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(Mother Jones)   This is America, Suck it up and quit biatching that you're not as well-off as your parents   (motherjones.com) divider line 438
    More: Interesting, Gen Y, snowflakes, Horatio Alger  
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8272 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Sep 2013 at 1:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-21 11:47:42 AM  
A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.
 
2013-09-21 11:58:35 AM  
About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.
 
2013-09-21 01:26:29 PM  
Fine. But I don't wanna hear any biatching about my generation's use of Obama death panels to thin the Boomer generation so we can reduce our poorer society's medical expenses.
 
2013-09-21 01:43:48 PM  
Jokes on you: my parents are broke too!
 
2013-09-21 01:45:53 PM  
At least my kids won't biatch about this kind of thing because I'll never be able to afford their existence.
 
2013-09-21 01:46:40 PM  
I'm older. I don't give a sh*t about anyone else. All generations can rot, die & go straight to hell. Oh, parents were old-school, dead. Fu*k off.
 
2013-09-21 01:48:55 PM  

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Jokes on you: my parents are broke too!


Goddamit this. After 33 years in a foundry, my dad's pension was cut 2/3rds and his health insurance cancelled. Had to go back to work. fark you republican assholes up your farkin farkholes
 
2013-09-21 01:50:51 PM  

Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.


35 with a PhD, no student loans and check from your farking parents every week? Sounds like you are doing much better than many of your peers. My guess is you also have quite an inheritance coming your way as well

You are one of the very lucky ones and if genuine you are still kind of trolling people like myself and the Boobieser
 
2013-09-21 01:51:09 PM  

Chariset: .  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.


Tell me about it. In my case I made some poor decisions about college and ended up delaying doing anything useful by several years, and it's been a constant Sisyphean struggle to get anywhere with what I have accomplished. I'm lucky to have met Lordfortuna (who has always had a real job out since graduating) or I'd be sharing a house with a bunch of people, most likely. Until I went back to school this second time, he wasn't completely supporting me except for health insurance, but I'm pretty much his dependent at this point which I'm not thrilled about.

Like you though, I at least had money from my grandmother - when she died we discovered she was pretty well off despite her Depression-era thriftiness. So at least we have a decent house instead of renting, it's mostly paid off, and I won't have any student loans once HER house gets sold within a couple of years here. I live in constant fear things will go to hell and I'll be left to fend for myself again.  I was talking to a friend about it and basically if I needed cash fast, I can only put my hands on about a thousand dollars, which doesn't go very far.

Can't help but think we've seen the last of a large middle class unless people turn off the TV/internet and get seriously protesty.
 
2013-09-21 01:51:29 PM  
Just remember, your parents never had internet porn.
 
2013-09-21 01:53:13 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


You sound entitled.

I kid.  The GenXers who got caught in the culling during the recession are no better off.  The only advantage we had was experience.  Many are just now getting back on their feet.  Look at the bright side.  At least you have ten years for things to turn around before you have to scramble like mad to secure your future, unlike my generation.
 
2013-09-21 01:53:36 PM  

Ooba Tooba: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Jokes on you: my parents are broke too!

Goddamit this. After 33 years in a foundry, my dad's pension was cut 2/3rds and his health insurance cancelled. Had to go back to work. fark you republican assholes up your farkin farkholes


Sorry to burst your bubble, but there happen to be two political parties that don't give a rat's ass about you, not just one.
 
2013-09-21 01:55:37 PM  

Kid the Universe: Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.

35 with a PhD, no student loans and check from your farking parents every week? Sounds like you are doing much better than many of your peers. My guess is you also have quite an inheritance coming your way as well

You are one of the very lucky ones and if genuine you are still kind of trolling people like myself and the Boobieser


Boobieser is Boobieser

Auto correct is fun
 
2013-09-21 01:55:43 PM  
 
2013-09-21 01:56:17 PM  
I'm unclear why student debt is anyone's problem but the debtor.

