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(The Atlantic Cities)   French farming village in flight path of Paris' Charles de Gaulle airport surrenders, becomes virtual ghost town. With before and after pic eeriness   (theatlanticcities.com) divider line 35
    More: Strange, Charles de Gaulle, Goussainville-Vieux Pays, Paris Air Show, Grade II, postcards, Concorde, scenic routes, airports  
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13222 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Sep 2013 at 4:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-24 12:37:37 AM  
Is this Detroit's sister city?
 
2013-09-24 03:33:44 AM  
Done in one.
 
2013-09-24 04:25:42 AM  

Yes this is dog: Done in one.


Good. I think I read this on Fark about a month ago.
 
2013-09-24 04:31:02 AM  
Actually, Detroit's sister city is Toyota, Japan, which is very fitting.

/only Hiroshima would be more so
 
2013-09-24 05:11:27 AM  
subtle xenophobia from subby there, or am I just being ultra sensitive
 
2013-09-24 05:24:30 AM  
What a completely useless, bullshiat story. How about giving us some population numbers, both pre- and post-"exodus"? Was the population increasing/declining/holding steady before the airport was built, and how much and how soon did it decline after CDG began operating? This "journalist" needs to go back to J1.

Interesting photos, but they don't really tell us all that much.
 
2013-09-24 05:41:25 AM  

August11: Yes this is dog: Done in one.

Good. I think I read this on Fark about a month ago.


More like last week. This about 10-20that minutes from where I live. Luckily we are not in the normal flight paths.
 
2013-09-24 05:46:26 AM  
I thought the sign on the door said "Chien Merchant"

That would be unusual, even for France
 
2013-09-24 05:50:31 AM  

Cormee: I thought the sign on the door said "Chien Merchant"

That would be unusual, even for France


France doesn't have any Korea Towns?
 
2013-09-24 05:57:10 AM  
 
2013-09-24 06:01:27 AM  
That was like a Daily Fail article.
 
2013-09-24 06:10:26 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: France doesn't have any Korea Towns?


Forget Korea, the French are more than capable of eating non-standard food items. I was in a shop in a small village in the Alsace region and saw jars of 'Rodent Pate' on a shelf, with a small badly-drawn picture of a rat/rodent, happily scampering across a meadow.

So yeh, maybe it wouldn't be unusual for France, as I first suggested.
 
2013-09-24 06:19:05 AM  

Cormee: Danger Avoid Death: France doesn't have any Korea Towns?

Forget Korea, the French are more than capable of eating non-standard food items. I was in a shop in a small village in the Alsace region and saw jars of 'Rodent Pate' on a shelf, with a small badly-drawn picture of a rat/rodent, happily scampering across a meadow.

So yeh, maybe it wouldn't be unusual for France, as I first suggested.


more likely to be coypu, which is a pest out there, or something, than actual pied piper rat.

they call it ragondin. terrine de ragondin sounds all right

and only in America would some of the fast food you eat not be described as non standard (be described as standard).

i dont know why im geting defensive on behalf of our friends across the channel, perhaps it's a distance thing. championing by Lady J is inversely related to crow flight distance from London. suck it norway
 
2013-09-24 06:21:53 AM  

Cormee: I thought the sign on the door said "Chien Merchant"

That would be unusual, even for France


i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-24 06:42:44 AM  
Dude, there was like two before and after pics.
Pitiful.
 
2013-09-24 06:49:11 AM  

Lady J: Cormee: Danger Avoid Death: France doesn't have any Korea Towns?

Forget Korea, the French are more than capable of eating non-standard food items. I was in a shop in a small village in the Alsace region and saw jars of 'Rodent Pate' on a shelf, with a small badly-drawn picture of a rat/rodent, happily scampering across a meadow.

So yeh, maybe it wouldn't be unusual for France, as I first suggested.

more likely to be coypu, which is a pest out there, or something, than actual pied piper rat.

they call it ragondin. terrine de ragondin sounds all right

and only in America would some of the fast food you eat not be described as non standard (be described as standard).

i dont know why im geting defensive on behalf of our friends across the channel, perhaps it's a distance thing. championing by Lady J is inversely related to crow flight distance from London. suck it norway


Aww, now lighten up Lady J, I said 'unusual,' there's nothing derogatory about that. And regardless of its name, it is a rodent, so those along with horses and snails would be considered an unusual foodstuffs by those not used to eating them.

