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(Orlando Sentinel)   Your state's students are failing a state-mandated test. You are the Governor. Do you C) back out of a new program that would ensure students are properly educated in core concepts like math, English, and science?   (orlandosentinel.com) divider line 94
    More: Florida, Common Core, FCAT, governors, language arts, academic standards, Florida Legislature, exams, Rick Scott  
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4198 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2013 at 1:32 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-24 12:23:07 AM  
This should not be a surprise to anyone.
 
2013-09-24 12:39:25 AM  
How about D), stop using standardized tests as they've been shown over and over to be completely useless outside of producing little memorizing robots instead of thinking humans.
 
2013-09-24 12:45:12 AM  
This thread will be filled with anger, undue hatred, misjudgments, misperceptions, and down-right lies. He is a Republican which means certain people hate him just for opening a door. The would be reversed if he was a Democrat

Pretty much this is what every Fark thread is concerning politics

No one really gives a shiat about doing the right thing. All people care about is beating their enemy.
 
2013-09-24 12:46:03 AM  

cman: This thread will be filled with anger, undue hatred, misjudgments, misperceptions, and down-right lies. He is a Republican which means certain people hate him just for opening a door. Those roles would be reversed if he was a Democrat

Pretty much this is what every Fark thread is concerning politics

No one really gives a shiat about doing the right thing. All people care about is beating their enemy.


Whoops. Rewrote a sentence and forgot to change a few things around. Fixt
 
2013-09-24 12:56:51 AM  

CPT Ethanolic: How about D), stop using standardized tests as they've been shown over and over to be completely useless outside of producing little memorizing robots instead of thinking humans.


Common Core isn't primarily about standardized tests, it's about a nationally standardized curriculum to make sure that students across the nation receive the same high quality education and cover the same topics.  It makes a lot of sense to adopt national standards, as long as they're developed by actual educators, which these were.  Plus, they're not ironclad sets of rules and pre-written lesson plans.  It's basically just a collection of milestones students should reach and topics students should cover by each grade, it still allows a lot of flexibility for teachers to teach the way that is most effective for them and their students.

NCLB requires some form of standardized tests, so FL has to do something.  The new test they were going to adopt was based on the Common Core standards, and is also planned for implementation in other states, which would allow for easier comparison between states to judge the quality of education the students are receiving.

There's very little reason to oppose this, and Scott isn't going right out and opposing it, but he isn't really standing behind it either.  He's trying to appease the teabaggers, likely in anticipation of his re-election campaign next year, which, if there is any justice in this world, will end with him being tossed out on his ass.
 
2013-09-24 01:36:51 AM  
SKELETOR BOWS TO NO ONE
 
2013-09-24 01:44:04 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Common Core isn't primarily about standardized tests, it's about a nationally standardized curriculum to make sure that students across the nation receive the same high quality education and cover the same topics.  It makes a lot of sense to adopt national standards, as long as they're developed by actual educators, which these were.  Plus, they're not ironclad sets of rules and pre-written lesson plans.  It's basically just a collection of milestones students should reach and topics students should cover by each grade, it still allows a lot of flexibility for teachers to teach the way that is most effective for them and their students.

NCLB requires some form of standardized tests, so FL has to do something.  The new test they were going to adopt was based on the Common Core standards, and is also planned for implementation in other states, which would allow for easier comparison between states to judge the quality of education the students are receiving.

There's very little reason to oppose this, and Scott isn't going right out and opposing it, but he isn't really standing behind it either.  He's trying to appease the teabaggers, likely in anticipation of his re-election campaign next year, which, if there is any justice in this world, will end with him being tossed out on his ass.


This is the pure, unvarnished truth. There are only a couple more things to say...

1) The Republicans and Teatards and Koch-suckers absolutely farking LOVED Federally-mandated, standardized high-stakes tests when it was NCLB. It was all about "accountability" and destroying public education so taxpayer money could be shoveled into private hands.

2) When the tests start to actually be used to improve education they stamp their feet and say that it's not fair that the tests should actually measure how students think and reason.

3) The States that are bawling the loudest are the ones with piss-poor performance - Florida, Georgia, Arkansas. They don't want to be shown up for the know-nothing ignorant cocksockets they really are.

4) The bit about "Federal overreach" and "Federal intrusion" is an absolute bald-faced motherfarking lie. The Federal government didn't have jack-shiat to do with Common Core. It was hammered out by the States. Every State had input and signed off on it. But if there's one thing Conservatives are good at doing it's lying when the truth doesn't flatter them enough.
 
2013-09-24 01:48:12 AM  
fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."
 
2013-09-24 01:51:59 AM  
D: 'In today's computer class, we will teach you how to improve your state-mandated grades'.

www.themarysue.com
 
2013-09-24 01:52:30 AM  

Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."


