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(The New Republic)   New dorms have granite countertops, fire pits, and simulated golf courses. And you wonder why we're always complaining about the costs of college tuition   (newrepublic.com) divider line 67
    More: Ironic, Association of Colleges, Central Park West, fire pits, Drexel University, college tuition, dorms  
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4541 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Sep 2013 at 12:44 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



67 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-19 12:45:57 PM  
Yes. Real golf courses would be much better.
 
2013-09-19 12:47:51 PM  
This is like that one surfer dude who bought lobster with his SNAP allotment, right? They went out and found one private college with these amenities.
 
2013-09-19 12:48:04 PM  
I do find it funny, working on a college campus. Students really do simultaneously complain about the increase in tuition costs, and then whine about wanting nicer facilities and services. Well kids, someone has to pay for that shiat and that some one is YOU (or your parents).
 
2013-09-19 12:48:16 PM  
It's OK subby. They only complain AFTER they graduate. Right now they don't care.
 
2013-09-19 12:50:53 PM  
I dont really see the problem with having people live in apartments vs traditional dorms.

Dont you usually end up paying an extra fee for that sort of amenity anyhow?

There is no way the dorm costs are whats driving tuition.
 
2013-09-19 12:50:55 PM  
Tuition fees =/= room and board

/but, then again, things may have changed since the 90s...
 
2013-09-19 12:51:10 PM  
Student housing is generally entirely self-financed, and billed completely separately from tuition/education fees. If it is too expensive students have the option to live off campus.
 
2013-09-19 12:52:41 PM  
My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.
 
2013-09-19 12:52:43 PM  
My dorm room was one security door away from qualifying as a prison cell....
 
2013-09-19 12:53:01 PM  
In defence of the college - vomit is very easy to clean off a granite counter-top and crab-infested bed sheets require safe burning in a fire pit.
 
2013-09-19 12:53:25 PM  
Times *SURE* have changed.
 
2013-09-19 12:53:35 PM  

sycraft: I do find it funny, working on a college campus. Students really do simultaneously complain about the increase in tuition costs, and then whine about wanting nicer facilities and services. Well kids, someone has to pay for that shiat and that some one is YOU (or your parents).


I recently graduated 2 years ago. It was the same there too. I chose to go to a state college, and sniffed out the cheapest rent/on campus living. I didn't care about a pool table or anything. I saved over 6K in loans just by that. With the excess loan money, I cut a check right back to government for the difference. There were students that I know who went out and bought 42" TV's. They just graduated. I can't wait to hear them complain about their ballooned bills.

feelsgoodman.jpg
 
2013-09-19 12:54:20 PM  

ChipNASA: Times *SURE* have changed.


cache10.indulgy.net

/fark you preview
 
2013-09-19 12:54:42 PM  

Enigmamf: Student housing is generally entirely self-financed, and billed completely separately from tuition/education fees. If it is too expensive students have the option to live off campus.


No, not always.  Many schools require both on campus living and a meal plan for freshmen students

/daughter is applying to colleges as I type this, finding all kinds of ways they want to get money from us
 
2013-09-19 12:55:14 PM  
Flat-Screen TVs

This old dog whistle.
 
2013-09-19 12:55:17 PM  
My oldest kid has a crappy dorm room but a cook to order meal plan. The younger one's dorm room can put the article's suite to shame.
 
2013-09-19 12:55:39 PM  
One of the dirty little secrets of American higher ed.   Campuses are built and rebuilt, with the money going to politically connected contractors. Most of the money spent does nothing to improve the quality of instruction.  The result is ever increasing tuition and mountains of student debt that can not be extinguished through bankruptcy even decades later.  Most of this stuff has very little to do with improving education.  Fact is that most kids really don't need the "college experience" of living on campus at all.

/Thanks Obama
 
2013-09-19 12:55:43 PM  
I lived off campus my junior and senior years in the fraternity house (1890s brick Victorian with 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, lots of space, and access to the party area). Yeah, communal living is a little weird, but most of it can be solved with telling people to clean up after themselves. Rent was $265 a month and that included full utilities, internet, garbage, and w/d access.

I graduated in 2010, but on-campus rates were 400/month for housing. I also was part of a 5 man group that moved in together and we had a LOT of fun because we planned it out.
 
