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(PBS)   Listen, and understand. That bomb disposal robot is out there. It can't be bargained with. It can't be reasoned with. It doesn't feel pity, or remorse, or fear   (pbs.org) divider line 31
    More: Weird, military robots, Miles O'Brien, bomb disposal, gun salute, robots  
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1632 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Sep 2013 at 3:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-22 11:28:52 AM  
It'll be back.
 
2013-09-22 01:34:39 PM  
This is psychologically fascinating. It also shows that something doesn't have to be human, or even look human, for people to attempt to relate to it.
 
2013-09-22 02:36:17 PM  
This is a surprise? Look at the love that vehicles get. Tanks, planes, and let's face it, soldiers even become attached to their weapons. They're tools, but when you are invested in that tool, to keep you alive, you put care into its maintenance, you put care into its continued operation, and as social apes, we tend to then invest some emotion into that. Planes have long been the focus for pilots and crews--the same with boats and ships. Anyone who has a car that they've dumped a ton of money into, there is an attachment to that vehicle, or a love/hate sort of relationship if the dang thing KEEPS breaking down despite all your care.

Robots in the field, they are tools and some of them KEEP their people alive by being stand ins, but that "risk" that the 'bot is taking, with the telepresence to operate, means that the operator uses that tool in a way that puts him in its place.

"You don't want someone to hesitate using one of these robots if they have feelings toward the robot that goes beyond a tool," she said. "If you feel emotionally attached to something, it will affect your decision-making."

This is a statement from someone who isn't a soldier, and is far from the field, and doesn't understand really the folks that she's doing a study of. People have great affection for the tools of their trade. Be that a favorite knife for a chef--or a cranky old oven for that matter--to a truck for construction workers, to even a pallet jack for folks who work in warehouses. We imbue objects with "magic" all the time. Be that our "lucky" hammer, a favorite pen, or a weapon that spits leaden death and has never failed to cycle properly when things get hairy on the field. This isn't surprising in the least. We are social apes, and this is part of our make up.
 
2013-09-22 03:06:03 PM  
Is there some point at which it will stop?
 
2013-09-22 03:52:06 PM  
Has anyone seen Sara Conner?
 
2013-09-22 04:09:04 PM  
Unavailable for comment.
 
2013-09-22 04:11:24 PM  
HighOnCraic:


media.avclub.com

Unavailable for comment.
 
2013-09-22 04:11:33 PM  

Sid_6.7: This is psychologically fascinating. It also shows that something doesn't have to be human, or even look human, for people to attempt to relate to it.


images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-09-22 04:13:29 PM  
> LOOK
"Looks dangerous out there," says Floyd. "I don't think you should go there." He peers in again. "We'll need that phone trigger to disarm IED. Hmmm... I know! Floyd will get phone. Robots are tough. Nothing can hurt robots. You open the door, then Floyd will rush out. Then you close door. When Floyd knocks, open door again. Okay? Go!" Floyd's voice trembles slightly as he waits for you to open the door.

> SAVE
"Oh boy! Are we gonna try something dangerous now?"

> OPEN DOOR
The HumVee's door opens and Floyd, pausing only for the briefest moment, plunges into the desert sand. Immediately, he is set upon by machine gun fire! The fire is getting closer to the open door! Floyd shrieks and yells to you to close the door.

> CLOSE DOOR
From within the HumVee you hear the plinking of bullets, the sounds of a skirmish, and then a high-pitched metallic scream!

> WAIT
You hear, slightly muffled by the door, an explosion, followed by the distinctive sound of tearing metal, and three fast knocks.

> OPEN DOOR
The door opens.
Floyd stumbles into the HumVee, clutching a few pieces of what was once an IED trigger. The dust clods kicked up by the gunfire are getting close to the open doorway!

> CLOSE DOOR
The door closes.
And not a moment too soon! You hear gunfire plinking off the door as the enemy troops vent their frustration at losing their prey.

Floyd staggers to the seat, dropping the trigger. He is badly torn apart, with loose wires and broken circuits everywhere. Oil flows from his lubrication system. He obviously has only moments to live.

You drop to your knees and cradle Floyd's head in your lap. Floyd looks up at his friend with half-open eyes. "Floyd did it ... disarmed IED. Floyd a good friend, huh?" Quietly, you sing Floyd's favorite song, the Ballad of the Starcrossed Implementor...
 