The economy is evolving. Isn't the first time in history this has happened. Maybe it's time to find a path other than $50k in student debt and mediocre grades from a state school in a major no one cares about.

Be an electrician or a miner or a social media baron. But incurring debt and then whining that the world has moved away from print media and the industries it used to support is like screaming about how no one buys buggy whips as Model Ts are whizzing past you.

Adapt or suffer.
 
2013-09-21 01:56:22 PM  
I look around and everyone has a smartphone / tablet / laptop / HDTV / high speed internet / console etc.
 
2013-09-21 01:56:48 PM  

leevis: Ooba Tooba: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Jokes on you: my parents are broke too!

Goddamit this. After 33 years in a foundry, my dad's pension was cut 2/3rds and his health insurance cancelled. Had to go back to work. fark you republican assholes up your farkin farkholes

Sorry to burst your bubble, but there happen to be two political parties that don't give a rat's ass about you, not just one.


Bubble's not bursted. I know they're all dicks. One is quite a bit more dickish than the other.
 
2013-09-21 01:57:05 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.


Meanwhile, I'm turning 34 this year. Paid for college myself, married, two cars, house on 3/4 of an acre, kid on the way, live in MD (high tax state) just outside of DC with full health insurance with minimal co-pays and we put about $500 away each month.

My secret? I didn't go to college for something I WANTED to do. I went to college to get an education in a field where I could MAKE GOOD MONEY. What do I do? I ran restaurants for years and now I work for a company that does food service for private schools. I get weekends, holiday and summer off, all paid. The wife works as an administrative assistant at another private school. Combined we take in just over $106k/year. Not a whole lot in our neck of the woods for combined income, but enough if you're smart with it.

It's not society's fault you didn't look at the market and say, "Where will the jobs be when I graduate." So suck it the fark up and recognize that  it's not the economy, it's not your parents or the baby boomers, it's not society at all. It's YOUR personal decisions that farked you over. You went to too expensive a school to get a degree which wouldn't guarantee you a job because you didn't look at what would be needed.

I quit my job in the middle of the recession and had a new one that paid better with more time off and better benefits in 2 weeks. Why? Because I said to myself "people will always need to eat" and went with it.
 
2013-09-21 01:57:21 PM  
I've never really given it much thought, but I guess it would be pretty farking amazing if Gen Y were winning with the hand the Boomers and my demographic crowd dealt them. I mean, sure, they're clueless naive whiny illiterate uncultured sheltered little assholes... but damn if that isn't beating expectations given who their parents were!

So don't beat yourselves up, millennials or whatever you're called now. You were raised by people who were raised on red dye #5 and Hanna-Barbera cartoons. It's a miracle you can dress yourselves.
 
2013-09-21 01:57:53 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


In a normal economy without statist politicians dicking around with someones ability to hire you.....you would have a job. There are about a hundred emerging markets in technology, resource exploitation, transportation, energy, construction, and infrastructure that are being artificially restrained.

Hell, If i could get bank financing against just the equity I have in my property management holdings....I could farking hire you to do my job while I fark off and sit in a lounge chair. But Dodd-Frank killed my credit rating by changing the way the depreciation schedule in my tax documents must be considered by underwriters. Nothing changed in my business or my ability to pay loans.....but my credit rating dropped by 250 points because underwriters now say I dont have any income at all because my business declares a small loss every year. It used to be that the mark of a well managed real estate holding was the fact that we grew 10% a year without ever showing a profit.

Its the little things they do that kill entire industries. We are literally in a holding pattern, just paying bills and doing maintenance when we could be buying, selling, and renovating. All that potential economic activity killed by hysteria over property flippers and ill willed populism.
 
2013-09-21 01:57:57 PM  

Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.


Stop telling potential employers you have a PhD. Underplaying your qualifications is not the same as lying about stuff you don't have.

My grandmother did this. She was a black woman with a PhD in the 1960's. She rarely told anyone, including her family and certainly not her employers who would have thought she was "uppity" for even claiming such and may not have believed her at all.