2013-09-19 12:57:03 PM  

gopher321: Yes. Real golf courses would be much better.


No golf courses is still an option, right?
 
2013-09-19 12:57:06 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: This is like that one surfer dude who bought lobster with his SNAP allotment, right? They went out and found one private college with these amenities.


Most of it is pretty common actually.  The privacy issues are the big change.  Most dorms now are more like "suites" or "quads" and are called such.  Something like 4 private bedrooms sharing a common living area, kitchen, and bath.  Basically a 4 bedroom apartment.  Also looks about like the new Navy "barracks" in San Diego.  High rise condos for junior enlisted.

/works at college with 4 new dorms open this fall.
 
2013-09-19 01:00:43 PM  
That's a lot of expense for something that's going to be trashed by the end of the semester.
 
2013-09-19 01:02:16 PM  
Approves
i265.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-19 01:02:22 PM  

Enigmamf: Student housing is generally entirely self-financed, and billed completely separately from tuition/education fees. If it is too expensive students have the option to live off campus.


Living in the dorms used to be the cheaper option, by a large margin when I was in school.  Everybody wanted out of the dorms - ours were cinderblock rooms with tile floors about the size of my current office but with 2 or 3 people in them, 1 communal roach infested bathroom for each floor and daily brown-outs.  But an off campus apartment was out of reach for alot of folks, especially when you add in the parking & food cost (relative to the meal plan that came with dorm living).  There was always ramen of course.

This isn't exactly rare - with the easy money that's been available, universities are competing on amenities not cost.
 
2013-09-19 01:04:26 PM  

xanadian: Tuition fees =/= room and board

/but, then again, things may have changed since the 90s...


came here to say this. the rising cost of tuition has nothing to do with the state of dorms.


AsparagusFTW: sycraft: I do find it funny, working on a college campus. Students really do simultaneously complain about the increase in tuition costs, and then whine about wanting nicer facilities and services. Well kids, someone has to pay for that shiat and that some one is YOU (or your parents).

I recently graduated 2 years ago. It was the same there too. I chose to go to a state college, and sniffed out the cheapest rent/on campus living. I didn't care about a pool table or anything. I saved over 6K in loans just by that. With the excess loan money, I cut a check right back to government for the difference. There were students that I know who went out and bought 42" TV's. They just graduated. I can't wait to hear them complain about their ballooned bills.

feelsgoodman.jpg


you're smart. Both my sister and brother-in-law made terrible financial decisions when they went to college, and are now struggling with how much debt they have to pay off. I went to the army, got out in 2002 and used the GI bill to pay for my first 2 years at the local community college, transferred to a 4 year school to finish my last two years. Only cost me a very modest student loan, which should be fully paid off by the end of this year.

You can save so much money if you commute. Granted, you don't get that "college experience", but then again, you're also not getting that "crippling debt" as a result of your "college experience".
 
2013-09-19 01:06:43 PM  

Fissile: One of the dirty little secrets of American higher ed.   Campuses are built and rebuilt, with the money going to politically connected contractors. Most of the money spent does nothing to improve the quality of instruction.  The result is ever increasing tuition and mountains of student debt that can not be extinguished through bankruptcy even decades later.  Most of this stuff has very little to do with improving education.  Fact is that most kids really don't need the "college experience" of living on campus at all.

/Thanks Obama


I didn't live on campus my freshman year, I lived with my brother the entire duration of my college experience.  I really regret it.  I wish I'd moved into a dorm (prison style back then).  I'd have more freinds and probably have done better academically without a commute to worry about.

Also, they built one of these things in the most convenient parking lot downtown.  It was hidden between a little strip of retail stores, a theater, and the visual arts building.  Center of downtown, free parking, well lit, and always an open space.  Best. Parking. Ever.  Damn luxury student housing.
 
2013-09-19 01:07:15 PM  

xanadian: Tuition fees =/= room and board

/but, then again, things may have changed since the 90s...


This, subby is and idiot. Probably went to one of those "great deal" schools.
 
2013-09-19 01:09:58 PM  
As an employee of a company getting into the Luxury Student Housing construction market, I approve and may get a raise.
 
