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(CNN)   Seven popular scams that steakhouses use to fool you into spending money. Your dog wants aged beef kidney suet   (eatocracy.cnn.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Men's Wearhouse, Joshua Ozersky, Food & Wine, food festivals, MasterChef  
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27412 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Sep 2013 at 1:09 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-17 10:29:58 AM  
A1 sauce curiously missing?
 
2013-09-17 10:39:40 AM  
#1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.
 
2013-09-17 10:59:34 AM  

sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.


No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).
 
2013-09-17 12:04:06 PM  

sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.


Oddly enough, considering that I tend to cook steaks forty or fifty times a night, yeah, I DO think that. Because I have a lot more practice at it.

Steakhouses are machines that produce a commodity, and they sell the concept, and the execution is often shoddy, because many of them take a franchise approach that is just simply a fast food mentality, written onto a menu that is a dang sight pricier, but still it is a franchise, turn and burn approach. Buyer beware.

The list is not a bad one. There are a lot of folks who are willing to sell you crap, and tell you it's manna from Heaven, and they're doing so at a huge markup, and well beyond the usual. There is a reason that you don't visit chains if you want good food: they're not interested in good food, only selling you what they can, at fairly obscene profit margins, and hope that they can stuff you to the gills so you don't realize how badly they've rooked you.
 
2013-09-17 12:07:14 PM  

hubiestubert: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

Oddly enough, considering that I tend to cook steaks forty or fifty times a night, yeah, I DO think that. Because I have a lot more practice at it.

Steakhouses are machines that produce a commodity, and they sell the concept, and the execution is often shoddy, because many of them take a franchise approach that is just simply a fast food mentality, written onto a menu that is a dang sight pricier, but still it is a franchise, turn and burn approach. Buyer beware.

The list is not a bad one. There are a lot of folks who are willing to sell you crap, and tell you it's manna from Heaven, and they're doing so at a huge markup, and well beyond the usual. There is a reason that you don't visit chains if you want good food: they're not interested in good food, only selling you what they can, at fairly obscene profit margins, and hope that they can stuff you to the gills so you don't realize how badly they've rooked you.


Are you aware of any of the things in the article? kidney suet? WTF??
 
2013-09-17 12:17:35 PM  
I like that he sneaked in a dig at Robert Parker as well, so he can piss off the wine snobs as well as the steak snobs. Multi-faceted troll, always the best kind.
 
2013-09-17 12:21:44 PM  
List fails without $12 wedge salad
 
2013-09-17 12:28:12 PM  

hubiestubert: There is a reason that you don't visit chains if you want good food:


Bam.  *Never* go to farking chains unless forced.  And if you do...never order steak.  I haven't willingly been to a chain in years.  And when I did go, they nuked the fark out of anything that sounded good.  NOTE: if you get stuck going to a chain, it's hard to fark up Fettuccine Alfredo...yeah, it's not the greatest and it's probably microwaved Sysco food but at least it's edible.

revrendjim: No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


Here in Texas, we have HEB who started offering prime cuts last year.  It's typically around $13-$14 a pound though it comes down to $9 and sometimes, once in a blue moon, $7.  But you can also find good stuff in grocery stores if you know what to look for.  Randall's here (Val and Safeway and Tom Thumb for those in other states) will often have decent meat.  And if they ever put their uncut roasts on sale, get them and cut your own steaks as the are pretty decent for cheaper steak beef.
 
wee
2013-09-17 12:29:30 PM  

hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it


And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.  The only trick is finding good beef.  And since the wife knows a local rancher who can get us meat from a cow that was never fed corn (and then drugs to digest that corn), it's really no trick at all.

I know it sounds like bravado, and I don't mean to impugn your profession or skills, but I can't get a restaurant steak better than I can make at home, unless I go to one of those places that has vats of constantly-reducing beef stock and a dry-aging room and the like.  But like Ruth's Chris or whatever?  No comparison whatsoever.
 
2013-09-17 12:45:31 PM  
My local butcher shop (who already had the best steaks I've found) just renovated to include a dry-aging room. They might as well have hooked a vacuum up to my wallet.
 