When it's time for a raise or a promotion where having an advanced degree can be used as leverage, that's when you spring it on them. Until then, keep it under your hat.
 
2013-09-21 02:01:35 PM  

tallen702: whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.

Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.

Meanwhile, I'm turning 34 this year. Paid for college myself, married, two cars, house on 3/4 of an acre, kid on the way, live in MD (high tax state) just outside of DC with full health insurance with minimal co-pays and we put about $500 away each month.

My secret? ...


Oh you're gonna be popular in this thread.
 
2013-09-21 02:01:42 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


Ha listen to you saying this is all ok.

The government dicking around as you said is also the reason for all the previous complaints.

Deregulation of damn near every aspect of business is the cause of the nightmare you described above.

Same boat as you exactly. Except school is cheaper here in Canada and I paid 1/3 and each of my divorced parents paid a 3rd.
 
2013-09-21 02:05:11 PM  

MoggSquad: I look around and everyone has a smartphone / tablet / laptop / HDTV / high speed internet / console etc.


that stuff should be free
 
2013-09-21 02:05:25 PM  

tallen702: It's not society's fault you didn't look at the market and say, "Where will the jobs be when I graduate."


Stagnant wages however are. Also it is society's fault for things changing as they have. It used to be what your degree was in didn't matter all that much, now for some reason it does yet no one can ever explain why that change happened or why it's a good thing.
 
2013-09-21 02:05:37 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


A-farking-MEN!

We DID what we were told to do: We went to college, and now we are busting our asses JUST to survive. Oh and how DARE we complain that the model we were told to follow has farking failed us!

We aren't wanting to be millionares. We want to go more than just survive, which is damn near impossible when you are drowing in debt!

/class of '05, and have been busting my ass since
//wish i could burn my useless bachelors degree
///Mr mafiageek has a farking Masters degree and is having JUST as hard of a time finding something beyond a farking call center
////considering going to trade-school
 
2013-09-21 02:06:06 PM  
I'm a college senior, and I already know the shiat storm is coming. I'm gonna wear a raincoat.
 
2013-09-21 02:06:20 PM  

nickdaisy: I'm unclear why student debt is anyone's problem but the debtor.


Because e shut up that's why!

People have a RIGHT to a college degree just like they have a RIGHT home ownership, 'free' healthcare etcetcetcetcetcetcetc and someone had better farking pay for it!
 
2013-09-21 02:07:07 PM  

AngryDragon: Oh you're gonna be popular in this thread.


Quiet, asshole, he's telling us THE SECRET!
 
Zel
2013-09-21 02:07:23 PM  
Hanging out on the internet; I guess life's not so bad.
 
2013-09-21 02:07:44 PM  
I read the article.  Made it through the whole thing.

It's easy to tell the author that when you were his age you had to walk ten miles through snow to attend school, uphill both ways.  Or fark, that you had to walk across the room to change the channel.  I resisted the urge to scream "Man up, Nancy" at my computer screen.

But you know what?  He's right.  The American DreamTM was supposed to be about doing better than your parents.  And thanks to two generations of shiatty policy decisions in this country that rigged the system for the wealthy elite, made politics all about who could write the biggest checks, made upward mobility a pipe dream that fewer people can possibly attain every year, made going bankrupt over necessities such as healthcare and education commonplace.

We have left this generation healthcare costs spiraling out of control, education costs spiraling out of control, a planet that is spiraling out of control, and the value of that house you gain to inherit is plummeting.  They are told that if you get caught with a joint you can go to jail for years and ruin your life but if you work on Wall Street and destroy the economy of the country you get a sweet bonus and stock options.

And the politicians who are making decisions for them all are at best well-intentioned but powerless as special interests have made it impossible to look out for the next generation - not when there's a check from big oil to be cashed.

I have an 11-year old kid.  The country and world he is going to live in will be a lot shiattier than the one I got from my parents' generation, and they were the one that helped start this mess.  That may be fodder for jokes from some, but from my vantage point it's a farking tragedy.
 