No, there is just a small list of info that all kids should learn. That you consider what is covered in highschool a "big list of info" speaks volumes.
 
2013-09-24 01:54:21 AM  

GungFu: D: 'In today's computer class, we will teach you how to improve your state-mandated * grades'.

[www.themarysue.com image 560x331]


*test

/failed inglish
 
2013-09-24 01:58:47 AM  

Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."


As someone using American curriculum to teach Chinese high school students things like creative writing and literary comprehension, I love Common Core because it gives me signposts for developing lessons. The standards are relatively flexible across different disciplines.

This idea that there isn't a basic skillset each student should at least be proficient in is idiotic. Some kids are going to be more advanced than others in different disciplines but there absolutely needs to be basic competency.
 
2013-09-24 01:59:53 AM  

Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."


Common Core isn't a big list of facts to memorize, it's a collection of skills that any student should be comfortable with to be able to handle college, trade school, or today's job market.  It's also not all-inclusive, mainly focusing on math and reading/writing, with literacy milestones so that students can effectively process the data in social studies, science, and technology classes as well.  Even in the subjects that it covers, it's only a starting point.  Teachers would be free to expand on the points covered in Common Core for the more advanced students that can handle it.

It will take time, but if it's adopted nearly universally, it will be great for students who have to switch schools, as they'll be able to pick up practically from where they left off.
 
2013-09-24 02:01:50 AM  
I like how the video went straight from something something raising educational standards to some guy named Trout catching a ball.
 
2013-09-24 02:03:11 AM  

Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."


You're right, BUT Common core is not a big list. It's completely reasonable for kids to learn this stuff before they graduate form HS.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-09-24 02:03:28 AM  
FTFA:

"I don't believe that there's any backing up from the idea that we have to have a strong curriculum

And that curriculum needs to be make sense so that our students can compete across the United States for college entrance. I don't think we've backed up from that at all.

What I understand the governor to be saying is 'we have a system here that hasn't been fully invented or vetted yet and we're being asked to comply with. That doesn't seem to make sense, particularly in Florida where we've been a leader in developing standards."

-Florida State Senate President Don Gaetz

I don't know about that last part, but Senator Gaetz seems to answer the complaints about the move very well here.  The Tea Party's participation here seems to be ignorant, annoying, and purposefully meddling to serve their own interests.  It's an instance where I think it's OK to say, "Please, won't somebody think of the children?"

Reviewing a new curriculum is always a contentious issue.  Testing based on that curriculum is equally so.
I would prefer that the people in charge here carry on, and placate the whiners.

But I don't live in Florida.  I don't care.  I do hope that they can teach their students to succeed.
 
2013-09-24 02:04:47 AM  

powhound: I like how the video went straight from something something raising educational standards to some guy named Trout catching a ball.


Sports is something Americans can understand, not that mathin' stuff.
 
2013-09-24 02:06:17 AM  
Fire Marshall Bill Governor Scott strikes again.
 
2013-09-24 02:19:37 AM  
Problem solved

awesomelyluvvie.com
 
2013-09-24 02:26:07 AM  

CPT Ethanolic: How about D), stop using standardized tests as they've been shown over and over to be completely useless outside of producing little memorizing robots instead of thinking humans.


Anything to back up that claim?  What about a standardized test in math is "memorizing robots" when they are no longer required to memorize formulas, but are required to solve problems by identifying which formula they should be using, then using it properly.
 
2013-09-24 02:34:09 AM  
The tag tells it all.
 
2013-09-24 02:37:25 AM  

UsikFark: Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."

You're right, BUT Common core is not a big list. It's completely reasonable for kids to learn this stuff before they graduate form HS.


/just sayin' :)
 
2013-09-24 02:37:41 AM  

GungFu: [www.themarysue.com image 560x331]


They made such a cute couple!
 
2013-09-24 02:44:54 AM  

Abacus9: UsikFark: Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."

You're right, BUT Common core is not a big list. It's completely reasonable for kids to learn this stuff before they graduate form HS.

/just sayin' :)


It's a typo, and a distinctive one of mine. I usually catch it.
 
2013-09-24 02:54:46 AM  

UsikFark: Abacus9: UsikFark: Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."

You're right, BUT Common core is not a big list. It's completely reasonable for kids to learn this stuff before they graduate form HS.

/just sayin' :)

It's a typo, and a distinctive one of mine. I usually catch it.


You'll have to fill out a from.
 
2013-09-24 02:55:31 AM  

UsikFark: Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."

You're right, BUT Common core is not a big list. It's completely reasonable for kids to learn this stuff before they graduate form HS.


TuteTibiImperes: Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."