2013-09-19 01:10:53 PM  
Boeheimian Rhapsody:
you're smart. Both my sister and brother-in-law made terrible financial decisions when they went to college, and are now struggling with how much debt they have to pay off. I went to the army, got out in 2002 and used the GI bill to pay for my first 2 years at the local community college, transferred to a 4 year school to finish my last two years. Only cost me a very modest student loan, which should be fully paid off by the end of this year.

You can save so much money if you commute. Granted, you don't get that "college experience", but then again, you're also not getting that "crippling debt" as a result of your "college experience".


I went to college for accounting. Lol. I knew how interest worked a little more than your average college student. I still have a lot out in debt. But I am paying far more than the minimum every month because of the interest. You did the right way too. I knew early on that if I took the extra check from the gov. to go buy shiat, I would pay almost double over the course of the loan. That $500 42" my asshat friends bought with their refund check will cost them 1K when the loan is re-paid.
 
2013-09-19 01:12:05 PM  

xanadian: Tuition fees =/= room and board

/but, then again, things may have changed since the 90s...


Still comes out of the same pot of money - dad's wallet and/or future debt.
 
2013-09-19 01:15:07 PM  

flynn80: As an employee of a company getting into the Luxury Student Housing construction market, I approve and may get a raise.


I interviewed with with the construction division of one of those investment companies and I honestly felt like someone would stab me in the back 50 times in the first week if I worked there. They don't fark around.
 
2013-09-19 01:19:54 PM  
These singletons are even less keen on trekking down the hallway to the common bathroom (especially now that so many are gender-neutral).

Why it may sound exciting to share bathrooms with sexy coeds, the truth is more sinister.
The last thing I want to see is uber hot Jaclyn from Econ 101 walking into the bathroom at 8.30 am with messy hair, bad breath and sitting on the commode next stall over from me hearing her farting and squeezing our a few large dueces..

...sorry I'm not German.
 
2013-09-19 01:21:17 PM  
Granite is a good material for dorms and rentals. It's practically indestructible and burn-proof.
 
2013-09-19 01:24:01 PM  
They could update the dorms... or... maybe... they could MAKE IT CHEAPER SO MORE PEOPLE COULD AFFORD IT.

Greedy farks.
 
2013-09-19 01:31:53 PM  

Tom_Slick: My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.


You had AC?
 
2013-09-19 01:31:57 PM  
My dorm tomb was beneath a football stadium and it was more like a Turkish prison cell than a dorm room. $90/ semester so no lasting complaints

*wanders off to yell at clouds*
 
2013-09-19 01:32:31 PM  
In my town's college the expensive fancy dorms have lots of vacancies. The older dorms-- y'know, cinderblocks, dodgy bathrooms, tiny shared bedrooms-- are always full because they're priced reasonable.

I think a lot of this is colleges trying to bring in more rich students than they currently have.
 
2013-09-19 01:35:50 PM  
Gotta prepare them for life in the corporate arcology somehow.

storiesbywilliams.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-09-19 01:36:03 PM  

BEER_ME_in_CT: They could update the dorms... or... maybe... they could MAKE IT CHEAPER SO MORE PEOPLE COULD AFFORD IT.

Greedy farks.


University enrollment is at an all time high. Why would they make it cheaper?
 
2013-09-19 01:40:13 PM  
Dorm junior and senior year was previously the local hospital.  Barely converted to a upperclass quiet study dorm.  Rooms still had a lot of the hospital plumbing hookups, oxygen connections, etc.  Still had the gold leaf numbers and lettering on the doors.  Bathroom sink was knee actuated (i..e scrub sink).  Lived proudly senior in the old Delivery Room (still said it on the door).  Lounge down the hall was the old style nursery with the glass window to peer at the babies through.

Actually met someone in town who had been born in my dorm room.
 
2013-09-19 01:40:43 PM  

robbiex0r: BEER_ME_in_CT: They could update the dorms... or... maybe... they could MAKE IT CHEAPER SO MORE PEOPLE COULD AFFORD IT.

Greedy farks.

University enrollment is at an all time high. Why would they make it cheaper?


Pretty sure it hit its peak and is trending back down due to the discontinuation govt subsidy.

Thought I saw it on fark. Could be wrong
 
2013-09-19 01:42:08 PM  
My dorm tomb was beneath a football stadium and it was more like a Turkish prison cell than a dorm room. $90/ semester so no lasting complaints

I lived there too. North end.
 