2013-09-21 02:08:44 PM  

tallen702: It's not society's fault you didn't look at the market and say, "Where will the jobs be when I graduate." So suck it the fark up and recognize that it's not the economy, it's not your parents or the baby boomers, it's not society at all. It's YOUR personal decisions that farked you over. You went to too expensive a school to get a degree which wouldn't guarantee you a job because you didn't look at what would be needed.


This, you lazy bums.  I came to my dad in 1988 and asked for two-hundred-million dollars to start an irregular screw factory.  He only gave me a hundred million dollars.  Did I complain?  No.  Today, that irregular screw company is worth fifty million dollars.  Why can't you be as successful as me?
 
2013-09-21 02:09:04 PM  

archichris: But Dodd-Frank killed my credit rating by changing the way the depreciation schedule in my tax documents must be considered by underwriters. Nothing changed in my business or my ability to pay loans.....but my credit rating dropped by 250 points because underwriters now say I dont have any income at all because my business declares a small loss every year. It used to be that the mark of a well managed real estate holding was the fact that we grew 10% a year without ever showing a profit.


Wait...hold on a second. Dodd Frank was written to protect the little guy from the evil mortgage brokers! You must be confused.
 
2013-09-21 02:09:20 PM  

DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: I'm older. I don't give a sh*t about anyone else. All generations can rot, die & go straight to hell. Oh, parents were old-school, dead. Fu*k off.


files.myopera.com
 
2013-09-21 02:09:28 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


Not being snarky, you are a diamond in a sea of turds. You busted your ass and made something of yourself.

Good on you.
 
2013-09-21 02:09:46 PM  

AngryDragon: tallen702: whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.

Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.

Meanwhile, I'm turning 34 this year. Paid for college myself, married, two cars, house on 3/4 of an acre, kid on the way, live in MD (high tax state) just outside of DC with full health insurance with minimal co-pays and we put about $500 away each month.

...


is your secret a homeschooled wife? gym in 26 minutes?
 
2013-09-21 02:10:43 PM  
I'm 36, have a great job at a great place to work with great health insurance and an okay retirement plan. I have a wife that just finished her PhD with zero debt thanks to scholarships and stipends and is about to start a very awesome postdoc at a top tier research institution.

The last couple of years, I've spent 50-60 days a year on my hobby (performance driving/auto racing), too. That's going to slow down a bit, though because I just had a daughter three days ago that has scored "perfect" with every nurse, doctor, etc that has seen her.

I know I've been lucky and can't complain much. Sorry to those of you that haven't been.
 
2013-09-21 02:11:48 PM  

whistleridge: I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life.


Stockholm Syndrome.

A 40 years ago this was unheard of. Tuition and healthcare were not the burden they are now.

Bend over deeper and beg for more and be glad you serf.
 
2013-09-21 02:11:56 PM  

whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.


You sound entitled.
 
2013-09-21 02:12:15 PM  
All through history, there have been the aristocrats and the peasants.
The American middle class was a freakish anomaly in the history of human economics that lasted for about 40 years then the plutocrats shut that shiat down right quick.

http://www.salon.com/2013/09/20/rip_the_middle_class_1946_2013/

/50, bachelor's degree (the first in my family), students loans on income sensitive repayment, no insurance, no savings, no job, inguinal hernia, plenty of $10 jobs out there.
 
2013-09-21 02:12:48 PM  
Yup all of this, that and the other!!! I'm just hopeing that I keel over at my desk.
 
2013-09-21 02:13:18 PM  
Whatever you do, do not get hurt at work, become partially paralysed, and have the company you worked for weasel out of paying for your hospital bills which leaves you over a million dollars in the hole as far as debt goes.

And then try and rebuild your life and acquire new skill sets and employable skills by going back to college at age 38.

The future looks magnificent...
 
