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(ProPublica)   Medical errors come in just behind heart disease and cancer, making them third most common in cause of death in the US. Still no cure for oops   (propublica.org) divider line 62
    More: Scary, medication mistakes, United States, heart disease, cause of death, patient safety, cancers, toxicologies, American Hospital Association  
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2414 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Sep 2013 at 12:51 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-19 12:33:39 PM  
cdn0.sbnation.com

Yes there is.
 
2013-09-19 12:40:48 PM  
northdallasgazette.com

Is interested in a cure for oops.
 
2013-09-19 12:42:49 PM  

Bareefer Obonghit: [cdn0.sbnation.com image 471x360]

Yes there is.


Because I'm wearing them, and I just did.
 
2013-09-19 12:47:41 PM  
Time to start posting horror stories from the British and/or Canadian health industries...come on, you know you want to.
 
2013-09-19 12:54:41 PM  

gopher321: Time to start posting horror stories from the British and/or Canadian health industries...come on, you know you want to.


I once had a doctor with bad garlic breath. He was Italian and yelled at smokers.
 
2013-09-19 12:54:57 PM  
ObamaCare is somehow to blame for this.
 
2013-09-19 12:54:59 PM  
But we need to take the peoples' guns away
 
2013-09-19 12:55:10 PM  
Nobody should be surprised by this. Nobody.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-09-19 12:55:22 PM  

Dimensio: [northdallasgazette.com image 250x300]

Is interested in a cure for oops.


Am I the only one who finds it hilarious the name of that image file (Governor-Perry-Headshot.jpg) is one thing I like to see done?
 
2013-09-19 12:55:40 PM  
Erasers, don't make a mistake without one.

/obscure?
 
2013-09-19 12:56:07 PM  

gopher321: Time to start posting horror stories from the British and/or Canadian health industries...come on, you know you want to.


Always enjoy picking out the absurdities and errors in those stories.

For the record, Canada has not, and will never, replace waiting rooms with pits of snakes. We will, however, continue to force the elderly out into ice-flows when they grow too old to contribute to society.
 
2013-09-19 12:56:57 PM  
This wouldn't happen if we just gave the poor insurance companies more money.
 
2013-09-19 12:57:06 PM  
Someone posted the stats recently, I forget, the worst thing you can do when less than critically injured is go to the hospital.  HBI is deadly shiat.
 
2013-09-19 12:59:02 PM  

hasty ambush: But we need to take the peoples' guns away


Just because a we're on average more obese than we are violent is no reason to celebrate. We still suck at both compared to other high income countries.
 
2013-09-19 01:04:03 PM  
When I took Health IT classes this was something that was always highly discussed and a reduction in this was part of the long-term outcome from EHR.
 
2013-09-19 01:05:22 PM  
There's no accidental death when you resort to shaman-based mysticism. Checkmate, science.
 
2013-09-19 01:05:56 PM  

hasty ambush: But we need to take the peoples' guns away


Well, yeah, you have to go to those hospitals if you get shot.
 
2013-09-19 01:06:20 PM  

CarnySaur: ObamaCare is somehow to blame for this.


Not yet but when it all becomes about money then it is going to get much worse.
 
2013-09-19 01:06:35 PM  
I thought the headline said, 'still no cure for cops'. Guess that works also.
 
2013-09-19 01:07:54 PM  
Nothing surprising.  Seen a lot of doctors who were burnt-out, incompetent, or just in it for the money.
 
2013-09-19 01:13:50 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtcbVUNO1NY 

I would never under any circumstances do anything to harm a patient unless I was doing it as a goof.

DID YOU PUT THE SCISSORS IN HER?!
AS A GOD DAMN GOOF!
 
2013-09-19 01:17:46 PM  
My dad's cancer was misdiagnosed as an infection. Until it reached Stage 4. The doctor's response? "I'm really sorry".

That's about as close to admitting you farked up as doctors get...
 
2013-09-19 01:21:52 PM  
Do doctors not have access to google?
 
2013-09-19 01:26:52 PM  
This is why you never say "oops!" in the OR.  Say "There!" as if you meant to do it, so your words won't be used against you in a malpractice suit.
 
2013-09-19 01:27:20 PM  
There is a book called The Checklist Manifesto that goes into details about this and is applicable accross many industries.  Essentially if you are a patient, there are probably a couple hundred interactions and decisions that occur regarding your care every day.  Your outcome is largely around the hospitals ability to execute all of these steps correctly without error.  A 1 percent error rate will net you a couple of errors in your care a day.  Oops.
 
2013-09-19 01:31:10 PM  
They need to add hospitals and doctors to Yelp.
 
2013-09-19 01:33:29 PM  

cards fan by association: They need to add hospitals and doctors to Yelp.


So Yelp can distort and blackmail more people?
 
2013-09-19 01:34:17 PM  
Wonder what the nature of the errors are.  There's a difference between forgetting to tell the ER doctor you're on certain medications leading to an interaction and death, and coming in with pain and being discharged with Tylenol and dying later from a burst appendix.