2013-09-17 12:46:38 PM  

wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.  The only trick is finding good beef.  And since the wife knows a local rancher who can get us meat from a cow that was never fed corn (and then drugs to digest that corn), it's really no trick at all.

I know it sounds like bravado, and I don't mean to impugn your profession or skills, but I can't get a restaurant steak better than I can make at home, unless I go to one of those places that has vats of constantly-reducing beef stock and a dry-aging room and the like.  But like Ruth's Chris or whatever?  No comparison whatsoever.


Oddly enough, I've used sous verde, and I pretty much despise them. Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...
 
2013-09-17 12:52:41 PM  
Wedge salads, or anything else you feed food.
 
2013-09-17 01:00:38 PM  
8. THE STEAKS ARE FROM SYSCO !!!!111!!!!11!!

Thanks CNN.
 
2013-09-17 01:11:04 PM  
1% problems.
 
2013-09-17 01:12:56 PM  
Then there are the places that try to get away with the steaks pieced together via transglutaminase.
 
2013-09-17 01:13:05 PM  
Wet Dry-Aging

Well, whatever the hell Kevin Rathbun Steak is doing to its dry-aged Porterhouse for two is worth it.  That steak is like nothing I can buy in the store or make myself.  I can't get flavors like that.
 
2013-09-17 01:14:14 PM  
These are the techniques of many fields, like real estate, not just steakhouses.
 
2013-09-17 01:15:17 PM  
I'll tell you what. You can get a good look at a butcher's ass by sticking your head up there. But, wouldn't you rather to take his word for it?No, what I mean is, you can get a good look at a T-bone by sticking your head up a butcher's ass... No, wait. It's gotta be your bull...
 
2013-09-17 01:15:27 PM  

revrendjim: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


Call around.

There's a local chain where I grew up (St. Louis, Straub's Market) that sells USDA Prime beef.

You're looking at $15+/lb for a sirloin, but that sirloin is better than the best rib eye you've ever bought at the supermarket.
 
2013-09-17 01:16:22 PM  

costermonger: My local butcher shop (who already had the best steaks I've found) just renovated to include a dry-aging room. They might as well have hooked a vacuum up to my wallet.


Shutupandtakemymoney.jpg
 
2013-09-17 01:17:33 PM  
Author goes to the wrong steakhouses.   And as for chains, Ruth's Chris is actually good and consistent.  Otherwise, I dine local.

And for those who cook their own, I'll leave this here  http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/the-food-lab-7-old-wives-tales-abo u t-cooking-steak.html
The "reverse sear" is great.
 
2013-09-17 01:18:01 PM  
Meh.  I get my steaks from my cousin, who's too cheap to spend money to fatten his cows, so they're totally "pastured raised, organic" - they taste great, and it's $3.50 a pound.  Can't argue with that.
 
2013-09-17 01:18:56 PM  
I'm surprised there's no mention of "NEVER PUT ANYTHING BUT SALT AND PEPPER ON YOUR STEAK."

/I like a little Montreal steak seasoning
//And a lot of mushrooms and onions
 
2013-09-17 01:20:00 PM  
Steak connoisseurs on Fark? Big surprise.

What wine goes best with bloviating spittle?
 
2013-09-17 01:20:25 PM  

costermonger: My local butcher shop (who already had the best steaks I've found) just renovated to include a dry-aging room. They might as well have hooked a vacuum up to my wallet.


I need to find me your butcher and give him a large percentage of my money.  Amazingly the best steak I had this past Summer was frozen mail order, and it wasn't from anywhere near Omaha.  It came with a surf and turf package from Maine, it was a boneless strip, perfect thickness, seared well and actually had taste to it.
 
2013-09-17 01:21:20 PM  
Meat Glue.

Look it up. Restaurants literally use this special glue to make small pieces of meat into steak-like sizes and sell them as such.

Meat Glue. Think about that for a moment. Taking the farking piss, as we say in UK-land.
 
2013-09-17 01:21:32 PM  
I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...
 
2013-09-17 01:22:20 PM  

sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

 
2013-09-17 01:23:03 PM  
Around Chicago there are plenty of places to get prime meat. The trick is paying for it, which I have found little enthusiasm for.

