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(Business Insider)   Thirteen rules for using commas, without looking like an idiot   (businessinsider.com) divider line 113
    More: Spiffy  
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10413 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Sep 2013 at 4:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-18 10:36:44 PM  

uber humper: ArcadianRefugee: uber humper: uber humper: love_alice: commas are so old school --  I'm an m-dash girl.

What the hell?

Be civilized and use Alt+0150 - or Alt+0151 for a long dash -

/the 0150 or 0151 need to be typed on the 10-key to the side of your keyboard not the numbers above.

Fark.  It didn't go though on here

Yeah. Unless it's my settings, 0151 renders as 0150 (to my annoyance).

Not mine, 0151 was longer than - or the 0150.  Just that neither one rendered here.


Weird. They both render on mine, but 0151 is just en length. At least in Fark.

Well, they render fine in the comments box, but once submitted the post shows 'em both the same.

Acgk. Actually (just looking) they both show up as - (minus/hyphen).

Stupid Fark. Give us our dashes!
 
2013-09-18 10:40:43 PM  
,,.  ,"",.  ,,,,.  ,:,.

/ fill in the blanks, however you please.
 
2013-09-18 10:45:57 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: mediablitz: tuna fingers: I just recently dropped the use of a comma in a specific use in emails. "Thank you, Liz." has become, "Thank you Liz.". I dropped it because I was the only person using one in this situation. Ever.

I still use that comma. I refuse to give up.

This. I still use the double-space at the start of a new sentence, too. :)


That.  My elementary education remains with me to this day
 
2013-09-18 11:50:19 PM  

el3ctr1csheepz: Bah, the problem with that article is that there are never any really concrete rules for comma use. You can use as many or few as you like, and you can put them almost anywhere. Some of the most famous authors of our time abuse the poor comma like it's a repressed housewife in the 1950's. Authors have published entire novels without using a single one and some overuse them (Dickens, anyone?) like they're going out of style.


The rules have changed, as they always do.  Dickens' usage may have been the norm for the time and place he wrote.

Also, the fact that some extraordinarily talented people can get away with breaking the rules doesn't mean that there aren't rules, or shouldn't be.

I like to use Picasso as an example.  He first learned all the "proper rules" of representational painting and did some very, very realistic paintings during his earliest period.  Seriously, look at stuff he painted before 1901 and you will be amazed.  Later, AFTER he had mastered realism, then he explored different styles and helped create cubism.

Demonstrate to me first that you know the rules and can follow them; then I'll take seriously a claim that you shouldn't need to follow them.
 
2013-09-19 12:06:58 AM  

K3rmy: Why let your period stop you?  Continue with your day. . .with Comma.  Comma feminine projects allow to to carry on with your day, never stopping for rhyme or reason.  When your monthly sentence seems to be bringing you to an end, remember Comma.  You can run on and on and on and on. . .

/simple though
//comma is a pause when speaking
///period is when you take a breath
\\\opposite slashies are confused by semi-colons
////actually not - take a breath


starsmedia.ign.com
Approves.
 
2013-09-19 12:48:51 AM  

ciberido: el3ctr1csheepz: Bah, the problem with that article is that there are never any really concrete rules for comma use. You can use as many or few as you like, and you can put them almost anywhere. Some of the most famous authors of our time abuse the poor comma like it's a repressed housewife in the 1950's. Authors have published entire novels without using a single one and some overuse them (Dickens, anyone?) like they're going out of style.

The rules have changed, as they always do.  Dickens' usage may have been the norm for the time and place he wrote.

Also, the fact that some extraordinarily talented people can get away with breaking the rules doesn't mean that there aren't rules, or shouldn't be.

I like to use Picasso as an example.  He first learned all the "proper rules" of representational painting and did some very, very realistic paintings during his earliest period.  Seriously, look at stuff he painted before 1901 and you will be amazed.  Later, AFTER he had mastered realism, then he explored different styles and helped create cubism.

Demonstrate to me first that you know the rules and can follow them; then I'll take seriously a claim that you shouldn't need to follow them.


The issue with that statement is that it's still a matter of opinion. When I was working on my bachelors in English Literature I had different English teachers call for different uses of commas. The Oxford comma is only one example of this. Of course comma usage has changed since DIckens, it would be silly to think it hadn't. In the same way, comma usage has changed since I went to school to learn (among other things) how to use them. What I am attempting to convey is that, because of the constantly shifting nature of the lexicon, usage of things like commas will never be set in stone.

I would also argue that English, much like art, when used in an expressionist fashion has no rules, for commas or otherwise.

On the other hand, in the event that you are, for example, engaged in discussion on a forum thread about commas, it would be prudent to follow their established rules.

For journalistic, reference or even regular communication with fellow human beings, following exact standards of comma usage is always prudent. When writing ficticious prose or representative poetry, it is not.

It amuses me that a lot of this comment thread became discussion about the potential ambiguity of the Oxford comma. It seems to me that, by its very nature, the comma is a tad ambiguous no matter how it is used.
 
2013-09-19 01:38:13 AM  

Bareefer Obonghit: I'll bet Stephen Hawking can't stand, being crippled


Not sure if this was stolen from somebody else, or you're just a freakin genius. I love it. I laughed, heartily even.
 
2013-09-19 02:46:19 AM  

Tired_of_the_BS: 2. Some advanced education classes were impressed upon the workforce as a 'perk' - one of which was a master's level English writing course. The PhD teaching the class insisted that the Oxford comma was extraneous; along with my use of the letter u in gauntlet among other of my 'quaint, antiquated' spellings. When I gave examples of how ambiguity could be created both with and without the extra comma, she got visibly angry and insisted that no such ambiguity existed. I couldn't believe it.

So for our next assignment, I wrote an entire paper with every paragraph containing at least one ambiguous sentence - it was a several page assignment and I must have written 20 of the damned things; by the end you had no real idea who did what to whom.

And that B***h... Left eye twitching, frozen half smile on her face, made a few suggestions as to a descriptive word choice, and/or use of a semi-colon, wrote 'Clear! Concise!' across the top, and gave me an A. She pulled me aside after class, and told me that, being an older gentleman, that a certain inflexibility was to be understood; that she'd contact my employer the next morning to inform him that the class was a waste of my time, and had 'passed' me - I no longer needed to attend her class.

/it's gauntlet, damn it.


What's funny is that the Middle English is gantelet from the Middle French gant meaning "glove," so if you want to go "antiquated," without the u would be the older spelling. I honestly have never seen that word spelled without the u outside of ME texts. I don't think of it as the antiquated spelling at all.
 
2013-09-19 02:50:49 AM  
Maybe I'm old school, like I went to school in the 80's, but the comma (here referred to as the Oxford comma) was graded pretty strictly. Sentence structure was also factored into it. Constant use of a similar length of sentence was frowned upon, so the comma became necessary to avoid reader fatigue.

This deciding to make up language rules because you don't like them? OK for e. e.  cummings, but who the fark are you? But even his material is undergoing a revisionist movement and is now "properly punctuated", despite how it is written on the original page.
 
2013-09-19 03:22:20 AM  
Using commas is like using words: When it does what you want it to do you're doing it right. If it doesn't you're doing it wrong.
 
2013-09-19 07:47:13 AM  
These rules aren't common knowledge?  I guess I was properly educated because these rules all seem natural to me.
 
2013-09-19 11:52:07 AM  
When beginning a statement with the word "however" you should always follow it with a verbal "comma".  It is also to be injected into another's statement if they fail to do so themselves.
 
2013-09-19 02:02:22 PM  
LOL comma dead rules LOL
 
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