Also, I'm not in America, I'm in Ireland, so they're close neighbours of mine as well, and I enjoy France, and the company of the French, very much during the two or three trips I take there a year.
 
2013-09-24 06:53:12 AM  
Cormee:
Aww, now lighten up Lady J, I said 'unusual,' there's nothing derogatory about that. And regardless of its name, it is a rodent, so those along with horses and snails would be considered an unusual foodstuffs by those not used to eating them.

Also, I'm not in America, I'm in Ireland, so they're close neighbours of mine as well, and I enjoy France, and the company of the French, very much during the two or three trips I take there a year.


il let you off then, THIS ONE TIME

/Hi I'm Lady J and I'm overly sensitive to anti European sentiment.... oh it feels good to say! [sob] you're all so kind! [sob, sob] etc
 
2013-09-24 07:10:48 AM  

Lady J: Cormee:
Aww, now lighten up Lady J, I said 'unusual,' there's nothing derogatory about that. And regardless of its name, it is a rodent, so those along with horses and snails would be considered an unusual foodstuffs by those not used to eating them.

Also, I'm not in America, I'm in Ireland, so they're close neighbours of mine as well, and I enjoy France, and the company of the French, very much during the two or three trips I take there a year.

il let you off then, THIS ONE TIME

/Hi I'm Lady J and I'm overly sensitive to anti European sentiment.... oh it feels good to say! [sob] you're all so kind! [sob, sob] etc


As far as the food is concerned I don't have think it is anti-European. It's mostly people just getting their food out of a package. But it probably was pate de ragondin, which is generally referred to as nutria in Louisiana and Mississippi, where it is also eaten.
/I've met gar more anti-European attitudes from the UK than I ever have from the states
//the anti-French stuff is different we inherited that from jolly old England
 
2013-09-24 07:20:59 AM  

new_york_monty: Is this Detroit's sister city?


Yes.  Exactly.
 
2013-09-24 07:35:39 AM  
I remember that mansion from Uncharted 3.
 
2013-09-24 07:38:22 AM  
Cool photos, but yeah, subby hyped it a little too much. We visited Paris a few years ago, and I'd love to live there.

/can pull off the French well enough people think she's Belgian. That'll work!
 
2013-09-24 08:12:13 AM  

Danger Avoid Death: What a completely useless, bullshiat story. How about giving us some population numbers, both pre- and post-"exodus"? Was the population increasing/declining/holding steady before the airport was built, and how much and how soon did it decline after CDG began operating? This "journalist" needs to go back to J1.

Interesting photos, but they don't really tell us all that much.


TFA probably written by photographer, then translated to English by way of Turkish, by people not native to any of the three tongues.
 
2013-09-24 08:26:53 AM  
Stupid subby.  The move of the town has less to do with the airport, and more with the build-up and shift of the town over thhe 1920's to 1950's period.  The town center was moved in the 1950's, well before the airport was built.
 
2013-09-24 08:29:39 AM  
Rotting homes and abandoned churches: Eerie French ghost town Goussainville-Vieux Pays remains in ruins 40 years after tragedy struck

But less than a year before the airport was finished, tragedy hit Goussainville-Vieux Pays when, during the Paris Air Show of 1973, a prototype of a Soviet supersonic aircraft named Tupolev TU-144 crashed in the village.

The plane, which is rumoured to have been built using stolen Concorde plans and eventually led to accusations of corporate espionage, smashed into a row of 15 houses and a school, causing the deaths of six crew and a further eight people on the ground.
 
2013-09-24 08:35:02 AM  

Lady J: subtle xenophobia from subby there, or am I just being ultra sensitive


Any time France is mentioned around here, the concept of surrender must be included in the headline or the article won't be greenlit.

/I tihnk it's because the sites run by 12 year olds from middle America.
 
2013-09-24 08:36:47 AM  
Meanwhile...

China's Ghost Cities... Are Multiplying

www.zerohedge.com

That's Paris, obviously. There's the Eiffel Tower, and there are some of those quaint Parisian fountains and buildings. Yeah?