Top notch steakhouses often have very high output broilers, ceramic things that can put out 1600 degrees. I don't have access to that at home. Or a sous vide machine.

I can, however, make better chicken than any restaurant I've ever had. I think chicken is far trickier to cook properly than steak anyway. Any moron with a blowtorch can cook steak. Chicken has to be done just right or it's destroyed. So there.
 
2013-09-17 01:23:07 PM  
I'm going to a steakhouse tonight and I know what they will use to get this fool to overspend.

BOOZE.
 
2013-09-17 01:23:28 PM  
My friends know some meat people. So when I go visit my folks they always load me up with whatever they have overflowing from the freezer. I get to see them this weekend hmmmmmm.
 
2013-09-17 01:25:02 PM  
Waffle House.  Pan-fry that shiat in bacon grease and Pam.  Add Tabasco and an egg.
 
2013-09-17 01:26:11 PM  

hubiestubert: You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...


Well, that escalated quickly.

We get it - you're an arteest, and the rest of us who lack the appreciation necessary for bagged salad with boiled eggs on top, toast with beans, or roast beast a la heat lamp can go back to our gruel.  Which in my case last night, consisted of olive oil poached prawns (from my homemade sous vide rig), leg of lamb with a yogurt and thyme crust (recipe from a Greek grandma), roasted tri-color fingerling potatoes with herbs, locally sourced rustic greens, and flourless chocolate cake with black pepper.

I guess the fact that I didn't cook it for several hundred covers makes it pretty-much inedible, though.  I'll let my dinner guests know.

But seriously - I know it takes alot of talent, hard work and discipline to make not only good but also consistent food, time and again, hundreds of times a night.  Not everyone can do it, and even fewer can do it well.  But don't pretend no one else can cook a steak, that's just pretentious.
 
2013-09-17 01:26:22 PM  
Lemme ask you something, chief, have you ever grilled before? Anything at all? Ever? You look befuddled. You wanna flip that one, I'm telling you, you're gonna burn it. They're gonna be like hockey pucks. I'm just sayin'. I used to be a grillmaster at a summer camp and I would consider some sauces. Just sayin'.

OW! Hey, MJ, we should hang out! (foom)
 
2013-09-17 01:27:05 PM  

hubiestubert: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

Oddly enough, considering that I tend to cook steaks forty or fifty times a night, yeah, I DO think that. Because I have a lot more practice at it.



You have practice mass producing a standardized product. You do not necessarily have experience crafting a quality product. There is a very distinct difference.
 
2013-09-17 01:27:12 PM  

Girl Sailor: Top notch steakhouses often have very high output broilers, ceramic things that can put out 1600 degrees.


Alton Brown had a segment specifically on how to get around this using hardwood coals and a chimney starter to cook a porterhouse steak.  I haven't tried it yet, but it seemed legit, and too simple not to give it a shot.
 
2013-09-17 01:27:23 PM  

Port1080: Meh.  I get my steaks from my cousin, who's too cheap to spend money to fatten his cows, so they're totally "pastured raised, organic" - they taste great, and it's $3.50 a pound.  Can't argue with that.


The trick is to get the up hill side of the cow. The side that was down hill supported most of the cows weight and will be tough and chewy.
 
2013-09-17 01:27:44 PM  
Local butcher (Critchfield's) never steers me wrong. Every town should have one, and a good bakery.
 
2013-09-17 01:28:47 PM  

cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...


Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.
 
2013-09-17 01:28:53 PM  

hubiestubert: wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.  The only trick is finding good beef.  And since the wife knows a local rancher who can get us meat from a cow that was never fed corn (and then drugs to digest that corn), it's really no trick at all.

I know it sounds like bravado, and I don't mean to impugn your profession or skills, but I can't get a restaurant steak better than I can make at home, unless I go to one of those places that has vats of constantly-reducing beef stock and a dry-aging room and the like.  But like Ruth's Chris or whatever?  No comparison whatsoever.

Oddly enough, I've used sous verde, and I pretty much despise them. Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...


so you are mass producing a product to the tune of "hundreds a week" and wee can focus on just making his steak for himself and he knows exactly how he likes it and has a repeatable proven method he enjoys.  Why should it be a surprise or a perceived jab at your culinary chops that he is better able to satisfy himself (heh)?
 