2013-09-19 01:42:19 PM  

sycraft: I do find it funny, working on a college campus. Students really do simultaneously complain about the increase in tuition costs, and then whine about wanting nicer facilities and services. Well kids, someone has to pay for that shiat and that some one is YOU (or your parents).


In college I only cared about:

Girls (access to hot girls)

Internet connection (and back then, I was one of he few that cared)

Healthy food
 
2013-09-19 01:46:45 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: This is like that one surfer dude who bought lobster with his SNAP allotment, right? They went out and found one private college with these amenities.


I can tell you that my alma mater, a state school, has dorms that are palatial compared to when I went there: it was 2 guys in a 12x12 concrete block hole. Hell, my brother's dorm 2 years later didn't even have A/C in Florida. The buildings are glorious and glamorous. The gym is beyond state-of-the art. The kids drive extremely expensive cars. Don't even get me started on the football stadium.

When they call and ask for money, I tell them to go to hell.
 
2013-09-19 01:47:21 PM  
My dorm was a temporary building that was supposed to be replace in 1964. I lived there in the mid 90s.
 
2013-09-19 01:48:25 PM  

robbiex0r: Tom_Slick: My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.

You had AC?


Yeah, south Georgia and the window only opened 3 inches.
 
2013-09-19 01:55:52 PM  

brandent: Most of it is pretty common actually.  The privacy issues are the big change.  Most dorms now are more like "suites" or "quads" and are called such.  Something like 4 private bedrooms sharing a common living area, kitchen, and bath.  Basically a 4 bedroom apartment.


I lived in a place like that. It was built in the 60s or 70s, and it sent some very mixed messages about privacy. Sure, we all had separate bedrooms, but take a walk down the short hallway from the living room, turn 90 degrees, and BAM! shower. No door. Just the shower. Right in the hallway. At least they put the toilet in a weird little closet...
 
2013-09-19 01:56:23 PM  
That might explain some of why tuition costs are 400% higher than they were in the 1980s.
 
2013-09-19 01:57:38 PM  

Boeheimian Rhapsody: I went to the army, got out in 2002 and used the GI bill to pay for my first 2 years at the local community college, transferred to a 4 year school to finish my last two years. Only cost me a very modest student loan, which should be fully paid off by the end of this year.

You can save so much money if you commute. Granted, you don't get that "college experience", but then again, you're also not getting that "crippling debt" as a result of your "college experience".


I did something similar. Joined the army, got out in 05. Community College in California is incredibly cheap (under $30/unit when I went), so I paid for it with a combination of small grants and out of pocket. I saved my GI bill until I got to the more expensive university. Didn't use it the first year, because I was able to get grants and scholarships to cover 100% of that year, but I used it my final year (and combined with some continuing scholarships, I actually got money back). GI Bill also entirely paid for my master's degree.

I met another vet at the community college who used his GI Bill then. I thought it was the dumbest thing; why the hell would you waste such a wonderful resource on $30/unit courses when you're planning on going to a university where it costs hundreds of dollars per unit?

/I know community colleges in other states can get expensive, so using the GI Bill there can be a smart move.
 
2013-09-19 01:58:11 PM  

robbiex0r: Tom_Slick: My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.

You had AC?


We had heat in the winter - if you were on the end of the building where the steam pipes came in.  But you had to keep your windows open all winter.  If you were on the other end of the building you froze.  That end became known as the freshman wing because they didn't know about that feature in the fall when the weather was beautiful.  So an upperclassman came by and asked if you wanted to swap rooms - the upperclassman's nice room with a view of the quad for the froshes dark hole with a view of the cafeteria and far from the head - because it was "quieter".
 
2013-09-19 02:04:54 PM  
theinfosphere.org

This is my old college dorm.
 
2013-09-19 02:11:59 PM  
People should have nice things and nice lives.  You Americans want everybody living on beans in prisons.  :(
 
2013-09-19 02:15:42 PM  

Tom_Slick: My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.


CSB: One of the dorms at my university was based on a prison facility, IIRC the hall/stairway setup was specifically designed for riot containment.
 
2013-09-19 02:17:10 PM  

mod3072: [theinfosphere.org image 640x480]

This is my old college dorm.


