keep the sheep in their place.
 
2013-09-25 01:38:43 PM

fredklein: Oh, and "Four Hundred bucks"?? For the LAPD's WDU, it's "a $750, city-paid-for, custom-made solid Douglas fir replacement", with "three coats of varnish... that took six days."


And, I'm guessing, special break-away hinges to make it easier to enter next time?

Or do they just keep a copy of the new key?
 
2013-09-25 02:15:14 PM
Good luck with that defense.
 
2013-09-25 02:38:11 PM
Still at issue is how Portsmouth received a call for service for a Norfolk problem, and why it took them dispatching a crew to the wrong address to figure it out.

I'm sure the initial call was made from a cell phone.

In my area 911 calls from a cell phone go through dispatch 40 miles away. The first thing you need to tell the operator is what city you're calling from so they can route your call to the local emergency services.
 
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