2013-09-17 01:29:14 PM  
Smells like dicks in here.
 
2013-09-17 01:29:49 PM  

groppet: My friends know some meat people. So when I go visit my folks they always load me up with whatever they have overflowing from the freezer. I get to see them this weekend hmmmmmm.


3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-09-17 01:31:02 PM  
My rage-meter reaches critical whenever I am presented with the wet-aged beef scam. Not the poor/improper dry-aging mentioned in TFA.
 
2013-09-17 01:31:19 PM  
Due to time & economic restraints (the burden of a family - yadda-yadda) most of my "steak" comes chopped up on a bun and passed through my car window.
The thought of sitting down in a faded-era restaurant and served by well-endowed past-her-prime waitress sounds very appealing to me - even if the grill marks on my utility-grade horse meat was drawn on with a Sharpie.
 
2013-09-17 01:31:25 PM  

wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.



A crust w/ sous vide? bullshiat....unless you somehow created a machine that can superheat water to 400 deg F?  I assume you are searing your boiled steak?  I'll take a cast iron cooked steak anyday.

/I ran a steakhouse kitchen and was on the grill for years...
//I will not buy steak @ a restaurant.
 
2013-09-17 01:31:57 PM  
8. Getting you to fill up on the complimentary bread.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-17 01:32:08 PM  
Bookmark
 
2013-09-17 01:32:29 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: hubiestubert: You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...

Well, that escalated quickly.

We get it - you're an arteest, and the rest of us who lack the appreciation necessary for bagged salad with boiled eggs on top, toast with beans, or roast beast a la heat lamp can go back to our gruel.  Which in my case last night, consisted of olive oil poached prawns (from my homemade sous vide rig), leg of lamb with a yogurt and thyme crust (recipe from a Greek grandma), roasted tri-color fingerling potatoes with herbs, locally sourced rustic greens, and flourless chocolate cake with black pepper.

I guess the fact that I didn't cook it for several hundred covers makes it pretty-much inedible, though.  I'll let my dinner guests know.

But seriously - I know it takes alot of talent, hard work and discipline to make not only good but also consistent food, time and again, hundreds of times a night.  Not everyone can do it, and even fewer can do it well.  But don't pretend no one else can cook a steak, that's just pretentious.


www.sooverthis.com
 
2013-09-17 01:33:18 PM  

Carousel Beast: You have practice mass producing a standardized product. You do not necessarily have experience crafting a quality product. There is a very distinct difference.


Mass production brings us delicious chocolate...

forwardfromfifty.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-09-17 01:34:27 PM  

GungFu: Meat Glue.

Look it up. Restaurants literally use this special glue to make small pieces of meat into steak-like sizes and sell them as such.

Meat Glue. Think about that for a moment. Taking the farking piss, as we say in UK-land.


It's nothing new, especially if you've ever eaten imitation crab (it's used in lots of other things).  It's only now becoming more well-known because of travel and cooking shows where they may show a chef taking a thin slice of duck, a slice of pork, and a slice of beef and glueing them into a single "steak".
 
2013-09-17 01:34:29 PM  
Screw it.  A couple of Cutty and Cokes to start, and it's all good.
 
2013-09-17 01:34:38 PM  
That's why I prefer to cook/grill my own. As long as the cut of meat comes from urban range cows, I'm good to go!
/especially the ones raised on a rooftop ranch
//not from a skyscraper rooftop as those usually have to much 'windburn'
 
2013-09-17 01:35:14 PM  

hubiestubert: wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.  The only trick is finding good beef.  And since the wife knows a local rancher who can get us meat from a cow that was never fed corn (and then drugs to digest that corn), it's really no trick at all.

I know it sounds like bravado, and I don't mean to impugn your profession or skills, but I can't get a restaurant steak better than I can make at home, unless I go to one of those places that has vats of constantly-reducing beef stock and a dry-aging room and the like.  But like Ruth's Chris or whatever?  No comparison whatsoever.

