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(The Atlantic)   High schools routinely pay more for sports than they do for important things like Math, Science, and English, so the thing we need to do is abolish high school sports   (theatlantic.com) divider line 210
    More: Hero, high schools, Advanced Placement, eighth graders, collegiate sports, American Life, pick-up game, private schools, cultural center  
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9648 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Sep 2013 at 2:47 AM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-20 11:46:25 PM
Okay, she makes an excellent case with facts and stuff, but I'll bet I could kick her ass. And really, isn't that what success is all about?
 
2013-09-20 11:49:39 PM
Physical activity is as important to good development in kids as reading.
 
2013-09-20 11:51:13 PM

CPT Ethanolic: Physical activity is as important to good development in kids as reading.


As TFA says, you can have physical education without having expensive competitive sports programs that are provided for a very small minority of the students.
 
2013-09-20 11:52:34 PM
You can teach all the math 0-calc wit a $1.00's worth of chalk on a sidewalk. You can't do any kind of swimming related activities with a whole class without a million dollar pool.
 
2013-09-21 12:08:25 AM
That's been quite obvious for a long time. Allen, Texas laughs at your shenanigans
 
2013-09-21 12:28:43 AM
Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.

Those that tell great stories are the ones that are the most popular
 
2013-09-21 12:31:24 AM

cman: Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.

Those that tell great stories are the ones that are the most popular


But those dumb bastards wind up in Congress, and then we're all screwed
 
2013-09-21 12:33:01 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: cman: Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.

Those that tell great stories are the ones that are the most popular

But those dumb bastards wind up in Congress, and then we're all screwed


Those bastards are much better public speakers

Smart people can be very socially awkward
 
2013-09-21 12:36:04 AM

cman: Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.


Which gets to the heart of the matter.

Communities love to sit on their asses and watch other people compete. They take such pride in sitting on their asses and watching other people compete that they'll cover up rape and child molestation (just for recent news stories) to protect the team members that entertain them as they sit on their asses.

You can do that without the education system getting involved. If you'll pay $100/month to watch television, you can fund your own sports organizations and use schools for education.
 
2013-09-21 12:38:24 AM

cman: Those bastards are much better public speakers

Smart people can be very socially awkward


Bill Clinton did ok

/for a Rhodes Scholar, anyway
 
2013-09-21 12:41:38 AM
Drive through Texas on a Friday night and try to find a radio station, not broadcasting a local football game.
 
2013-09-21 12:44:41 AM
Here's the thing: kids who are involved in the arts, are more likely to continue in a career in the arts, than young athletes are going to make a career in their chosen sport. Not all of them are going to be YoYo Ma by any means, but kids who are involved in music, will more likely continue in a related field, and actually use their musical training in their careers, just as young artists will more likely go into a field that reflects that interest, as opposed to high school linebackers who will then go into the pros. Or even see the inside of a professional stadium even as a trainer.

Athletics IS important. Discipline, physical training, and learning teamwork, those are important. Dance likewise does some of the same things--and more dancers go on to professional work, even as teachers.

The problem is that folks come out to in bigger droves, and parents throw wads of cash, and there is a clamor for the spectacle of a home game. Mind you, a lot of the kids in the band that performs there will continue on in related musical fields, more so than the student athletes.

Funding the arts is as important as funding extracurricular sports. Funding the basics like math and science is even more important, as they are sort of a core to the curriculum. The problem is that parents don't get as hett up about math tests, as they do about home games. They don't get as excited when "mathletes" go on to nationals. Band parents...they get uppity, and since there is crossover with the sports events, and the pageantry that goes into band competitions, they get a bone thrown to them.

The key is balance. Yes, sports are important. Even if the IOC seems bent on erasing wrestling, it's a damn hard sport, and damned if I see a fair amount of wrestlers at the gym, who I spar with on occasion, and most of the ones I get paired up with, are damn hard opponents. It's good training. Running, not the most exciting sport, but with long term benefits. Dance, the same. That straddles the line between athleticism and art, and that folks seem to think of arts as an easy elective, which means that they've never seen dancers train and practice. Some the hardest working athletes I've met were dancers, and that kind of dedication to craft, was often in spite of the resources that they had to draw on at a school level. We need to be looking not just at the esteem, but also at very real world outcomes. 86ing sports isn't really the way to look at things, but maybe investing more into the arts, as well as other extracurriculars for those with more scholastic bent--yes, I'm looking at the school paper, or other activities--and you are looking at better prepared students, who have varied experiences. And oddly enough, a lot of kids do MORE than just one extracurricular. Our high school soccer team didn't just go to state finals fair often, but a lot of those players were also in the band, on the math and science team, and more than a few were likewise involved in the school paper, yearbook, and even those pesky drama productions. It's not THIS vs THAT. Students aren't just simply about ONE activity, and treating students as if they are simply one dimensional cut outs doesn't represent most extracurricular programs.
 