Common Core isn't a big list of facts to memorize, it's a collection of skills that any student should be comfortable with to be able to handle college, trade school, or today's job market.  It's also not all-inclusive, mainly focusing on math and reading/writing, with literacy milestones so that students can effectively process the data in social studies, science, and technology classes as well.  Even in the subjects that it covers, it's only a starting point.  Teachers would be free to expand on the points covered in Common Core for the more advanced students that can handle it.

It will take time, but if it's adopted nearly universally, it will be great for students who have to switch schools, as they'll be able to pick up practically from where they left off.


howdoibegin: Blue_Blazer: fark Common Core Curriculum.  There is no "one great big list of info that all kids should learn."

No, there is just a small list of info that all kids should learn. That you consider what is covered in highschool a "big list of info" speaks volumes.


Alright then folks, since you're all so certain:  Here is the complete list of High School Common Core Standards for Math.
http://www.corestandards.org/Math

Explain how the definition of the meaning of rational exponents follows from extending the properties of integer exponents to those values, allowing for a notation for radicals in terms of rational exponents.
Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents.
Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational.
Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.
Define appropriate quantities for the purpose of descriptive modeling.
Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.
Know there is a complex number i such that i2 = -1, and every complex number has the form a + bi with a and b real.
Use the relation i2 = -1 and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties to add, subtract, and multiply complex numbers.
Find the conjugate of a complex number; use conjugates to find moduli and quotients of complex numbers.
Represent complex numbers on the complex plane in rectangular and polar form (including real and imaginary numbers), and explain why the rectangular and polar forms of a given complex number represent the same number.
Represent addition, subtraction, multiplication, and conjugation of complex numbers geometrically on the complex plane; use properties of this representation for computation. For example, (-1 + √3 i)3 = 8 because (-1 + √3 i) has modulus 2 and argument 120°.
Calculate the distance between numbers in the complex plane as the modulus of the difference, and the midpoint of a segment as the average of the numbers at its endpoints
Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions.
Extend polynomial identities to the complex numbers. For example, rewrite x2 + 4 as (x + 2i)(x - 2i).
Know the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra; show that it is true for quadratic polynomials.
Recognize vector quantities as having both magnitude and direction. Represent vector quantities by directed line segments, and use appropriate symbols for vectors and their magnitudes (e.g., v, |v|, ||v||, v).
Find the components of a vector by subtracting the coordinates of an initial point from the coordinates of a terminal point.
Solve problems involving velocity and other quantities that can be represented by vectors.
Add and subtract vectors.
Multiply a vector by a scalar.
Use matrices to represent and manipulate data, e.g., to represent payoffs or incidence relationships in a network.
Multiply matrices by scalars to produce new matrices, e.g., as when all of the payoffs in a game are doubled.
Add, subtract, and multiply matrices of appropriate dimensions.
Understand that, unlike multiplication of numbers, matrix multiplication for square matrices is not a commutative operation, but still satisfies the associative and distributive properties.
Understand that the zero and identity matrices play a role in matrix addition and multiplication similar to the role of 0 and 1 in the real numbers. The determinant of a square matrix is nonzero if and only if the matrix has a multiplicative inverse.
Multiply a vector (regarded as a matrix with one column) by a matrix of suitable dimensions to produce another vector. Work with matrices as transformations of vectors.
Work with 2 × 2 matrices as a transformations of the plane, and interpret the absolute value of the determinant in terms of area.
Interpret expressions that represent a quantity in terms of its context.
Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. For example, see x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2)
Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression
Derive the formula for the sum of a finite geometric series (when the common ratio is not 1), and use the formula to solve problems. For example, calculate mortgage payments.
Understand that polynomials form a system analogous to the integers, namely, they are closed under the operations of addition, subtraction, and multiplication; add, subtract, and multiply polynomials.
Know and apply the Remainder Theorem: For a polynomial p(x) and a number a, the remainder on division by x - a is p(a), so p(a) = 0 if and only if (x - a) is a factor of p(x).
Identify zeros of polynomials when suitable factorizations are available, and use the zeros to construct a rough graph of the function defined by the polynomial.
Prove polynomial identities and use them to describe numerical relationships. For example, the polynomial identity (x2 + y2)2 = (x2 - y2)2 + (2xy)2 can be used to generate Pythagorean triples
Know and apply the Binomial Theorem for the expansion of (x + y)n in powers of x and y for a positive integer n, where x and y are any numbers, with coefficients determined for example by Pascal's Triangle
Rewrite simple rational expressions in different forms; write a(x)/b(x) in the form q(x) + r(x)/b(x), where a(x), b(x), q(x), and r(x) are polynomials with the degree of r(x) less than the degree of b(x), using inspection, long division, or, for the more complicated examples, a computer algebra system.