The house I lived in off-campus was condemned two years after I left and the fire dept burned it down for practice. A year after that, my old frosh dorm was torn down because of asbestos. I just assumed that student housing was crap housing.

Meanwhile, anyone interested in why college costs so much can read this for starters. It's the best and least political of anything I've read on the subject.

/worked in higher ed admin for 20+ years
 
2013-09-19 02:19:45 PM  

Loadmaster: That might explain some of why tuition costs are 400% higher than they were in the 1980s.


Adjusting for inflation, average adjunct professor pay has remained the same since the 1970s, while administration costs have skyrocketed. (I can't find the link I was looking for, but here's something similar: The Troubling Dean-to-Professor Ratio)

At my alma mater, the same year that professors and staff were getting furloughed, department budgets were getting cut, departments were getting merged - that same year our university president's annual salary went from 150k to 400k.  She got a $250,000 raise while everyone associated with teaching was getting a pay cut.  And tuition went up.

/Actually, here's that I was thinking of: How the American University was Killed, but I'll keep the other one there, because it's a good read
//Here's another good read: What's Driving College Costs Higher?
 
2013-09-19 02:22:43 PM  
The state university I attend charges just shy of 2 grand a semester for a double occupancy dorm room with a shared bath between 2 rooms in an old school cinderblock style building. You can't stay there during the summer or over winter break, and have nowhere to cook other than a microwave, so you're pretty much committed to having a meal plan at about $1400 per semester.

Take that same $16k/year between the 4 students and you can get a nice damn house off campus for $1300 a month, that has no RA to biatch at you and you're welcome to stay there during the summer and during breaks--which is nice if you have a job in town.

In short, housing costs are insane for resident students, and luxury buildings don't seem to be why that is, at least her, especially when you compare it to what the same amount of money spread over even a couple of students would get on the private market.
 
2013-09-19 02:27:50 PM  

mod3072: This is my old college dorm.


Roobot house!
 
2013-09-19 03:08:07 PM  

solitary: People should have nice things and nice lives.  You Americans want everybody living on beans in prisons.  :(


Sure, if they can afford it.  They should also have the option to get a good education without all the irrelevant & expensive frills if that's what they need.  Particularly at public universities on government grant money.

 We can and should do better then the 100 year old cinderblock place that I've been describing - though despite my griping here it really wasn't a huge issue one way or another and I have good memories from the dorm days.  But the luxury apartments are to far in the other extreme as on campus dorm housing.
 
2013-09-19 03:38:25 PM  
So what? it's a private college. If you're stupid enough to go to a private non-ivy school for undergrad without a huge scholarship you deserve to lose that money.
 
2013-09-19 04:00:05 PM  
As it was described to me, the universities are pursuing an arms race for the "best" students. Of course Rich are always "better" than poor, and the rich are accustomed to a certain type of lifestyle.

So the college I attended, had a full 18 hole golf course, eventually built a 20 million dollar aquatics facility. The college already had a national level hockey arena, a football stadium and reasonable amenities for a number of other sports, and finally it's own ski facility 15 miles from the main campus. However the freshman dorm was still left over from those cinderblock days, expanded from being an 19th century mansion, with marble exteriors but interiors much more spartan.

Of course all of the newer dorms that were being built had high speed internet connections, cooking facilities, easy access to newly built cafeterias, and everything else to ease the load of being a student. This was back in the 90's of course, so I can only imagine what they have added now to make sure that the college experience would be as isolated and incongruous to the rest of the world as possible for all the students who could pay the now 60K per year price tag. However, I will say, that if you made it into the school, through the academic side, they would work with you to find a way to get you out with a degree with no student loan debt whether you were rich or poor.
 
2013-09-19 05:04:53 PM  

tricycleracer: Flat-Screen TVs

This old dog whistle.


Those who always want to bleat about "the poors" or anyone else they don't like drag this old tired meme out with absolutely
no thought to two facts: the price of a flat panel television has dropped from $3,999 for a 42 inch low-end model LCD in 2003
to less than $390 (cheaper refurbished) in 2013, and that it's nearly impossible to find a CRT television these days for sale.
Almost all new tvs are flat panel.

Or, they're just idiots.
/Probably the second one.
//yeah the second one
 
2013-09-19 06:07:48 PM  

Alonjar: I dont really see the problem with having people live in apartments vs traditional dorms.