2013-09-21 02:13:47 PM  
Mid twenties. Double major with a 3.0 from a state school (so only 19K in loans - which is not bad for 4 years) who finally got a job in my field (accounting). Money is nice, and after 3 years working craptastic service-sector fields, I am saving like crazy to build up the reserve.

I know my entire working life will be feast or famine and I wish the best of luck to everyone out there who doesn't have what I have. It seriously does suck.

The fact is that student loan debt is REAL and serves as a constant reminder that 18 years of being told to follow your heart and pick the school that suits you no matter the cost was DEAD FARKING WRONG. I don't blame my generation for not knowing how contract law and negative amortization works at age 18; I blame the parents and guidance counselors that shoved that drivel for years because College = Automatic Success.

I do believe that the Boomers showed incredibly poor planning because the current generation of nurses and gerontologists are getting their degrees and some residual anger may result in more than a few life-support plugs getting "accidentally knocked out".
 
2013-09-21 02:14:04 PM  
The lesson being taught is we can't live like our parents because the corporations they worked for aren't interested in us.

Ideally we wouldn't be interested in their products, either, and crash the system. That's probably about 15 years away as boomer start expiring in large numbers and their estates get liquidated to a public that doesn't have the cash to buy their stocks.

The three most dangerous addictions are heroine, refined sugar, and a regular paycheck.
 
2013-09-21 02:14:49 PM  

nickdaisy: I'm unclear why student debt is anyone's problem but the debtor.

The economy is evolving. Isn't the first time in history this has happened. Maybe it's time to find a path other than $50k in student debt and mediocre grades from a state school in a major no one cares about.

Be an electrician or a miner or a social media baron. But incurring debt and then whining that the world has moved away from print media and the industries it used to support is like screaming about how no one buys buggy whips as Model Ts are whizzing past you.

Adapt or suffer.


The problem is that the vast majority of graduates have been saddled with this debt. It's a combination of the twin lies of "Get a degree and you're guaranteed a job for life!" and "Student loans are just part of the process - go for it." It's the same shiatty mentality that got us into trouble in the housing loan crisis. I'm begrudgingly moving forward in the restaurant biz because it's the only stable job with insurance and advancement opportunities I have been able to land.

MoggSquad: I look around and everyone has a smartphone / tablet / laptop / HDTV / high speed internet / console etc.


It sounds like everyone around you is relatively well off - or spending cash on nonessentials to keep up appearances.

/no smartphone
//can't afford the required data plan
 
2013-09-21 02:15:15 PM  

WhyteRaven74: tallen702: It's not society's fault you didn't look at the market and say, "Where will the jobs be when I graduate."

Stagnant wages however are. Also it is society's fault for things changing as they have. It used to be what your degree was in didn't matter all that much, now for some reason it does yet no one can ever explain why that change happened or why it's a good thing.


Specialization is the reason for the degree issue. Stagnant wages can be an issue, but aren't affecting all sectors.
 
2013-09-21 02:15:30 PM  

tallen702: whistleridge: A-farking-men.

I cannot like this post enough. Seriously.

I'm 35, have $55k in student loan debt, and as of this month finally have a salary and health insurance for the first time in my life. And what's going to happen? Congress is going to dick around with my paycheck, just for shiats and giggles.

Let me tell you: the last 15 years haven't been a time of f*ucking off, they've been a nonstop marathon of waiting tables, bartending, getting hired as a subcontractor at an hourly rate but never as a permanent employee, never having benefits or savings, and always living paycheck to paycheck.

I went to college. I have a degree. I bust my ass, usually 60+ hours per week. Bootstrapping is a bullshiat myth, and the people who want to tell me I'm entitled can go fark themselves in the ass with a broken florescent  light bulb.

Chariset: About to turn 35.  I have a PhD and can't find a teaching job.  I also can't find an ordinary job since no one will hire a person with a PhD.