Understand that rational expressions form a system analogous to the rational numbers, closed under addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division by a nonzero rational expression; add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions.
Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.
Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.
Represent constraints by equations or inequalities, and by systems of equations and/or inequalities, and interpret solutions as viable or nonviable options in a modeling context
Rearrange formulas to highlight a quantity of interest, using the same reasoning as in solving equations.
Explain each step in solving a simple equation as following from the equality of numbers asserted at the previous step, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Construct a viable argument to justify a solution method.
Solve simple rational and radical equations in one variable, and give examples showing how extraneous solutions may arise.
Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters
Solve quadratic equations in one variable.
Prove that, given a system of two equations in two variables, replacing one equation by the sum of that equation and a multiple of the other produces a system with the same solutions.
Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.
Solve a simple system consisting of a linear equation and a quadratic equation in two variables algebraically and graphically
Represent a system of linear equations as a single matrix equation in a vector variable
Find the inverse of a matrix if it exists and use it to solve systems of linear equations (using technology for matrices of dimension 3 × 3 or greater).
Understand that the graph of an equation in two variables is the set of all its solutions plotted in the coordinate plane, often forming a curve (which could be a line).
Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
Graph the solutions to a linear inequality in two variables as a half-plane (excluding the boundary in the case of a strict inequality), and graph the solution set to a system of linear inequalities in two variables as the intersection of the corresponding half-planes.
Understand that a function from one set (called the domain) to another set (called the range) assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range. If f is a function and x is an element of its domain, then f(x) denotes the output of f corresponding to the input x. The graph of f is the graph of the equation y = f(x).
Use function notation, evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context.
Recognize that sequences are functions, sometimes defined recursively, whose domain is a subset of the integers. For example, the Fibonacci sequence is defined recursively by f(0) = f(1) = 1, f(n+1) = f(n) + f(n-1) for n ≥ 1.
For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal description of the relationship. Key features include: intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; end behavior; and periodicity
Relate the domain of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes. For example, if the function h(n) gives the number of person-hours it takes to assemble n engines in a factory, then the positive integers would be an appropriate domain for the function.
Calculate and interpret the average rate of change of a function (presented symbolically or as a table) over a specified interval. Estimate the rate of change from a graph.
Graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases
Write a function defined by an expression in different but equivalent forms to reveal and explain different properties of the function.
Compare properties of two functions each represented in a different way (algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions).
Write a function that describes a relationship between two quantities.
Write arithmetic and geometric sequences both recursively and with an explicit formula, use them to model situations, and translate between the two forms.
Identify the effect on the graph of replacing f(x) by f(x) + k, k f(x), f(kx), and f(x + k) for specific values of k (both positive and negative); find the value of k given the graphs. Experiment with cases and illustrate an explanation of the effects on the graph using technology. Include recognizing even and odd functions from their graphs and algebraic expressions for them.
Find inverse functions.
Understand the inverse relationship between exponents and logarithms and use this relationship to solve problems involving logarithms and exponents.
Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and with exponential functions.
Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table).
Observe using graphs and tables that a quantity increasing exponentially eventually exceeds a quantity increasing linearly, quadratically, or (more generally) as a polynomial function.
For exponential models, express as a logarithm the solution to abct = d where a, c, and d are numbers and the base b is 2, 10, or e; evaluate the logarithm using technology.
Interpret the parameters in a linear or exponential function in terms of a context.
Understand radian measure of an angle as the length of the arc on the unit circle subtended by the angle.
Explain how the unit circle in the coordinate plane enables the extension of trigonometric functions to all real numbers, interpreted as radian measures of angles traversed counterclockwise around the unit circle.
Use special triangles to determine geometrically the values of sine, cosine, tangent for π/3, π/4 and π/6, and use the unit circle to express the values of sine, cosine, and tangent for x, π + x, and 2π - x in terms of their values for x, where x is any real number.
Use the unit circle to explain symmetry (odd and even) and periodicity of trigonometric functions.
Choose trigonometric functions to model periodic phenomena with specified amplitude, frequency, and midline.
Understand that restricting a trigonometric function to a domain on which it is always increasing or always decreasing allows its inverse to be constructed.
Use inverse functions to solve trigonometric equations that arise in modeling contexts; evaluate the solutions using technology, and interpret them in terms of the context