Oddly enough, I've used sous verde, and I pretty much despise them. Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...


Dude, this is Fark.  That's pretty much the mission statement for this place.
 
2013-09-17 01:36:43 PM  
Pittsburgh rare strip steaks are glorious.
 
2013-09-17 01:36:45 PM  

green4mice: That's why I prefer to cook/grill my own. As long as the cut of meat comes from urban range cows, I'm good to go!
/especially the ones raised on a rooftop ranch
//not from a skyscraper rooftop as those usually have to much 'windburn'


+1
 
2013-09-17 01:36:59 PM  

born_yesterday: Girl Sailor: Top notch steakhouses often have very high output broilers, ceramic things that can put out 1600 degrees.

Alton Brown had a segment specifically on how to get around this using hardwood coals and a chimney starter to cook a porterhouse steak.  I haven't tried it yet, but it seemed legit, and too simple not to give it a shot.


I haven't seen Alton's version but we did what you describe to sear tuna. We called it the afterburner.
 
2013-09-17 01:38:20 PM  

revrendjim: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


I have a butcher shop close to me that only sells organic grass fed free roam and 'all that other bullshiat' type of meats.  They actually buy the animals alive from local farmers and do all the butchering themselves.  You can get really, and i mean really farking good cuts from them.  I usually don't buy in to that organic hippy bullshiat when it comes to food, but holy hell those steaks are good.  Everything is very expensive there tho, 8-25 bucks a pound depending on what you get.  For superbowl I got a dry aged rib eye from them, and they cut it right off the half rack of cow ribs sitting in the display.  It was 34 ounces, beautifully marbled, and amazingly good.
 
2013-09-17 01:41:44 PM  

Wellon Dowd: 8. Getting you to fill up on the complimentary bread.

[i.imgur.com image 600x449]


This is especially true at "all you can eat crab leg" type affairs.
 
2013-09-17 01:42:35 PM  
There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.
 
2013-09-17 01:42:45 PM  

green4mice: That's why I prefer to cook/grill my own. As long as the cut of meat comes from urban range cows, I'm good to go!
/especially the ones raised on a rooftop ranch
//not from a skyscraper rooftop as those usually have to much 'windburn'

 
2013-09-17 01:43:45 PM  
Sides.

If I'm the only one who wants shoestring fries, why should I have to order (and pay for) enough to feed the entire table?
 
2013-09-17 01:44:03 PM  
It never ceases to amaze me how every farker somehow manages to be a foremost expert in every field while still having plenty of time to talk about how they are a foremost expert in every field on Fark for hours on end.
 
2013-09-17 01:44:19 PM  

McGrits: born_yesterday: Girl Sailor: Top notch steakhouses often have very high output broilers, ceramic things that can put out 1600 degrees.

Alton Brown had a segment specifically on how to get around this using hardwood coals and a chimney starter to cook a porterhouse steak.  I haven't tried it yet, but it seemed legit, and too simple not to give it a shot.

I haven't seen Alton's version but we did what you describe to sear tuna. We called it the afterburner.


I saw that episode, thought that I really should try that. So it works pretty well? I have to do it. Too bad the Mrs. considers anything below medium to be raw. I've worn her down though - years ago she would get ill if I presented meat that was recognizable as meat and not the charcoal that cooked it.
 
2013-09-17 01:44:31 PM  

PanicMan: cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...

Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.


You should go.  They use suet (lard leaf) with butter to drizzle on the steaks.  Whatever this guy says, they're outstanding.  The bacon thing is a ripoff, but to my knowledge no one has ever ordered the bacon at Peter Luger.  You get the tomato and onion with steak sauce appetizer and the steak.  Maybe a side or two if you're extra hungry.
 
2013-09-17 01:44:39 PM  
I don't have to worry about any of this as I am a vegetarian and am healthier than you are.
 
2013-09-17 01:45:40 PM  

chrisco123: I don't have to worry about any of this as I am a vegetarian and am healthier than you are.


8/10 - should have gone with 'vegan'.
 
2013-09-17 01:46:37 PM  

Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.


Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!
 
