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(Yahoo)   Unfortunately Curiosity hasn't sniffed any farts on Mars   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 19
    More: Sad, methane, NASA, Mount Sharp, Four Corners, Planetary Society, Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, rovers  
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905 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Sep 2013 at 8:32 AM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-20 08:51:37 AM
Because, like Girls, Martians don't fart.
 
2013-09-20 09:12:39 AM
If a fart occurs and no one is there to have smelt it, does it mean that said fart has not been dealt?
 
2013-09-20 09:20:29 AM
They should call in an expert on methane just to be sure.

s12.postimg.org
 
2013-09-20 09:26:30 AM
s21.postimg.org

Pull my finger
 
2013-09-20 09:28:43 AM
I'm guessing Curiosity isn't close to the buggalo ranches.
 
2013-09-20 11:19:10 AM
Our geology mission hasn't detected any life. YA THINK!?
 
2013-09-20 11:46:56 AM
Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?

What IS it smelling?

It's an entirely different biology, altogether.
 
2013-09-20 11:56:09 AM
That's because they aren't looking in the right places. Curiosity has very bad sensitivity to detecting Methane, and unless they're right on a hotspot during the right season, they won't detect it.

This should be common knowledge, but instead the media is ignorant or heavily downplaying the near certainty that there is some form of life on Mars.

FTFA-

Just because Curiosity didn't detect methane near its landing site doesn't mean the gas is not present elsewhere on the planet, said Bill Nye, chief executive of the Planetary Society, a space advocacy group.
"Suppose you're an alien coming to Earth and you landed in the Four Corners area, would you feel as if you've explored the Earth?" he said.
 
2013-09-20 12:07:41 PM

Tenga: Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?

What IS it smelling?

It's an entirely different biology, altogether.


This was kinda my thought. It seems a little earthcentric to assume that the life found elsewhere will be inhaling and or exhaling similar stuff to us.

And they say that the constant radiation on mars would make it impossible for life to survive on the surface. Could life not have developed to feed on that radiation? Maybe mars microbes farkin love that radiation.
 
2013-09-20 12:26:28 PM

Tenga: Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?

What IS it smelling?

It's an entirely different biology, altogether.


It's an entirely different biology
 
2013-09-20 12:50:44 PM

Shrugging Atlas: Tenga: Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?

What IS it smelling?

It's an entirely different biology, altogether.

It's an entirely different biology


It's an entirely different biology
 
2013-09-20 01:27:44 PM

Tenga: Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?


If it's different only 1 AU away, why do we believe that matter behaves the same outside the Solar System? What are our instruments concluding from the light emitted from other stars?
 
2013-09-20 01:52:48 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Tenga: Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?

If it's different only 1 AU away, why do we believe that matter behaves the same outside the Solar System? What are our instruments concluding from the light emitted from other stars?


There all about life similar to ours, but the probability is that any life out there is going to be astonishingly different from ours.

They probably scan our solar system and say " There can't be life on that third planet because water there seems to be in some bizzare liquid state".
 
2013-09-20 01:59:59 PM

Tenga: Quantum Apostrophe: Tenga: Why must we have to believe that matter breaks down the same way as Earth life?

If it's different only 1 AU away, why do we believe that matter behaves the same outside the Solar System? What are our instruments concluding from the light emitted from other stars?

There all about life similar to ours, but the probability is that any life out there is going to be astonishingly different from ours.

They probably scan our solar system and say " There can't be life on that third planet because water there seems to be in some bizzare  bizarre liquid state".



FTFM
 
2013-09-20 02:57:39 PM

justtray: That's because they aren't looking in the right places. Curiosity has very bad sensitivity to detecting Methane, and unless they're right on a hotspot during the right season, they won't detect it.


The atmosphere of Mars is (of course) very dynamic.  While it is fair to speculate that some type of microbe consuming the methane which would explain why over millions of years the atmosphere is not full of methane it is extremely unlikely that all of that methane is contained at some local hot spot and not spread over the entire surface.

One of the study's co-authors, Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, said the fact that so little methane was found in the atmosphere strongly suggested very little was being produced.
"There's no known way for methane to disappear quickly from the atmosphere," Atreya said.
"Methane is persistent. It would last for hundreds of years in the Martian atmosphere.
"Without a way to take it out of the atmosphere quicker, our measurements indicate there cannot be much methane being put into the atmosphere by any mechanism, whether biology, geology or by ultraviolet degradation of organics delivered by the fall of meteorites or interplanetary dust particles."