Nope. In fact, that shot was taken nearly 6,000 miles from the City of Lights. So... what's the deal?

That's actually Tianducheng, a luxury real estate development and Paris look-alike that's located in Hangzhou, China.

Tianducheng lacks much of what Paris has to offer though -- including people. The development is now more or less abandoned, giving it an even eerier, ghost-town feel.

According to the Atlantic Cities, Tianducheng has been in the works since 2007. The area, however, hasn't seen much success yet. While the development could accommodate 10,000 residents, it is largely uninhabited.

The lack of people is mostly attributed to its odd location. Tianducheng is surrounded mostly by farmland and odd dead-end roads that snake throughout the countryside.

The Paris copycat is actually a pretty impressive clone of the real thing. The 300-foot Eiffel Tower replica looks pretty realistic, though it's only about a third of the size of its French counterpart. By comparison, the Las Vegas replica at the Paris Las Vegas is half-scale and clocks in at 541 feet
 
2013-09-24 08:44:06 AM  

jmr61: Dude, there was like two before and after pics.
Pitiful.


And nothing particularly eerie about any of them.
 
2013-09-24 08:49:58 AM  

StrangeQ: jmr61: Dude, there was like two before and after pics.
Pitiful.

And nothing particularly eerie about any of them.


cdn.theatlanticcities.com

ee·rie

1. unnerving: unnerving or unusual in a way that suggests a connection with the supernatural


But yeah it's nowhere near the lake.

/in a mood
 
2013-09-24 09:24:57 AM  

Lady J: subtle xenophobia from subby there, or am I just being ultra sensitive


For all the anti-American sentiment out there I don't think people should feel bad.

//Or anti-southern, anti-NY, anti-Boston, anti-flyover, etc.
 
2013-09-24 11:26:31 AM  
nycaviation.com
 
2013-09-24 09:47:40 PM  
Well, I for one would take advantage of that now cheap property and thusly could get a really nice house. I would still add some sound proofing but I don't really mind the airplane noise..

/As long as I have my hearing system turned off, I doubt I would even notice that I was at the end of a runway.
 
2013-09-25 01:59:58 AM  

dionysusaur: Danger Avoid Death: What a completely useless, bullshiat story. How about giving us some population numbers, both pre- and post-"exodus"? Was the population increasing/declining/holding steady before the airport was built, and how much and how soon did it decline after CDG began operating? This "journalist" needs to go back to J1.

Interesting photos, but they don't really tell us all that much.

TFA probably written by photographer, then translated to English by way of Turkish, by people not native to any of the three tongues.


Or Google Translate. For some often funny results translate some English into another language in Google and then back to English.
 
2013-09-25 02:01:43 AM  

TenJed_77: Lady J: Cormee:
Aww, now lighten up Lady J, I said 'unusual,' there's nothing derogatory about that. And regardless of its name, it is a rodent, so those along with horses and snails would be considered an unusual foodstuffs by those not used to eating them.

Also, I'm not in America, I'm in Ireland, so they're close neighbours of mine as well, and I enjoy France, and the company of the French, very much during the two or three trips I take there a year.

il let you off then, THIS ONE TIME

/Hi I'm Lady J and I'm overly sensitive to anti European sentiment.... oh it feels good to say! [sob] you're all so kind! [sob, sob] etc

As far as the food is concerned I don't have think it is anti-European. It's mostly people just getting their food out of a package. But it probably was pate de ragondin, which is generally referred to as nutria in Louisiana and Mississippi, where it is also eaten.
/I've met gar more anti-European attitudes from the UK than I ever have from the states
//the anti-French stuff is different we inherited that from jolly old England


Yes. There are plenty of English who despise the French for some reason. My dad is one of them as is my boss.
 
2013-09-25 02:07:06 AM  

mjbok: Lady J: subtle xenophobia from subby there, or am I just being ultra sensitive

For all the anti-American sentiment out there I don't think people should feel bad.

//Or anti-southern, anti-NY, anti-Boston, anti-flyover, etc.


There's plenty of that in both England and Australia as well. Mostly because people only notice the loud, obnoxious type of American and assume that all Americans are like that. It's especially bizarre in the case of Australians though, because there are plenty of loud, obnoxious Australians as well.
 
2013-09-25 02:15:23 AM  
 
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