2013-09-17 01:48:12 PM  
A couple of my tenants run cattle on the big corners or non-farmable areas of land. Sometimes I get lucky and get an entire cow full of 'unlabeled' usda prime. Usually, though, it is 'just way better than you can buy at the store' grade... which is good, but I'm not fooling myself into imagining it into prime beef. I hate buying beef at the grocery store and usually stick to the custom cutters when/if I buy it. My local guy does an awesome job with dry-aging and I'll have him do a 22-28 day age on the best loins when I have whole beeves or sides done in his shop.

Most of my hamburger comes from the grocery store, but with a kind of a twist. Many grocery stores around here put their cheapo steak cuts like select sirloin or ribeye on sale for at or less than the cost of decent hamburger meat. Most of the stores will custom grind hamburger over 10 pounds for free. So... I'll ask the meat market guy if he has any uncut sirloins or ribeyes in the back, have him weight it out at the sale price (and sometimes get a little additional price break since it isn't cut), and he pitches it in the grinder. Ground sirloin/ribeye for the same or less cost than the pre-packaged scrap meat hamburger.
 
2013-09-17 01:48:37 PM  

2KanZam: wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.


A crust w/ sous vide? bullshiat....unless you somehow created a machine that can superheat water to 400 deg F?  I assume you are searing your boiled steak?  I'll take a cast iron cooked steak anyday.

/I ran a steakhouse kitchen and was on the grill for years...
//I will not buy steak @ a restaurant.


No dumbass.  Sous vide brings it to the exact internal temp. Searing the crust happens on a very high heat grill for just a minute or two.  If you ran a kitchen you should have been able to figure that out so I assume you didn't.
 
2013-09-17 01:49:04 PM  

Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.


+1.  Never met a steak I didn't like.  Some are better than others, sure, but they're always pretty good.

Same goes for coffee and beer.
 
2013-09-17 01:49:52 PM  
firedaily.com
 
2013-09-17 01:50:53 PM  
I was going to ask hubie about transglutaminase not being on that list, and what his opinion and/or experience with kitchens using it was, but I think I'll wait until the flames die down a bit...
 
2013-09-17 01:51:07 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Well, that escalated quickly.

We get it - you're an arteest, and the rest of us who lack the appreciation necessary for bagged salad with boiled eggs on top, toast with beans, or roast beast a la heat lamp can go back to our gruel. Which in my case last night, consisted of olive oil poached prawns (from my homemade sous vide rig), leg of lamb with a yogurt and thyme crust (recipe from a Greek grandma), roasted tri-color fingerling potatoes with herbs, locally sourced rustic greens, and flourless chocolate cake with black pepper.

I guess the fact that I didn't cook it for several hundred covers makes it pretty-much inedible, though. I'll let my dinner guests know.

But seriously - I know it takes alot of talent, hard work and discipline to make not only good but also consistent food, time and again, hundreds of times a night. Not everyone can do it, and even fewer can do it well. But don't pretend no one else can cook a steak, that's just pretentious.


This, people, is how you troll. After all that tripe, he accuses the other guy of being pretentious. I broke out laughing.
 
2013-09-17 01:54:54 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: chrisco123: I don't have to worry about any of this as I am a vegetarian and am healthier than you are.

8/10 - should have gone with 'vegan'.


I thought the article was interesting, plus the discussion between the two steak masters was surreal.

/vegan
//don't worry, we'll let you know
 
2013-09-17 01:56:07 PM  
I, for one, happen to like the Costco NY strip.  Picking up another three pack tomorrow.
 
2013-09-17 01:57:01 PM  
Yeah, well, can you bring me some ketchup. Mmm. Mmm. Nothin' sets off the flavor of a steak like some ketchup.

Well done.
 
2013-09-17 01:57:13 PM  

nosferatublue: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!


Is it me or are the steaks at those chains (Outback, Applebee's, TGIF, Ruby Tuesday's, etc.) mediocre at best?  Not trying to be a snob, but I can grill a better steak than those chain places and at a cheaper price to boot.
 
2013-09-17 01:59:56 PM  

blatz514: groppet: My friends know some meat people. So when I go visit my folks they always load me up with whatever they have overflowing from the freezer. I get to see them this weekend hmmmmmm.