2013-09-22 04:15:44 PM  

Cagey B: Is there some point at which it will stop?


perhaps while someone is still alive?
 
2013-09-22 04:37:25 PM  
when you're stuck on a hot, dirty, dusty, loud, lethal battlefield fighting to protect rich folk's property/system, its hard not to get lonely and get attached to a robot.

because the robot is more human than the Turds running the war, making the money off war (Congressional military industrial complex) and having their kids at University farking their brains out (or drugged up) while the middle/working/poor kids die for "freedom".


ain't Freedom great!
 
2013-09-22 04:41:15 PM  

Cagey B: Is there some point at which it will stop?



not as long as their are enough people/businesess making money off war and have the dollars to buy Legislators to keep wars going.

when war is no longer profitable, then war will end.  or when the kids of those who start wars go on to the battlefield.  which ever comes first.
 
2013-09-22 04:57:23 PM  
"The wars of the future will not be fought on the battlefield or at sea. They will be fought in space, or possibly on top of a very tall mountain. In either case, most of the actual fighting will be done by small robots. And as you go forth today remember always your duty is clear: To build and maintain those robots."
 
2013-09-22 05:01:53 PM  
But you aren't helping it. Why aren't you helping the tortoise?
 
2013-09-22 05:09:23 PM  
gifmesmile.com
 
2013-09-22 07:17:11 PM  
www.blastr.com
You're totally getting fragged for that, captain.
 
2013-09-22 07:21:47 PM  
www.fimfiction-static.net
 
2013-09-22 08:18:32 PM  
Hmm. Interesting. I'm working on a sci-fi story about the psychological aspects of being a combat drone operator. This is an angle I should have been considering, not just seeing the robot as an extension of the operator but anthropomorphizing it into a "person" or at least something like a pet.
 
2013-09-22 08:33:44 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Hmm. Interesting. I'm working on a sci-fi story about the psychological aspects of being a combat drone operator. This is an angle I should have been considering, not just seeing the robot as an extension of the operator but anthropomorphizing it into a "person" or at least something like a pet.


I think that BioWare may have beaten you to it...

fc01.deviantart.net
 
2013-09-22 08:44:38 PM  

hubiestubert: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Hmm. Interesting. I'm working on a sci-fi story about the psychological aspects of being a combat drone operator. This is an angle I should have been considering, not just seeing the robot as an extension of the operator but anthropomorphizing it into a "person" or at least something like a pet.

I think that BioWare may have beaten you to it...

[fc01.deviantart.net image 527x717]


Did you say something? All I heard was "dat ass"
 
2013-09-22 08:57:33 PM  

hubiestubert: [...]

"You don't want someone to hesitate using one of these robots if they have feelings toward the robot that goes beyond a tool," she said. "If you feel emotionally attached to something, it will affect your decision-making."

This is a statement from someone who isn't a soldier, and is far from the field, and doesn't understand really the folks that she's doing a study of. People have great affection for the tools of their trade. Be that a favorite knife for a chef--or a cranky old oven for that matter--to a truck for construction workers, to even a pallet jack for folks who work in warehouses. We imbue objects with "magic" all the time. Be that our "lucky" hammer, a favorite pen, or a weapon that spits leaden death and has never failed to cycle properly when things get hairy on the field. This isn't surprising in the least. We are social apes, and this is part of our make up.


It sounded like you were building up nicely to make a point and then the oven timer went off, or something.

As you described, most people develop some attachment to their finer tools, even if "finer" just means the machine that has enough hoss to brute force the job done.  The attachment grows both from an appreciation for the capabilities of the machine and simply being goddamn around it all the time.

You, hubie, might be imagined to have a favorite knife that you call "Mr. Slicey" for its hard steel and ever-sharp edge that can effortlessly shave carrots into curls thinner than a c*nt hair.  Would you hesitate to stab it into or throw it at an armed and threatening intruder to your domain?  Your call - might seriously ding the edge of an expensive blade.

People are funny with their attachments and our ability to be rational about it varies by the person and the level of attachment.   I've got an old pickup truck that I love.  It bears the scars of 20 years of love and abuse.  The more dents the thing got, the more I loved it because every bit of damage was from me and it, doing work (OK, just doing stuff, sometimes).  Never gave it a name, unless "the truck" is a name.  I'd sacrifice that thing in an instant to save a human life.