Prove the Pythagorean identity sin2(θ) + cos2(θ) = 1 and use it to find sin(θ), cos(θ), or tan(θ) given sin(θ), cos(θ), or tan(θ) and the quadrant of the angle.
Prove the addition and subtraction formulas for sine, cosine, and tangent and use them to solve problems.
Know precise definitions of angle, circle, perpendicular line, parallel line, and line segment, based on the undefined notions of point, line, distance along a line, and distance around a circular arc.
Represent transformations in the plane using, e.g., transparencies and geometry software; describe transformations as functions that take points in the plane as inputs and give other points as outputs. Compare transformations that preserve distance and angle to those that do not (e.g., translation versus horizontal stretch).
Given a rectangle, parallelogram, trapezoid, or regular polygon, describe the rotations and reflections that carry it onto itself.
Develop definitions of rotations, reflections, and translations in terms of angles, circles, perpendicular lines, parallel lines, and line segments.
Given a geometric figure and a rotation, reflection, or translation, draw the transformed figure using, e.g., graph paper, tracing paper, or geometry software. Specify a sequence of transformations that will carry a given figure onto another.
Use geometric descriptions of rigid motions to transform figures and to predict the effect of a given rigid motion on a given figure; given two figures, use the definition of congruence in terms of rigid motions to decide if they are congruent.
Use the definition of congruence in terms of rigid motions to show that two triangles are congruent if and only if corresponding pairs of sides and corresponding pairs of angles are congruent.
Explain how the criteria for triangle congruence (ASA, SAS, and SSS) follow from the definition of congruence in terms of rigid motions.
Prove theorems about lines and angles. Theorems include: vertical angles are congruent; when a transversal crosses parallel lines, alternate interior angles are congruent and corresponding angles are congruent; points on a perpendicular bisector of a line segment are exactly those equidistant from the segment's endpoints.
Prove theorems about triangles. Theorems include: measures of interior angles of a triangle sum to 180°; base angles of isosceles triangles are congruent; the segment joining midpoints of two sides of a triangle is parallel to the third side and half the length; the medians of a triangle meet at a point.
Prove theorems about parallelograms. Theorems include: opposite sides are congruent, opposite angles are congruent, the diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other, and conversely, rectangles are parallelograms with congruent diagonals.
Make formal geometric constructions with a variety of tools and methods (compass and straightedge, string, reflective devices, paper folding, dynamic geometric software, etc.). Copying a segment; copying an angle; bisecting a segment; bisecting an angle; constructing perpendicular lines, including the perpendicular bisector of a line segment; and constructing a line parallel to a given line through a point not on the line.
Construct an equilateral triangle, a square, and a regular hexagon inscribed in a circle.
Verify experimentally the properties of dilations given by a center and a scale factor:
Given two figures, use the definition of similarity in terms of similarity transformations to decide if they are similar; explain using similarity transformations the meaning of similarity for triangles as the equality of all corresponding pairs of angles and the proportionality of all corresponding pairs of sides.
Use the properties of similarity transformations to establish the AA criterion for two triangles to be similar.
Use congruence and similarity criteria for triangles to solve problems and to prove relationships in geometric figures.
Understand that by similarity, side ratios in right triangles are properties of the angles in the triangle, leading to definitions of trigonometric ratios for acute angles.
Explain and use the relationship between the sine and cosine of complementary angles.
Use trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles in applied problems.
Derive the formula A = 1/2 ab sin(C) for the area of a triangle by drawing an auxiliary line from a vertex perpendicular to the opposite side.
Prove the Laws of Sines and Cosines and use them to solve problems
Understand and apply the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines to find unknown measurements in right and non-right triangles (e.g., surveying problems, resultant forces).
Prove that all circles are similar.
Identify and describe relationships among inscribed angles, radii, and chords. Include the relationship between central, inscribed, and circumscribed angles; inscribed angles on a diameter are right angles; the radius of a circle is perpendicular to the tangent where the radius intersects the circle.
Construct the inscribed and circumscribed circles of a triangle, and prove properties of angles for a quadrilateral inscribed in a circle.
Construct a tangent line from a point outside a given circle to the circle.
Derive using similarity the fact that the length of the arc intercepted by an angle is proportional to the radius, and define the radian measure of the angle as the constant of proportionality; derive the formula for the area of a sector.
Derive the equation of a circle of given center and radius using the Pythagorean Theorem; complete the square to find the center and radius of a circle given by an equation.
Derive the equation of a parabola given a focus and directrix.
Derive the equations of ellipses and hyperbolas given the foci, using the fact that the sum or difference of distances from the foci is constant.
Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically. For example, prove or disprove that a figure defined by four given points in the coordinate plane is a rectangle; prove or disprove that the point (1, √3) lies on the circle centered at the origin and containing the point (0, 2).
Prove the slope criteria for parallel and perpendicular lines and use them to solve geometric problems (e.g., find the equation of a line parallel or perpendicular to a given line that passes through a given point).