Word of advice: if you have any medical history, keep a record on your computer, print a copy and keep in your wallet.  Give a copy to your spouse, or an adult child.  Update occasionally.  Medical history should have major and minor hospitalizations (and dates for them!) with reason and outcome, chronic conditions like asthma, high blood pressure, a plate in your head, or diabetes, any medications you take including OTC, vitamins, and supplements - don't forget dosages! - and allergies or adverse drug interactions you've had.  This helps when you go to any doctor or go into the hospital, as they ask for this information.  It also helps for emergency care, as you may not be in a state to remember all of your history in a serious situation, and whoever brought you may not know everything.  I've gotten compliments from doctors and nurses of all kinds for having this on hand.  It also helps your care because you can point out what they may have missed - for instance, having a patient in the hospital and the care staff reads over Diabetes, and doesn't monitor sugar or give insulin for a few days.

/getting kudos from Yale doctors for my recordkeeping is pretty cool
 
2013-09-19 01:34:25 PM  

BafflerMeal: cards fan by association: They need to add hospitals and doctors to Yelp.

So Yelp can distort and blackmail more people?


To make shiatty service more transparent.
 
2013-09-19 01:37:14 PM  
bullshiat. farking people will believe anything they read. OMG people die in horsepitals? completely overlook how many are walking dead, older than Moses, have had years of piss poor health and they never took care of themselves to begin with, or was just put through incredible physical trauma in a horrifying wreck or what not. Perhaps we should start sending all these folks to the local Subway for a tasty sammy, that will change statistics.

people do make mistakes. in all walks of life. i'm sorry if you lost a loved one. there are no perfect people, not in healthcare, not in any career. this is why you can ask for a second opinion. this is why the Yellow Pages lists hundreds of doctors, health clinics and hospitals. this is why an ambulance can take you to more than one place. people making mistakes are sometimes the people who accept whatever they're told and do nothing more for their loved ones. worst yet is grieving adult children of very sickly parent(s) who somehow think their mom or dad should live forever. unrealistic expectations is a fools folly.
 
2013-09-19 01:37:27 PM  
So where does death by stupidity fall
 
2013-09-19 01:37:55 PM  
Still no cure for lupus.

www.printedclothing.com
 
2013-09-19 01:39:44 PM  
A friend went in for open heart.  Generally routine procedure with a  .5%  death rate, not bad considering the type of people going in...

They frkking  bust a blood vessel with a clamp duing the restart.   Killing the bottom of the heart.

Nice Fukup.   No apology for 'hey, take these meds for the rest of your life.'
 
2013-09-19 01:47:24 PM  

mediablitz: My dad's cancer was misdiagnosed as an infection. Until it reached Stage 4. The doctor's response? "I'm really sorry".

That's about as close to admitting you farked up as doctors get...


I hear ya.  They found...something in my mom's chest in February.  Pulmonologist thought it was an enlarged lymph node due to ILD, which was biopsied. Early July the docs at Yale said no, it was a tumor in the lung.

/at least your dad's doctor said sorry, my mom's said "Only God knows" re: ILD
//which is why we said "we're getting a second opinion"
///fark that shiathead doctor for his misdiagnoses (yes, plural)
 
2013-09-19 01:48:37 PM  

Nutsac_Jim: A friend went in for open heart.  Generally routine procedure with a  .5%  death rate, not bad considering the type of people going in...

They frkking  bust a blood vessel with a clamp duing the restart.   Killing the bottom of the heart.

Nice Fukup.   No apology for 'hey, take these meds for the rest of your life.'


If your friend was going in for an open heart procedure, they were going to need meds for the rest of their life anyway.
 
2013-09-19 01:54:48 PM  

cards fan by association: They need to add hospitals and doctors to Yelp.


Doctors already are, dunno about hospitals.
 
2013-09-19 01:55:14 PM  
Still no cure for oops aides.

FTFY
 
2013-09-19 02:01:24 PM  

Nutsac_Jim: A friend went in for open heart.  Generally routine procedure with a  .5%  death rate, not bad considering the type of people going in...

They frkking  bust a blood vessel with a clamp duing the restart.   Killing the bottom of the heart.

Nice Fukup.   No apology for 'hey, take these meds for the rest of your life.'


So, your point is that he's not dead, and has an essentially new heart after the surgery.  Whereas, before the surgery, he would certainly die from multiple arterial blockages to his heart?  And that he would 100% be on a grocery list of medications after surgery, regardless of the outcome, is apparently immaterial to you.

Clamping the arteries of the heart isn't like changing the oil of your car.  There are a metric-ton of possible complications, about which your friend was no doubt informed for his consent prior to the procedure.  I would be inclined to think your friend came out ahead in this particular instance, complication notwithstanding.

/reminds me of LouisCK - "Are you not amazed that you are flying above the ground in a tin can?  And you complain the internet is too slow?"
 