2013-09-21 12:46:36 AM
What we need are more after-school sports like choir or drama, so people can learn to express themselves properly, by singing or pretending to be a tree. Have you ever heard a whale sing? It's a lonely form of beauty and some very ancient wisdom. Helping people to help themselves with drama and choir and flowers and my dad's money.
 
2013-09-21 12:50:06 AM
i262.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-21 12:50:32 AM
I remember the last time my high school sold out the Mathletes competition. Plus, the revenue from ther GE Computer Science Competition concessions was astronomical.
 
2013-09-21 12:51:31 AM

Lenny_da_Hog: cman: Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.

Which gets to the heart of the matter.

Communities love to sit on their asses and watch other people compete. They take such pride in sitting on their asses and watching other people compete that they'll cover up rape and child molestation (just for recent news stories) to protect the team members that entertain them as they sit on their asses.

You can do that without the education system getting involved. If you'll pay $100/month to watch television, you can fund your own sports organizations and use schools for education.


Yes, there can be an ugly side to fandom, but it can also do a lot of good.  Schools that have a lot of community support, which often stems from athletic events, tend to be much more well supported.  If parents, alumni, and community members are coming to the campus to watch games on a regular basis they're more likely to vote for referendums to fund the schools, and to speak out if the school starts to fall into disrepair.

The big example the article game, a tiny, poor, about to be shut down school district, isn't representative of most American schools.  In their case the decision seems to have made sense.  If a district can't even afford to keep a middle school open and has to shutter the science labs because of untreated mold, they have bigger fish to fry than fielding a football team.

On the other hand you have districts with more than enough money who have no trouble coming up with the cash for sports programs without cutting corners in academic areas.  There are also other big draws on school budgets these days that weren't there before.  NCLB has created a huge problem for many schools and districts, which has been compounded with a huge increase in the number of students labeled as learning disabled who twenty or thirty years ago would have been considered completely mainstream.  Special Ed teachers, reading specialists to prepare for state tests, IEPs, etc, all cost a ton of money.

Comparing graduation rates is also difficult because there are many difference between the US and South Korean education systems, as well as huge differences culturally and socioeconomically.  The biggest factors in play when it comes to educational success or failure are economic status, parental involvement, and somewhat related to that point, the educational achievement of the student's parents.  Generational poverty and a culture amongst many families that doesn't value education are both bigger impacts than sports programs.

The author brings up some good points, and I'd even agree that sports programs are over-emphasized in some schools.  However, the premise that eliminating sports programs would be some kind of educational panacea across the board doesn't seem to hold water.  Plus, those programs are already so ingrained in our culture that I don't see any push to downsize or eliminate them in a large scale ever gaining traction.
 
2013-09-21 01:01:59 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Yes, there can be an ugly side to fandom, but it can also do a lot of good.  Schools that have a lot of community support, which often stems from athletic events, tend to be much more well supported.  If parents, alumni, and community members are coming to the campus to watch games on a regular basis they're more likely to vote for referendums to fund the schools, and to speak out if the school starts to fall into disrepair.


Read TFA. The school shown as an example has had an increase in interest from the community:

That first semester, 80 percent of the students passed their classes, compared with 50 percent the previous fall. About 160 people attended parent-teacher night, compared with six the year before.
 
2013-09-21 01:07:21 AM

Lenny_da_Hog: TuteTibiImperes: Yes, there can be an ugly side to fandom, but it can also do a lot of good.  Schools that have a lot of community support, which often stems from athletic events, tend to be much more well supported.  If parents, alumni, and community members are coming to the campus to watch games on a regular basis they're more likely to vote for referendums to fund the schools, and to speak out if the school starts to fall into disrepair.

Read TFA. The school shown as an example has had an increase in interest from the community:

That first semester, 80 percent of the students passed their classes, compared with 50 percent the previous fall. About 160 people attended parent-teacher night, compared with six the year before.