Find the point on a directed line segment between two given points that partitions the segment in a given ratio.
Use coordinates to compute perimeters of polygons and areas of triangles and rectangles, e.g., using the distance formula.
Give an informal argument for the formulas for the circumference of a circle, area of a circle, volume of a cylinder, pyramid, and cone. Use dissection arguments, Cavalieri's principle, and informal limit arguments.
Give an informal argument using Cavalieri's principle for the formulas for the volume of a sphere and other solid figures.
Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems.
Identify the shapes of two-dimensional cross-sections of three-dimensional objects, and identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional objects.
Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder).
Apply concepts of density based on area and volume in modeling situations (e.g., persons per square mile, BTUs per cubic foot).
Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).
Represent data with plots on the real number line (dot plots, histograms, and box plots).
Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center (median, mean) and spread (interquartile range, standard deviation) of two or more different data sets.
Interpret differences in shape, center, and spread in the context of the data sets, accounting for possible effects of extreme data points (outliers).
Use the mean and standard deviation of a data set to fit it to a normal distribution and to estimate population percentages. Recognize that there are data sets for which such a procedure is not appropriate. Use calculators, spreadsheets, and tables to estimate areas under the normal curve.
Summarize categorical data for two categories in two-way frequency tables. Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data (including joint, marginal, and conditional relative frequencies). Recognize possible associations and trends in the data.
Represent data on two quantitative variables on a scatter plot, and describe how the variables are related.
Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.
Compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient of a linear fit.
Distinguish between correlation and causation.
Understand statistics as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population.
Decide if a specified model is consistent with results from a given data-generating process, e.g., using simulation. For example, a model says a spinning coin falls heads up with probability 0.5. Would a result of 5 tails in a row cause you to question the model?
Recognize the purposes of and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies; explain how randomization relates to each.
Use data from a sample survey to estimate a population mean or proportion; develop a margin of error through the use of simulation models for random sampling.
Use data from a randomized experiment to compare two treatments; use simulations to decide if differences between parameters are significant.
Evaluate reports based on data.
Describe events as subsets of a sample space (the set of outcomes) using characteristics (or categories) of the outcomes, or as unions, intersections, or complements of other events ("or," "and," "not").
Understand that two events A and B are independent if the probability of A and B occurring together is the product of their probabilities, and use this characterization to determine if they are independent.
Understand the conditional probability of A given B as P(A and B)/P(B), and interpret independence of A and B as saying that the conditional probability of A given B is the same as the probability of A, and the conditional probability of B given A is the same as the probability of B.
Construct and interpret two-way frequency tables of data when two categories are associated with each object being classified. Use the two-way table as a sample space to decide if events are independent and to approximate conditional probabilities.
Recognize and explain the concepts of conditional probability and independence in everyday language and everyday situations. For example, compare the chance of having lung cancer if you are a smoker with the chance of being a smoker if you have lung cancer.
Find the conditional probability of A given B as the fraction of B's outcomes that also belong to A, and interpret the answer in terms of the model.
Apply the Addition Rule, P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B) - P(A and B), and interpret the answer in terms of the model.
Apply the general Multiplication Rule in a uniform probability model, P(A and B) = P(A)P(B|A) = P(B)P(A|B), and interpret the answer in terms of the model.
Use permutations and combinations to compute probabilities of compound events and solve problems.
Define a random variable for a quantity of interest by assigning a numerical value to each event in a sample space; graph the corresponding probability distribution using the same graphical displays as for data distributions.
Calculate the expected value of a random variable; interpret it as the mean of the probability distribution.
Develop a probability distribution for a random variable defined for a sample space in which theoretical probabilities can be calculated; find the expected value. For example, find the theoretical probability distribution for the number of correct answers obtained by guessing on all five questions of a multiple-choice test where each question has four choices, and find the expected grade under various grading schemes.
Develop a probability distribution for a random variable defined for a sample space in which probabilities are assigned empirically; find the expected value. For example, find a current data distribution on the number of TV sets per household in the United States, and calculate the expected number of sets per household. How many TV sets would you expect to find in 100 randomly selected households?
Weigh the possible outcomes of a decision by assigning probabilities to payoff values and finding expected values.
Use probabilities to make fair decisions (e.g., drawing by lots, using a random number generator).
Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).
 