Wait.  Did I make any point in there?

Shiat.
 
2013-09-22 09:17:20 PM  

SansNeural: t sounded like you were building up nicely to make a point and then the oven timer went off, or something.

As you described, most people develop some attachment to their finer tools, even if "finer" just means the machine that has enough hoss to brute force the job done.  The attachment grows both from an appreciation for the capabilities of the machine and simply being goddamn around it all the time.

You, hubie, might be imagined to have a favorite knife that you call "Mr. Slicey" for its hard steel and ever-sharp edge that can effortlessly shave carrots into curls thinner than a c*nt hair.  Would you hesitate to stab it into or throw it at an armed and threatening intruder to your domain?  Your call - might seriously ding the edge of an expensive blade.

People are funny with their attachments and our ability to be rational about it varies by the person and the level of attachment.   I've got an old pickup truck that I love.  It bears the scars of 20 years of love and abuse.  The more dents the thing got, the more I loved it because every bit of damage was from me and

it, doing work (OK, just doing stuff, sometimes).  Never gave it a name, unless "the truck" is a name.  I'd sacrifice that thing in an instant to save a human life.

Wait.  Did I make any point in there?
Shiat.


I will have you know, that all my knives are perfectly sweet gals, who have the uncanny ability to find the soft bits between bone and tissue, and if I have one of my girls in my hand when an intruder comes knocking, she WILL slide ever so effortlessly between ribs and perforate diaphram, weezend or lay a trachea open to the air to make a curious whistling sound. And she'll do it with class and style, because she's a lady. And a lady will certainly help a gentleman dispose of any evidence, which the cranky old furnace may balk at the larger bits, but I'm sure that we can come to an understanding to get his help in the long run...

Coming at a chef in his own kitchen you'd best bring a shotgun and hope to Gods that I haven't got cast iron or a blade in my hands when you do. You propriate to the Kitchen Gods and give the kami who inhabit all things the respect that they deserve, or they WILL turn upon you.
 
2013-09-22 09:20:01 PM  

Twilight Farkle: > LOOK
"Looks dangerous out there," says Floyd. "I don't think you should go there." He peers in again. "We'll need that phone trigger to disarm IED. Hmmm... I know! Floyd will get phone. Robots are tough. Nothing can hurt robots. You open the door, then Floyd will rush out. Then you close door. When Floyd knocks, open door again. Okay? Go!" Floyd's voice trembles slightly as he waits for you to open the door.

> SAVE
"Oh boy! Are we gonna try something dangerous now?"

> OPEN DOOR
The HumVee's door opens and Floyd, pausing only for the briefest moment, plunges into the desert sand. Immediately, he is set upon by machine gun fire! The fire is getting closer to the open door! Floyd shrieks and yells to you to close the door.

> CLOSE DOOR
From within the HumVee you hear the plinking of bullets, the sounds of a skirmish, and then a high-pitched metallic scream!

> WAIT
You hear, slightly muffled by the door, an explosion, followed by the distinctive sound of tearing metal, and three fast knocks.

> OPEN DOOR
The door opens.
Floyd stumbles into the HumVee, clutching a few pieces of what was once an IED trigger. The dust clods kicked up by the gunfire are getting close to the open doorway!

> CLOSE DOOR
The door closes.
And not a moment too soon! You hear gunfire plinking off the door as the enemy troops vent their frustration at losing their prey.

Floyd staggers to the seat, dropping the trigger. He is badly torn apart, with loose wires and broken circuits everywhere. Oil flows from his lubrication system. He obviously has only moments to live.

You drop to your knees and cradle Floyd's head in your lap. Floyd looks up at his friend with half-open eyes. "Floyd did it ... disarmed IED. Floyd a good friend, huh?" Quietly, you sing Floyd's favorite song, the Ballad of the Starcrossed Implementor...


Iris sees what you did there.

also, you're my latest hero.

60 moves later, a reactor exploded and millions died.
 