Which may have been for any number of reasons. Sure, it may be related to canceling sports programs, or it might not.  Maybe they came to biatch about athletics being cut.  Maybe amongst the other initiatives the started communicating with parents more effectively and drew a larger crowd.  It seems odd, however, to think that a parent would think 'they have a football team, so I'm not going to the conference'.
 
2013-09-21 01:09:50 AM

CPT Ethanolic: Physical activity is as important to good development in kids as reading.


At least two high school kids have died playing football in the last month. I don't see how people shrug it off, but they do. Dying from a undiagnosed heart defect while playing basketball is one thing, but getting your neck snapped or brain smooshed is not what I'd call good development.
#1
#2
 
2013-09-21 01:15:50 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Lenny_da_Hog: TuteTibiImperes: Yes, there can be an ugly side to fandom, but it can also do a lot of good.  Schools that have a lot of community support, which often stems from athletic events, tend to be much more well supported.  If parents, alumni, and community members are coming to the campus to watch games on a regular basis they're more likely to vote for referendums to fund the schools, and to speak out if the school starts to fall into disrepair.

Read TFA. The school shown as an example has had an increase in interest from the community:

That first semester, 80 percent of the students passed their classes, compared with 50 percent the previous fall. About 160 people attended parent-teacher night, compared with six the year before.

Which may have been for any number of reasons. Sure, it may be related to canceling sports programs, or it might not.  Maybe they came to biatch about athletics being cut.  Maybe amongst the other initiatives the started communicating with parents more effectively and drew a larger crowd.  It seems odd, however, to think that a parent would think 'they have a football team, so I'm not going to the conference'.


But it's not odd to think that members of the community see their education system as an entertainment system first and foremost -- Newspapers dedicate entire sections and multiple reporters to cover high school sports alone.

When that air of entertainment is removed and people realize schools are there to prepare generations kids to survive as adults, they might take it more seriously.
 
2013-09-21 02:04:16 AM

Triumph: CPT Ethanolic: Physical activity is as important to good development in kids as reading.

At least two high school kids have died playing football in the last month. I don't see how people shrug it off, but they do. Dying from a undiagnosed heart defect while playing basketball is one thing, but getting your neck snapped or brain smooshed is not what I'd call good development.
#1
#2


well, at least we wont waste any more money on those kids ...
 
2013-09-21 02:04:39 AM

cman: Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.

Those that tell great stories are the ones that are the most popular


Can you explain to me why ordinary citizens really care about high school sports? Idiot people who are so invested in college sports make some sense to me. But that seems slightly more reasonable than those who are obsessed with sports teams whose players, in high school,  who aren't even of legal age.
 
2013-09-21 02:44:56 AM

Philbb: cman: Humans have a need to compete and win

A good game of basketball is far more entertaining than a mathlete tournament.

Those that tell great stories are the ones that are the most popular

Can you explain to me why ordinary citizens really care about high school sports? Idiot people who are so invested in college sports make some sense to me. But that seems slightly more reasonable than those who are obsessed with sports teams whose players, in high school,  who aren't even of legal age.


In a town of 100,000, we still ask what high school they attended and can remember how my school crushed yours for the bell, cannon, whatever, for that year. Please, just bag my groceries.
 
2013-09-21 02:51:40 AM
Seems a little bit disingenuous to count facilities expenditure as a cost for athletics but not for academics.

But yeah, we could probably do with less athletic spending and more academic spending.
 
2013-09-21 02:53:17 AM

Lenny_da_Hog: [i262.photobucket.com image 850x478]


Assuming that's real, that explains a lot.

I went to the grocery tonight and was wondering where everyone was or was going since it seemed strangely quiet in my neighborhood. Then I heard the marching band from about .4 miles away and remembered: FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS. Gah.

So glad I'm moving out of this town next year... It's like living in Ohio sometimes.

/born in Ohio
//never ever living there again
 
2013-09-21 02:58:53 AM

ladyfortuna: Lenny_da_Hog: [i262.photobucket.com image 850x478]

Assuming that's real, that explains a lot.

I went to the grocery tonight and was wondering where everyone was or was going since it seemed strangely quiet in my neighborhood. Then I heard the marching band from about .4 miles away and remembered: FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS. Gah.

So glad I'm moving out of this town next year... It's like living in Ohio sometimes.