2013-09-24 02:57:51 AM  
Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-09-24 03:00:53 AM  

Blue_Blazer: It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.


The fundamentalists would seem to have a good grip on the fundamentals, but alas.
 
2013-09-24 03:02:55 AM  

433: Blue_Blazer: It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.

The fundamentalists would seem to have a good grip on the fundamentals, but alas.


One would think, but when it comes to Science and Social Studies, turns out they are both subjective infiltrated by the debbil.
 
2013-09-24 03:04:56 AM  
I like stupid, poorly educated Americans. It means more of us get the really good, well paid jobs that require educated people.
Keep being dumbasses please - more jobs for the rest of us.
 
2013-09-24 03:08:59 AM  
Florida will manage the impossible and make all the kids below average.
 
2013-09-24 03:10:19 AM  

Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.


And what's the problem with that?  It's a list of skills and concepts that any high school graduate should know.  That doesn't all have to be taught in the same class in the same year, and many of those concepts will build on concepts they've learned in math class before high school.

One of the ideas behind Common Core is that the concepts taught follow a logical progression - that students are given the tools and understanding to be able to comprehend more complex concepts before they run into them.
 
2013-09-24 03:18:02 AM  

Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.


It is a small list, considering they have FOUR FREAKING YEARS to learn it. And what's this about Science and Social Studies? What school did YOU go to?
 
2013-09-24 03:19:27 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.

And what's the problem with that?  It's a list of skills and concepts that any high school graduate should know.  That doesn't all have to be taught in the same class in the same year, and many of those concepts will build on concepts they've learned in math class before high school.

One of the ideas behind Common Core is that the concepts taught follow a logical progression - that students are given the tools and understanding to be able to comprehend more complex concepts before they run into them.


Well, one of the problems is that the students who failed to learn part of the logical progression will fall behind, and the teacher can give that student all the individual attention and scaffolded instruction s/he has time for, but the likelihood of that student catching up and pulling even with the rest of the classroom is very low.  Children will and do get "left behind," in a high-stakes testing classroom.

Another problem is your suggestion of teachers teaching beyond the Core is laughable at best.  Teachers already have far too little time in the classroom as it is, and they must cover all the content that is mapped out for their class, leaving very little enrichment time for the teacher to use.  Most "extra" time that a teacher has is eaten up reteaching your slower learners, not teaching above and beyond for the advanced students, unless they happen to be in an Honor's or AP class (offer void where these classes have been axed by budget cuts or lack of interest).
 
2013-09-24 03:21:05 AM  

Abacus9: Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.

It is a small list, considering they have FOUR FREAKING YEARS to learn it. And what's this about Science and Social Studies? What school did YOU go to?


Your statement is ambiguous, and perhaps mine was too, so to be clear:  Yes there are state standards for Social Studies and Science, but there are not (yet) any Common Core Standards, which are meant to be nationwide.
 
2013-09-24 03:24:48 AM  
i.qkme.me
 
2013-09-24 03:29:05 AM  

Blue_Blazer: TuteTibiImperes: Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.

And what's the problem with that?  It's a list of skills and concepts that any high school graduate should know.  That doesn't all have to be taught in the same class in the same year, and many of those concepts will build on concepts they've learned in math class before high school.

One of the ideas behind Common Core is that the concepts taught follow a logical progression - that students are given the tools and understanding to be able to comprehend more complex concepts before they run into them.

Well, one of the problems is that the students who failed to learn part of the logical progression will fall behind, and the teacher can give that student all the individual attention and scaffolded instruction s/he has time for, but the likelihood of that student catching up and pulling even with the rest of the classroom is very low.  Children will and do get "left behind," in a high-stakes testing classroom.

Another problem is your suggestion of teachers teaching beyond the Core is laughable at best.  Teachers already have far too little time in the classroom as it is, and they must cover all the content that is mapped out for their class, leaving very little enrichment time for the teacher to use.  Most "extra" time that a teacher has is eaten up reteaching your slower learners, not teaching above and beyond for the advanced students, unless they happen to be in an Honor's or AP class (offer void where these classes have been axed by budget cuts or lack of interest).


One of the big reasons to push for universal of common core is so that students don't miss out on part of the progression.  It shouldn't matter if they start school in MA, stop off in MS, and finish in MT, as long as all of those schools are using common core the student will be on pace with the other kids.

And yes, students fall behind sometimes, but that happens with other curricula as well.  Because one student has fallen behind doesn't mean that the rest of the students should be prevented from moving forward.

I am a big proponent of tracking at the high school level.  There's no reason that honors and AP classes couldn't go well beyond the CC concepts.  Mainstream classes could focus on making sure everyone at least got them, and remedial classes could focus on getting as much of the basic concepts as they could.

Students will fall behind no matter what.  Tests or no tests, CC or not, there will be some kids that for various reasons aren't going to be willing or able to grasp all of the material.  That isn't a reason not to try to standardize the curriculum or push for a set of skills that will prepare the students who can handle it for the modern world.
 
2013-09-24 03:30:08 AM  
Common Core sucks.  It has actually LOWERED the standards at my children's school.
LOWERED.  And we live in Mississippi!
 
2013-09-24 03:32:48 AM  

cman: This thread will be filled with anger, undue hatred, misjudgments, misperceptions, and down-right lies. He is a Republican which means certain people hate him just for opening a door. The would be reversed if he was a Democrat

Pretty much this is what every Fark thread is concerning politics

No one really gives a shiat about doing the right thing. All people care about is beating their enemy.


trust me, cman, if you knew this guy, you'd hate him too.