Dont you usually end up paying an extra fee for that sort of amenity anyhow?


Not when I was in college. One side of campus had the dumpy highrise dorms, with cinderblock walls and metal bunkbeds - mostly freshman lived there. The other side of campus was the apartment-style units in nice Federalist-style brick buildings with decent (but low end) wood furniture. The units had also kitchens so we could opt out of the dining plan. Mostly juniors and seniors lived there.

The cost for both was the same. Granted, back then, we didn't have in-room internet (dial-up only) and no cable TV connections. Damn, I'm old.
 
2013-09-19 06:13:10 PM  

Tom_Slick: My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.


same here... and nowhere near worth what they charged... and the food was atrocious.

I'm all for updating a dorm so it doesn't feel like said minimum security prison, but there is absolutely no reason for a dorm to get all tricked out to look like a luxury apartment. It's money that would be better spent on oh I dunno... financial aid.. scholarships... or updating classrooms/equipment and perhaps improving the actual quality of education.
 
2013-09-19 06:18:52 PM  

Jacobin: My dorm tomb was beneath a football stadium and it was more like a Turkish prison cell than a dorm room. $90/ semester so no lasting complaints

*wanders off to yell at clouds*


Rudy?
 
2013-09-19 07:20:09 PM  

shazbotuh: Tom_Slick: My dorm wouldn't have passed code for a minimum security prison.  But it was safe and AC worked.

same here... and nowhere near worth what they charged... and the food was atrocious.

I'm all for updating a dorm so it doesn't feel like said minimum security prison, [...]


Seriously, Brown actually has a group of dorms that WERE designed by a prison architect. All concrete, tiny rooms, windows that don't open, short sightlines wherever possible - just like a prison. It was absolutely miserable to live there.... and at the time, it was the only smoke-free dorm. So I was basically sent to prison for having asthma (and then they overheated the place all winter, and with the no-open windows - yeah, that's IDEAL for asthmatics </sarcasm>). I dearly want to find that architect and make him live in his own horrid dorm for a year.
 
2013-09-19 07:58:19 PM  
My oldest just started college in NYC and, being that her school is tiny (under 1,000 students), they don't have their own dorms.  We got stuck going through a private dorm provider.  Thankfully her grandparents offered to pay for it because for the fall and spring semesters, it came to just under $15k, and this is for a room where she has one roommate.  The room is about the size of her bedroom at home and a nice sized bath.  And there isn't even a kitchen in the room - just a refrigerator and a microwave, and there's a communal kitchen on every 4th floor.  

The dorm provider, though, tried to make it sound awesome... free wifi, free cable, A/C in every room, a full gym, location (the building's on the Upper East Side and is about a 15 min. walk from campus),  laundry facilities with machines that text you when they're done, etc... but it's still a TON of money.

Next year's going to suck because my other daughter is looking at going to college in Brooklyn.  Might be cheaper to rent them an apartment to share.

/that BFA degree she's pursuing BETTER pay off *grrr*
 
2013-09-19 10:39:42 PM  

shazbotuh: It's money that would be better spent on oh I dunno... financial aid.. scholarships... or updating classrooms/equipment and perhaps improving the actual quality of education.


This is true for a public institution. For a private institution... fark it. Let the kids have live in f*ck maids if that's what gets the parents to pay.
 
2013-09-20 12:06:15 AM  
I couldn't be bothered to read this article, but I saw something similar a week or so ago.  It was a private corporation providing housing marketed towards students - rich students.  The places all looked very nice but although they said they worked with the university it was off campus housing and was completely unaffiliated with the school.

I lived in university housing my freshman year, but it was an off-campus apartment.  3 people, one bedroom about the size of my current master bathroom, shiatty linoleum tile floor with barely enough room to swing a cat..

When the phone books were delivered one of us had the bright idea to carpet the floor with them.  We just used them as tiles and taped up the seams.  It was better than the shiatty flooring beneath it.  Nobody really wanted to use phone books even back in the '80s.

I remember one spoiled girl who started the same year as I did took one look at them with her parents and they went straight out and rented a place completely unaffiliated with the school.

This is really nothing new folks, except now there are corporations getting in on the game.
 
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