/born in Ohio
//never ever living there again


Seriously. I live in Columbus and the only good thing about saturdays is that it's easy to get anywhere because all the OSU drones are too busy stuffing chicken wings and and cock into eachother to be out driving like morons on the roadway.
 
2013-09-21 03:01:04 AM
So, who remembers the story about the High School football player who was blown to hell by a cannon made in the shop class, and his family got threats and nasty messages because townsfolk were scared his family would put an end to the cannon tradition?

As a nerd: screw school sports. Seriously. Give us new, up to date textbooks! The USSR was still on pulldown maps when I was in middle school, for god's sake! Give us up to date computers! Put more books in the library and ban no books at all!

Put emphasis on learning! It's a school!

/had a coworker who was allowed to grade his own tests so he could continue to play football in high school
 
2013-09-21 03:01:12 AM
i.imgur.com

Eagle Stadium - Home of the Allen High School Eagles

Seats 18000 (the town has a population of approximately 84000)

Cost to build: 59.6 million dollars.
 
2013-09-21 03:02:53 AM

neongoats: ladyfortuna: Lenny_da_Hog: [i262.photobucket.com image 850x478]

Assuming that's real, that explains a lot.

I went to the grocery tonight and was wondering where everyone was or was going since it seemed strangely quiet in my neighborhood. Then I heard the marching band from about .4 miles away and remembered: FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS. Gah.

So glad I'm moving out of this town next year... It's like living in Ohio sometimes.

/born in Ohio
//never ever living there again

Seriously. I live in Columbus and the only good thing about saturdays is that it's easy to get anywhere because all the OSU drones are too busy stuffing chicken wings and and cock into eachother to be out driving like morons on the roadway.


I love the Dead Schembechlers.
 
2013-09-21 03:02:58 AM
They should try to find a way to make them symbiotic. I still remember showing kids how to be scorekeepers and prepare our team's baseball stats. I bet real teachers could do much more, drawing a lesson plan around how the team did last week, or whatever. It seems like it would be a good way to keep kids interested.
 
2013-09-21 03:08:19 AM
Jocks do get preferential treatment, and they usually get the hot girls. But the nerds win the talent contests with their combination of quirkly yet lovable dance moves and witty computer animation.
 
2013-09-21 03:09:30 AM
Substitute teacher for game day? Hotels and meals for everyone? Where the fark is this?
 
2013-09-21 03:10:58 AM

violentsalvation: They should try to find a way to make them symbiotic. I still remember showing kids how to be scorekeepers and prepare our team's baseball stats. I bet real teachers could do much more, drawing a lesson plan around how the team did last week, or whatever. It seems like it would be a good way to keep kids interested.


I can see that. Physics and calculus are very sports related. You could even get some history tie ins with battle strategy, etc. But its still all going to fall apart because the fooseball coach is going to be making 3x what the physics professor makes because: HURPYDURP

Look at every useless farking MBA holding wanker with no actual job skills but schmoozing. I think every single one of them were high school sports "heroes".
 
2013-09-21 03:14:38 AM

jayphat: Substitute teacher for game day? Hotels and meals for everyone? Where the fark is this?


It probably depends on the state.  In small states, or those with dense populations, it's pretty easy to arrange the majority of games as after school trips via bus.  When you get into large states with spread out populations centers, that isn't always feasible.
 
2013-09-21 03:15:00 AM

ladyfortuna: Lenny_da_Hog: [i262.photobucket.com image 850x478]

Assuming that's real, that explains a lot.

I went to the grocery tonight and was wondering where everyone was or was going since it seemed strangely quiet in my neighborhood. Then I heard the marching band from about .4 miles away and remembered: FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS. Gah.

So glad I'm moving out of this town next year... It's like living in Ohio sometimes.

/born in Ohio
//never ever living there again


Ohio is a good place to be from.

Far from.

/went to HS in the Rust Belt there, myself.
 
2013-09-21 03:16:42 AM

Shostie: Helping people to help themselves with drama and choir and flowers and my dad's money.


Nah that's stupid.  It's a far better use of your dad's money to teach kids how to play with a ball.
 
2013-09-21 03:22:07 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Schools that have a lot of community support, which often stems from athletic events, tend to be much more well supported.