This is one of those guys who make even Generic Republicans look bad.

The guy passed a law required drug testing of all food assistance recipients....AND HIS WIFE OWNS THE COMPANY THAT ADMINISTERS THE TEST.
 
2013-09-24 03:41:02 AM  

cman: This thread will be filled with anger, undue hatred, misjudgments, misperceptions, and down-right lies. He is a Republican which means certain people hate him just for opening a door. The would be reversed if he was a Democrat

Pretty much this is what every Fark thread is concerning politics

No one really gives a shiat about doing the right thing. All people care about is beating their enemy.


You sound like a butthurt conservative who can't stand the thought that someone, somewhere, might both politically oppose you and have a decent idea as to how something important might be improved.
 
2013-09-24 03:43:40 AM  

cman: This thread will be filled with anger, undue hatred, misjudgments, misperceptions, and down-right lies. He is a Republican which means certain people hate him just for opening a door. The would be reversed if he was a Democrat

Pretty much this is what every Fark thread is concerning politics

No one really gives a shiat about doing the right thing. All people care about is beating their enemy.


Go home, cman, you're drunk.
 
2013-09-24 03:49:22 AM  

Blue_Blazer: pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).


Why'd you have to put the only one I could understand at the very end of the list, huh? You tryin' to make me feel stoopid or somethin'?
 
2013-09-24 04:06:11 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: Blue_Blazer: pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).

Why'd you have to put the only one I could understand at the very end of the list, huh? You tryin' to make me feel stoopid or somethin'?


LOL that's funny, eh?
 
2013-09-24 04:16:11 AM  
Governor Scott is doing this because he knows that the Common Core testing will expose the state's education system for what it is: A sham. Under FCAT, Florida can set its own standards and only has to measure up to itself. A school rating of "A+" under the Florida system only carries significance in Florida. Many years ago, my daughter attended an A+ rated high school in Seminole County, Florida after having attended schools in Fairfax County, Virginia. The difference between the school systems was like night and day. The curriculum was weaker and the standards were weaker. She aced all her classes. After that one school year, we moved back to Virginia and she had to take some additional courses over the summer to bring herself back in line with where she needed to be academically to resume her schooling there. When we were living in Florida, it seemed as though the schools were something that the state's politicians really didn't want to fund. There was a real sense that the folks in Tallahassee thought the whole concept of public education was a costly, burdensome concession they were making in order to attract more families to the state. The voters mandated class size restrictions back in 2002 and the state legislators almost blew a fuse. The reduction program has been drawn out as long as possible over the years since then.

As a parent who has lived in Florida multiple times, I would advise parents considering a move to Florida to look into private schools if you want your kids to be academically challenged and able to compete on a national scale. The public school systems down there are underfunded and hobbled as much as possible by legislators who don't like spending tax money for education. They want families to move to Florida, buy houses, and spend money, but they don't want to have to fund the education system required to teach the kids in those families.
 
2013-09-24 04:24:44 AM  
these headlines that miss out a) and b) don't work

do I have to do everything!?
 
2013-09-24 04:28:24 AM  
State mandated tests typically guarantee that the students will learn nothing useful.  Only how to pass that test.  Shiat canning those tests would be a step forward in education, though I doubt that was the reason for pulling out of the program since politicians are involved.
 
2013-09-24 04:35:28 AM  

Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.


It's education, not childcare. You really think that list is overkill as a result of 12 years of education?
 
2013-09-24 04:40:44 AM  

Abacus9: Blue_Blazer: Some small list.  Keep in mind that is just for High School Math.  English has a 'big list' as well.  Science and Social Studies do not, yet, but they are in the works.  It's a bit harder to get those approved by the fundies.

It is a small list, considering they have FOUR FREAKING YEARS to learn it. And what's this about Science and Social Studies? What school did YOU go to?


Social Studies is suppose to be working towards the English writing goals.  Students write about History topics.
 
2013-09-24 04:41:42 AM  

Lady J: these headlines that miss out a) and b) don't work


Just like in all standardized tests, here at Fark the answer is always c).
 
2013-09-24 04:42:35 AM  

Fark Me To Tears: As a parent who has lived in Florida multiple times, I would advise parents considering a move to Florida to look into private schools if you want your kids to be academically challenged and able to compete on a national scale. The public school systems down there are underfunded and hobbled as much as possible by legislators who don't like spending tax money for education. They want families to move to Florida, buy houses, and spend money, but they don't want to have to fund the education system required to teach the kids in those families.


Scary, as those from Florida will often talk about how Florida has higher standards then Arizona.
 
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