2013-09-22 09:47:21 PM  

hubiestubert: This is a surprise? Look at the love that vehicles get. Tanks, planes, and let's face it, soldiers even become attached to their weapons. They're tools, but when you are invested in that tool, to keep you alive, you put care into its maintenance, you put care into its continued operation, and as social apes, we tend to then invest some emotion into that. Planes have long been the focus for pilots and crews--the same with boats and ships. Anyone who has a car that they've dumped a ton of money into, there is an attachment to that vehicle, or a love/hate sort of relationship if the dang thing KEEPS breaking down despite all your care.

Robots in the field, they are tools and some of them KEEP their people alive by being stand ins, but that "risk" that the 'bot is taking, with the telepresence to operate, means that the operator uses that tool in a way that puts him in its place.

"You don't want someone to hesitate using one of these robots if they have feelings toward the robot that goes beyond a tool," she said. "If you feel emotionally attached to something, it will affect your decision-making."

This is a statement from someone who isn't a soldier, and is far from the field, and doesn't understand really the folks that she's doing a study of. People have great affection for the tools of their trade. Be that a favorite knife for a chef--or a cranky old oven for that matter--to a truck for construction workers, to even a pallet jack for folks who work in warehouses. We imbue objects with "magic" all the time. Be that our "lucky" hammer, a favorite pen, or a weapon that spits leaden death and has never failed to cycle properly when things get hairy on the field. This isn't surprising in the least. We are social apes, and this is part of our make up.


blogs.knoxnews.com
site.rockbottomgolf.com
 
2013-09-22 09:52:59 PM  
No disassemble!
 
2013-09-22 10:09:39 PM  

SansNeural: People are funny with their attachments and our ability to be rational about it varies by the person and the level of attachment.   I've got an old pickup truck that I love.  It bears the scars of 20 years of love and abuse.  The more dents the thing got, the more I loved it because every bit of damage was from me and it, doing work (OK, just doing stuff, sometimes).  Never gave it a name, unless "the truck" is a name.  I'd sacrifice that thing in an instant to save a human life


No, you wouldn't. You still own the truck, you have not sold it to buy food or medicine for other humans in need. I'm not being critical of you, I own things for work and pleasure I've not sold either. Our empathy has limits, because it has to in order for us to function. I've no doubt that if I was in immediate danger and the truck was...you'd chose to save me. Or any other person on FARK...well most of 'em. ;) Or a dog. Who wouldn't save a dog over a truck? (A monster, that's who!). But if we pull back, eventually we'd reach a point where it's not worth it. Would you sell it to help a friend who needed food or medicine? I bet you would. Or give it to a friend or loved one who really needed it for work or transport? Sure. Neighbor down the block? Maybe. Kid you don't know in town? Maaaybe. Further away you get, the less empathy you have and the less important/pressing it seems to us personally to intervene.

This is also a problem in size/scale. We can give generously when it's 1 person, or a couple. When it's a disaster big in scope, we downgrade our charity because it seems like we just really can't help. Doesn't mean people don't give, they do. But it's why Haiti might not generate as much charity as a local family displaced by fire.

Our attachment to things can also lessen that empathy for others. And when we attach that empathy to things that do not have agency, we risk harming those who DO have agency, and that is a really terrible cognitive 'bug' that we have to be aware of and counter when we can.
 
2013-09-23 03:03:01 AM  
hubiestubert:

"You don't want someone to hesitate using one of these robots if they have feelings toward the robot that goes beyond a tool," she said. "If you feel emotionally attached to something, it will affect your decision-making."

This is a statement from someone who isn't a soldier, and is far from the field, and doesn't understand really the folks that she's doing a study of.


Yes, and it's insulting.
 
2013-09-23 11:54:04 AM  

Cagey B: Is there some point at which it will stop?


25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-09-23 11:56:18 AM  

Cagey B: Is there some point at which it will stop?


Actually, I take that back, this is the one with the lyrics:
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-09-23 04:44:54 PM  
hubiestubert:
I will have you know, that all my knives are perfectly sweet gals, who have the uncanny ability to find the soft bits between bone and tissue, and if I have one of my girls in my hand when an intruder comes knocking, she WILL slide ever so effortlessly between ribs and perforate diaphram, weezend or lay a trachea open to the air to make a curious whistling sound. And she'll do it with class and style, because she's a lady.

th03.deviantart.net
 
2013-09-23 05:34:33 PM  

Sid_6.7: This is psychologically fascinating. It also shows that something doesn't have to be human, or even look human, for people to attempt to relate to it.


i35.photobucket.com
 
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