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-nasa-rover-hint-methane-mars.html#jCp F rom a better article:
One of the study's co-authors, Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, said the fact that so little methane was found in the atmosphere strongly suggested very little was being produced.
"There's no known way for methane to disappear quickly from the atmosphere," Atreya said.
"Methane is persistent. It would last for hundreds of years in the Martian atmosphere.
"Without a way to take it out of the atmosphere quicker, our measurements indicate there cannot be much methane being put into the atmosphere by any mechanism, whether biology, geology or by ultraviolet degradation of organics delivered by the fall of meteorites or interplanetary dust particles."

Here is a talk which explains why we previous claims of observations of methane on Mars are dubious.
 
2013-09-20 02:59:30 PM

rwfan: justtray: That's because they aren't looking in the right places. Curiosity has very bad sensitivity to detecting Methane, and unless they're right on a hotspot during the right season, they won't detect it.

The atmosphere of Mars is (of course) very dynamic.  While it is fair to speculate that some type of microbe consuming the methane which would explain why over millions of years the atmosphere is not full of methane it is extremely unlikely that all of that methane is contained at some local hot spot and not spread over the entire surface.

One of the study's co-authors, Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, said the fact that so little methane was found in the atmosphere strongly suggested very little was being produced.
"There's no known way for methane to disappear quickly from the atmosphere," Atreya said.
"Methane is persistent. It would last for hundreds of years in the Martian atmosphere.
"Without a way to take it out of the atmosphere quicker, our measurements indicate there cannot be much methane being put into the atmosphere by any mechanism, whether biology, geology or by ultraviolet degradation of organics delivered by the fall of meteorites or interplanetary dust particles."


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-nasa-rover-hint-methane-mars.html#jCp F rom a better article:
One of the study's co-authors, Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, said the fact that so little methane was found in the atmosphere strongly suggested very little was being produced.
"There's no known way for methane to disappear quickly from the atmosphere," Atreya said.
"Methane is persistent. It would last for hundreds of years in the Martian atmosphere.
"Without a way to take it out of the atmosphere quicker, our measurements indicate there cannot be much methane being put into the atmosphere by any mechanism, whether biology, geology or by ultraviolet degradation of organics delivered by the fall of meteorites or interplanetary dust particles."

Here i ...


it pays to preview.
 
2013-09-20 03:15:41 PM

Tenga: There all about life similar to ours, but the probability is that any life out there is going to be astonishingly different from ours.


Why? Will chemical elements behave differently there? Does hydrogen? Stars behave the same, light behaves the same, gravity will be the same, chemical reactions happen the same, but somehow life will be massively different from here?

I believe in the principle of mediocrity, that is there is nothing really special about us, and there isn't anything different out there. Every single astronomical observation works on the principle that physical laws will be the same over there, otherwise what are these particles that are entering our sensors?

We have every single stable chemical element right here on Earth. We see on our other planets what happens when you have different ratios and conditions. ie, no one's looking for vestiges of the condos of the lost Venusians.

My opinion is that life will be largely Earth-like within the bounds of "normal" gravity, and that life probably isn't any more diverse or different from us, anymore than we are different from any life forms on Earth.

There might be a race of furry caterpillar bipeds with exoskeletons but they'll be based on the same amino acids as here and would probably die from an axe wound as much as we would. The same evolutionary pressures will have resulted in the same types of trade-offs you see in your body.

Variety, but within bounds.

Just like software. There might well be an almost infinite number of combinations of bits you can store in a computer's memory, only a tiny subset of that will be useful.

I don't go "exploring" other people's computers in search of new and different kinds of software, it'll be the same as on my computer.

But that's like, my opinion, man.

Those caterpillar men aren't coming here and we're not going there.

That's for sure.
 
2013-09-21 12:31:39 AM
"scientists still hope to uncover signs of ancient life by looking for organic compounds at the base of Mount Sharp. "

So...what they're saying is...once we find oil on Mars we'll be set?

...Actually that's a brilliant strategy, no surer way to get funding than that.
 
2013-09-21 01:46:06 AM

tira: "scientists still hope to uncover signs of ancient life by looking for organic compounds at the base of Mount Sharp. "

So...what they're saying is...once we find oil on Mars we'll be set?

...Actually that's a brilliant strategy, no surer way to get funding than that.


They could find enriched uranium packed in crates and it still wouldn't make sense to go get it.
 
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