Health insurance is a pipe dream.  Retirement is... I don't even know what.  It's not going to happen.  I'll have to just quietly die somewhere once I can't work.  I finally have some savings but they're going to go straight into the car or some other major expense.  The credit card is probably at  level within reason, but it's high enough to make me unhappy.  I did get my student loans paid off, but only because my grandmother gave me money from the sale of a piece of property.

I'm tired of feeling like I've failed.  Generations before me had a house and a family and a steady job at 35, and look at me -- still renting, still taking a monthly check from my parents, and wondering when I'm finally going to start living.

Meanwhile, I'm turning 34 this year. Paid for college myself, married, two cars, house on 3/4 of an acre, kid on the way, live in MD (high tax state) just outside of DC with full health insurance with minimal co-pays and we put about $500 away each month.

My secret? ...


Amen brother. I put an architecture degree on a shelf and went into property management because I didnt want to sit at a desk making fark-all an hour making construction documents. This aint a glamorous job , and like i said earlier, Dodd-Frank has almost killed the particular niche market we service. But people need a place to live and we gross almost a million a year doing it. Family business too, so its pretty much just two of us managing it all.

I worked through college, at a state university and paid about $40,000 for my degree plus expenses, made it without loans with help from my parents. Now I pay them back by maintaining a 98% occupancy rate on our rental units. I make about $25k in lease sales a month on new leases to accomplish that. But when im not doing the easy stuff like managing a website, meeting new customers for walk-thru's, taking marketing photos and drawing up floor plans..... Im driving around in a work truck doing carpentry, plumbing and construction management.

Life is what you make of it, if you're 35 and you haven't yet made a career, your mistake is likely that you are waiting for someone to offer you the chance at a career.

Sociology majors, psychology majors, English majors, history majors, art majors, etc.....  That is the pool of laborers you have to rise above to be successful. You arent even competing with minimum wage slaves unless you allow yourself to.
 
2013-09-21 02:15:53 PM  
My father picked his ass up and moved to this country from Brazil worked his ass off 12 hours a day, 6 days a week, never took a vacation, never retired, and fell underwater on his house.

But it was all worth it so his kids could live in America, go to college and rack up debt they'll never pay off, and buy their own house they'll be underwater in for a considerable amount of time in jobs that pay so little it will never allow us to save.

At least my wife and I are smart enough to not have children. Can't afford that.
 
2013-09-21 02:17:25 PM  
I don't think everyone would be so pissed about our decline if we would have made the last 20 years worthwhile.  It seems we as a nation have just been blowing money on stupid sh*t we don't really need for our collective kitchen.

The trillion dollar collectable Iraqi plate set doesn't seem to go with our overpriced healthcare beanie babies collection.
 
2013-09-21 02:17:37 PM  

ladyfortuna: when she died we discovered she was pretty well off despite her Depression-era thriftiness


you may have hit upon why she was pretty well off.

I do like the author commenting on what I call the XY-generation 77-79.  I was born in '79 (makes me 34 today) and I know generational cut-offs are not hard and fast, but XY'ers are unique in-and-of-themselves.  Grew up with the rise of computers so we are understand technology quite well and know the roots of it, better than GenY (ie- can probably use DOS commands, know how to find the c:\ drive and master a smartphone at the same time) and we got the angst of the '90's but didn't experience it full-force like Gen X.  We entered the work force from about 1998-2002 at the end of tech bubble, so we were able to get jobs.  The problem came when the decade moved on either we lost our jobs or were stuck with no promotional opportunities or raises.  Not getting raises in the start of your career really stalls the exponential growth part of saving and earning power for the latter part of our careers.

I can't complain too much compared to some of the others in here, but I still feel like I am less successful/well-off compared to my parents and not on stable ground and a life-event can knock me out at anytime.  make 70k, few years into a 15 year mortgage, less than 4k in student loan debts, average credit debt (thank god for 0% APR offers/balance transfers) and my wife can stay-at-home with my 15 month son.  I know I am lucky to a degree, but don't really feel like I have made it either.
 
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