Actually, community support often stems from money in a community. In communities that spend most of their time focusing on sports (which is far, far, far, FAR more common than you seem to want to believe), the schools suffer. Local referendums on increased numbers of teachers (read: class sizes below 30) fall on deaf ears, but a local bond measure for a few million dollars on a local football stadium upgrade? NOT A PROBLEM.

TuteTibiImperes: If parents, alumni, and community members are coming to the campus to watch games on a regular basis they're more likely to vote for referendums to fund the schools


No.

TuteTibiImperes: The big example the article game, a tiny, poor, about to be shut down school district, isn't representative of most American schools


An entire school district shutting down? Not so common. LARGE numbers of schools closing and consolidating? Yeah, that's actually really happening in this country.

TuteTibiImperes: There are also other big draws on school budgets these days that weren't there before. NCLB has created a huge problem for many schools and districts, which has been compounded with a huge increase in the number of students labeled as learning disabled who twenty or thirty years ago would have been considered completely mainstream. Special Ed teachers, reading specialists to prepare for state tests, IEPs, etc, all cost a ton of money.


Yes!

TuteTibiImperes: However, the premise that eliminating sports programs would be some kind of educational panacea across the board doesn't seem to hold water.


Nobody is saying youth athletics would come to an end in this country. Cutting direct ties with schools, on the other hand, is a perfectly sensible idea. Yes, corruption exists in the AAU, but it also exists with private schools in larger cities.
 
2013-09-21 03:24:10 AM

Ringshadow: So, who remembers the story about the High School football player who was blown to hell by a cannon made in the shop class, and his family got threats and nasty messages because townsfolk were scared his family would put an end to the cannon tradition?


That's just insane!

FTA:
Callers and visitors told Karch they would "make sure his other leg got blown off," and that "there would be retaliation" if the family cooperated in an investigation that could end the cannon tradition, said Mary Bissel, Karch's mother. "That's when I kind of got a little upset," Karch said.
The threats also included mention the family would be "banned from the town," Bissell said. She's been warned not to talk to a lawyer, or reporters.

/Seems like some people take high school sports and the trappings that surround them way too seriously.
 
2013-09-21 03:24:44 AM

neongoats: violentsalvation: They should try to find a way to make them symbiotic. I still remember showing kids how to be scorekeepers and prepare our team's baseball stats. I bet real teachers could do much more, drawing a lesson plan around how the team did last week, or whatever. It seems like it would be a good way to keep kids interested.

I can see that. Physics and calculus are very sports related. You could even get some history tie ins with battle strategy, etc. But its still all going to fall apart because the fooseball coach is going to be making 3x what the physics professor makes because: HURPYDURP

Look at every useless farking MBA holding wanker with no actual job skills but schmoozing. I think every single one of them were high school sports "heroes".


At the college level athletics are a strong recruiting tool (even for students that won't be playing sports themselves, it's an element of the social atmosphere that helps draw applications), a good fundraising tool (it brings alumni back to campus more often, helps foster a continuing relationship with the school, and makes people more willing to open their wallets) and at the top end can be net money makers, at least for revenue sports such as football, basketball, and in some cases baseball and hockey.

The money earned from revenue sports only goes to offset the money losing sports (in most cases any women's sport, plus things like soccer, track and field, golf, swimming, etc) but Title IX requires equal opportunity for female athletes, and NCAA regulations require a certain number of sports to be fielded according to which division you play in.

Given that, paying a BCS level college football coach $3,000,000 per year isn't unreasonable if the school nets that much or more from tickets, concessions, and parking at a single home game.
 
2013-09-21 03:25:31 AM
There are good extracurricular programs in high schools: music, Beta Club, 4H, various comp sci clubs. Even track and field. What isn't good is a system that teaches kids that it is ok to beat the living shiat out of each other and that they are inherently better because of their ability to all but kill someone and throw a ball. Oh, and they need not worry about their grades--the coaches will take care of that formality.

I was in choir and what was called Quiz Bowl (team captain two years in a row, no less). I learned fairly quickly that jocks are idiots and are far too full of themselves to be successful in the long-term. Look at 40-year-old former football players--reduced to shilling for boner pills because throwing a ball doesn't translate well into a useful skill after a knee blows out.

Now I can discuss at length the history of the French Revolution and the Rennaisance. The high school quarterback I graduated with? Flipping burgers while his ex-cheerleader wife gets fatter with the four kids at home.
 
2013-09-21 03:29:02 AM
Cut HS sports?