2013-09-19 02:10:50 PM  
Medical Errors. I.E..they didnt read your chart and gave you the wrong meds, or wrong dosage

or

Medical Errors I.E. "we are not sure what they problem is, so we are going to try this and see if it helps"
 
2013-09-19 02:21:13 PM  
Still no cure for oops

There  is a cure for a large percentage of the oops, but the healthcare corporations are uninterested in funding it and the politicians they own are unwilling to mandate it.
 
2013-09-19 02:25:29 PM  

lilbjorn: Still no cure for oops

There  is a cure for a large percentage of the oops, but the healthcare corporations are uninterested in funding it and the politicians they own are unwilling to mandate it.


What is the cure?
 
2013-09-19 02:25:43 PM  
I didn't see the data, but how much of these deaths are due to "oops" vs. flat-out incompetence?

If you include the latter, I'm thinking it might well be the #1 cause of death in this country.

/I'd love to strip DHS of most of its budget and throw it towards actually FIXING healthcare, rather than the crap we've got going on now.
 
2013-09-19 02:26:37 PM  
I don't know the stats on medical mistakes in Canada (where I live), but I recently went in for a colonoscopy and gastroscopy (covered under my provincial health plan, OHIP), which are very routine procedures requiring only sedation. I was asked several times my name and birthday and what I was there for, right up until I walked into the procedure room. This certainly made me feel much more comfortable that they weren't going to cut off one of my boobs or other body part by "mistake!" Is this kind of constant questioning of patients common in the U.S. when you go in for any procedure or operation?
 
2013-09-19 02:27:39 PM  

OhioUGrad: When I took Health IT classes this was something that was always highly discussed and a reduction in this was part of the long-term outcome from EHR.


Same here. Considering some of the paper charts we had to attempt to code, it's not surprising. The handwriting is atrocious, and it's all too easy for one acronym to look like something else. And that's just on the paper-pusher end, I can't imagine how difficult it must be for nurses to work with some of that written garbage sometimes. Not that their handwriting is any better...

Bottom line, more providers need to start taking advantage of the federal monies provided under HITECH to switch to EHR. Everyone is able to read a typed format, while chart scribbles...not so much. I think that will be the #1 help to reducing medical mistakes.
 
2013-09-19 02:36:56 PM  
And that doesn't even include all the ones they got to bury first.
 
2013-09-19 02:38:33 PM  

gopher321: Time to start posting horror stories from the British and/or Canadian health industries...come on, you know you want to.


Would love to.. but aside from a medium wait period for procedure being a bit longer... there aren't any!

//Suffers from procedur-able disease
///Takes many meds with interactions
////Lives in Canada
 
2013-09-19 02:45:33 PM  

Vector R: OhioUGrad: When I took Health IT classes this was something that was always highly discussed and a reduction in this was part of the long-term outcome from EHR.

Same here. Considering some of the paper charts we had to attempt to code, it's not surprising. The handwriting is atrocious, and it's all too easy for one acronym to look like something else. And that's just on the paper-pusher end, I can't imagine how difficult it must be for nurses to work with some of that written garbage sometimes. Not that their handwriting is any better...

Bottom line, more providers need to start taking advantage of the federal monies provided under HITECH to switch to EHR. Everyone is able to read a typed format, while chart scribbles...not so much. I think that will be the #1 help to reducing medical mistakes.


We should all hope so. Even things like misplaced/missing decimal points. I think a lot of doctors dislike it (besides the initial costs) because the system we were learning about helped the doctors along in some aspects (recommendations etc...) and everyone knows doctors hate to be told anything. I think next year will be a much bigger year for HITECH than it has been since it was initially passed.
 
2013-09-19 02:50:32 PM  

There's Always A Bloody Ghost: I don't know the stats on medical mistakes in Canada (where I live), but I recently went in for a colonoscopy and gastroscopy (covered under my provincial health plan, OHIP), which are very routine procedures requiring only sedation. I was asked several times my name and birthday and what I was there for, right up until I walked into the procedure room. This certainly made me feel much more comfortable that they weren't going to cut off one of my boobs or other body part by "mistake!" Is this kind of constant questioning of patients common in the U.S. when you go in for any procedure or operation?


From what I've seen, yes.  Each doctor or nurse will ask you your name and DOB or check your wrist band. For a procedure they will go over your chart again and again with each person who sees you (nurse, doc, anesthesia, etc.).  At some hospitals they will scan your band's bar code (or whatever the block is called) before administering tests, vitals or meds.  They also tag you with color-coded bands - again, iirc: pink for "do not use this arm" (mastectomy), red for allergy, teal for no blood products, and I believe yellow for DNR.
 
2013-09-19 02:57:23 PM  
A buddy of mine is a mortician and he always says his slowest time at the funeral home is during the
summer when all the doctors are on vacation.
 
2013-09-19 03:42:11 PM  
Just because a hospital paid out to a death case doesn't mean they in any way made a mistake. It's simply much cheaper to pay out insurance claims than spend billions proving innocence.
 
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