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(WTKR)   Why does congress hate shipyard workers?   (wtkr.com) divider line 13
    More: Asinine, Jonathan Greenert, navies, USS George Washington, House Armed Services Committee, workers, Australian Defence Medal  
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1081 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Sep 2013 at 9:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



13 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-19 08:50:02 AM  
Congress should apply a little more hate to all defense contractors.  But nobody wants to be the guy that shut down an industry in their own state.
 
2013-09-19 09:21:04 AM  
(insert House of Cards references here)
 
2013-09-19 09:23:20 AM  
Do you know any bubbas, subby?  You'd hate them, too.

One of them torched the USS MIAMI last year, for instance.
 
2013-09-19 09:43:02 AM  
Yesterday one of these GOP congressclowns was talking about how he feared the shipyard had implemented cost-saving policies in the prior months.  Yeah, asshole, that's what happens when you indiscriminately cut funding for stuff; people need to figure out how to save money.  Also, isn't that the free market in action?  Why do you hate the free market?  Are you proposing to make some regulations (gaaaasp), last time I heard anything from your yap you were screeching about how regulations, in all forms, are job killers?
 
2013-09-19 10:09:29 AM  
You don't understand. They coulda had class. They  coulda been contenders. They coulda been somebody, instead of bums, which is what they are, let's face it.
 
2013-09-19 11:20:03 AM  

Don't Troll Me Bro!: Also, isn't that the free market in action


Because nothing says "free market" like taxpayer-funded contracts handed out by politicians.
 
2013-09-19 12:37:48 PM  
Damn, that sucks. My dad worked in San Diego's shipyards his whole life. In fact, his shipyard was featured in The Lost World when the T-Rex arrives in San Diego Bay on that huge ship.
 
2013-09-19 12:40:18 PM  
Was I the only one who read "littoral combat ship" with a preceding "C"?
 
2013-09-19 12:48:52 PM  
Congress likes companies, not workers.
 
2013-09-19 01:29:28 PM  

pgh9fan: Was I the only one who read "littoral combat ship" with a preceding "C"?


well it will be full of seamen one day.
 
2013-09-19 01:36:54 PM  

Petey4335: (insert House of Cards references here)


We are going to replace the jobs with green jobs from a watershed project.
 
2013-09-19 10:52:31 PM  
Full disclosure: I'm one of those teat sucking contractors for the Navy.

The issue is not that they have to shelve these projects for a year. The problem is we are already working at the bare minimum to sustain construction moving forward as it is. If you shutter the yard for a few months, workers have mortgages and kids in college. They are going to get new work, and the goods ones are probably never coming back. At the same time, the only way you develop good tradesmen is by providing steady work over years. Our shipfitters are getting old, and there hasn't been enough work to sustain a population of younger workers to replace them.

Also the Navy has plans, down to the month, to replace aging ships. As you can imagine, if it takes 2 years to build a ship and another year to test it, you can't decide tomorrow that you need a new one. Or, you get the problem like the Navy has now with the Ticonderoga Class cruiser. They were all built around the same time, they are all getting past the end of their design life, and we have nothing in the pipeline that is going to replace their capability. (The DDG-53 flight III will take up some of the slack with the improved Radar, but we have nothing that can act as a true cruiser.)
 
2013-09-20 08:53:43 AM  

Evil Twin Skippy: Full disclosure: I'm one of those teat sucking contractors for the Navy.

The issue is not that they have to shelve these projects for a year. The problem is we are already working at the bare minimum to sustain construction moving forward as it is. If you shutter the yard for a few months, workers have mortgages and kids in college. They are going to get new work, and the goods ones are probably never coming back. At the same time, the only way you develop good tradesmen is by providing steady work over years. Our shipfitters are getting old, and there hasn't been enough work to sustain a population of younger workers to replace them.

Also the Navy has plans, down to the month, to replace aging ships. As you can imagine, if it takes 2 years to build a ship and another year to test it, you can't decide tomorrow that you need a new one. Or, you get the problem like the Navy has now with the Ticonderoga Class cruiser. They were all built around the same time, they are all getting past the end of their design life, and we have nothing in the pipeline that is going to replace their capability. (The DDG-53 flight III will take up some of the slack with the improved Radar, but we have nothing that can act as a true cruiser.)


Serious question, do we need to replace them?  Shouldn't we be scaling back our capacity to build ships, because we simply don't need as many now?
 
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