How are these kids supposed to make any money when they get to college?
 
2013-09-21 03:32:15 AM
Exercise like cardio is good for your brain. Weight lifting is not cardio exercise. Running for ten seconds or five yards is not cardio, you need at least 15 minutes of elevated heart rate. Getting hit in the head is not good for your brain. Concussions are not good for your brain.
 
2013-09-21 03:33:42 AM
How about using a pay to play system? Make them use fees and donations for the sports budgets.
 
2013-09-21 03:33:53 AM

CPT Ethanolic: Physical activity is as important to good development in kids as reading.


Americas galloping obesity problem laughs at your statement while stuffing Happy meals down its gravy slicked gullet.
 
2013-09-21 03:35:23 AM

Jim_Callahan: Seems a little bit disingenuous to count facilities expenditure as a cost for athletics but not for academics.

But yeah, we could probably do with less athletic spending and more academic spending.


Except that the entertainment facilities are not used for education. Just entertainment.

Would the schools be better academically if the money currently being spent on entertainment was spent on education? Of course.

/gym/health/exercising the student body is a different discussion.

maram500: throwing a ball doesn't translate well into a useful skill after a knee blows out.


In the end, the school system is just one gigantic feeder system for professional sports.

Can we ask a different question?
Why does High School football still exist?
Why hasnt it been sued out of existence by the parents of kids who have had concussions?
We know for a fact that brain injuries have massive life destroying affects and yet it continues.
 
2013-09-21 03:35:37 AM
FEWTBAWL is like one of the most sacred things in the american psyche.
 
2013-09-21 03:35:54 AM

puffy999: TuteTibiImperes: Schools that have a lot of community support, which often stems from athletic events, tend to be much more well supported.

Actually, community support often stems from money in a community. In communities that spend most of their time focusing on sports (which is far, far, far, FAR more common than you seem to want to believe), the schools suffer. Local referendums on increased numbers of teachers (read: class sizes below 30) fall on deaf ears, but a local bond measure for a few million dollars on a local football stadium upgrade? NOT A PROBLEM.


Well, I'm mainly speaking from the experience of working for a school district where that was the case.  Smallish school district, serving a mostly rural and suburban area, mostly middle class folks (more houses than apartments and trailers, but not McMansions or gated communities), and everything kept pretty local.  There was one high school in the district, and the stadium was packed for every game, most of the town came out.  They had a sense of pride in the school, and compared to other schools in the area, it was state of the art, recently remodeled, media rooms, huge band room with acoustic paneling, a professional level stage with a modern auditorium, new computers, and everything was kept clean and in good repair.

A high school not more than ten miles away in a different district was a completely different story - little community involvement, a building that hadn't been touched since the 80s, older computers, missing tiles on the floor and stained panels on the ceiling, etc.

The first school felt like a place that valued students and put a high priority on education, the second felt institutional.

I'm not saying athletics were the only difference, but at the first school they clearly helped drive involvement from the community, which helped make a huge difference.
 
2013-09-21 03:36:05 AM

TuteTibiImperes: It probably depends on the state. In small states, or those with dense populations, it's pretty easy to arrange the majority of games as after school trips via bus.


Oregon's school athletics association went from 4 to 6 divisions in sports within the last decade (absolutely absurd for a state with such a small population). By doing this SIMPLY FOR "fairness" and "competitive balance," they not only created a number of schools that have to travel much longer distances for sporting events compared to before, but they've significantly increased expenditures on gas and the like from nearly every district. Yes, it makes the "little schools" in the Portland area feel better, but the state is a lot larger than Portland Metro.

I went to a high school that was relatively isolated from the rest of the division (all other teams, save one, were in Eugene/Springfield). Currently, my former HS has less travel time (which is uncommon) as they were downgraded a division due to a decrease in students, but those schools in Eugene have been broken up and many of them now must travel over some of the state's most dangerous mountain passes during the winter.
 
2013-09-21 03:36:55 AM
I have a novel idea, how about everyone goes to school to learn and then get their exercise after school when they are outside playing and doing things?
 
2013-09-21 03:37:28 AM

Snapper Carr: [i.imgur.com image 800x499]

Eagle Stadium - Home of the Allen High School Eagles

Seats 18000 (the town has a population of approximately 84000)

Cost to build: 59.6 million dollars.




Who paid for it? Bonds? Taxes ? Donations?
 
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