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 400x300]


awesome and gross
 
2013-09-17 02:02:34 PM  

PsyLord: nosferatublue: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!

Is it me or are the steaks at those chains (Outback, Applebee's, TGIF, Ruby Tuesday's, etc.) mediocre at best?  Not trying to be a snob, but I can grill a better steak than those chain places and at a cheaper price to boot.


Quite possibly.

I can't speak for the rest of us, but when Mrs. Blue and I are going out the primary objective is to get away from home/domesticity/kids for a few hours. So there's that.
 
2013-09-17 02:03:11 PM  

2KanZam: A crust w/ sous vide? bullshiat....unless you somehow created a machine that can superheat water to 400 deg F? I assume you are searing your boiled steak? I'll take a cast iron cooked steak anyday.


I thought that was hwo it was done.

I am tempted to try the trick where you sear it, then seal it in a bag, and put it in a big cooler that has been filled with water at 140 deg fro 45 minutes (may be off on temp and time, I am qutoing from memory) just to see hwo it is.
 
2013-09-17 02:05:34 PM  

hubiestubert: wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.  The only trick is finding good beef.  And since the wife knows a local rancher who can get us meat from a cow that was never fed corn (and then drugs to digest that corn), it's really no trick at all.

I know it sounds like bravado, and I don't mean to impugn your profession or skills, but I can't get a restaurant steak better than I can make at home, unless I go to one of those places that has vats of constantly-reducing beef stock and a dry-aging room and the like.  But like Ruth's Chris or whatever?  No comparison whatsoever.

Oddly enough, I've used sous verde, and I pretty much despise them. Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...


I see what you did there!
 
2013-09-17 02:09:32 PM  
Cook?  You actually cook your steak?  All you need to do is knock it's horns off, wipe it's nasty ass and plop it down on the plate.
 
2013-09-17 02:10:40 PM  

HaywoodJablonski: List fails without $12 wedge salad


That is soooo 2002.
I think the wedge salad fad has come and gone.  Thankfully.
 
2013-09-17 02:11:49 PM  
Eh. Theres a place in McLean called The Organic Butcher. It may not be USDA Prime, but I got a solid ribeye and NY strip. Seared in good butter on cast iron and finished in the oven at 500 degrees for a few minutes, topped with compound butter, I was happy and so was my bf. I added in a *gasp* cheap Malbec and put duck fat roasted potatoes on the side. No complaints.
 
2013-09-17 02:12:12 PM  

PsyLord: nosferatublue: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!

Is it me or are the steaks at those chains (Outback, Applebee's, TGIF, Ruby Tuesday's, etc.) mediocre at best?  Not trying to be a snob, but I can grill a better steak than those chain places and at a cheaper price to boot.


What exactly are you expecting? A chain provides a decent and consistent meal usually at a reasonable price. If you want gourmet go to a gourmet place. And yeah most people can do similar things if not better at home. You still have to shop for it and then make it. A lot of people do not like to cook and good enough is good enough. Hell I was in NY earlier this year and we went to this local sandwich shop. It had a decent amount of people in it and we thought we'd give it a try. Worst sandwich I've ever had. Neither of us could finish it because it was so bad. Seriously I'll eat damn near anything and it was that bad. So we went to a McDonald next door. Yeah yeah we should have just gone to another "local" place but at that point we just wanted something that we knew would be ok. Chains have their place and so does everything else.
 
2013-09-17 02:13:47 PM  
www.thevioletroom.co.uk

SUET! SUET! SUET!
 
2013-09-17 02:14:16 PM  
nosferatublue:

I can't speak for the rest of us, but when Mrs. Blue and I are going out the primary objective is to get away from home/domesticity/kids for a few hours. So there's that.

True dat.  I can make a steak every bit as good as the best steakhouse in NYC (I don't claim that of other kinds of restaurants -- it's just that it's so simple to make a great steak).  I can even make sides almost as good now that I've discovered duck fat.  What I can't do is make separate appetizers for everyone at the table, spend a million dollars or more on the room in which I serve all that stuff and arrange for someone to bring and take away all the dishes.  Also, breads, pastries and desserts.  I suck at breads, pastries and desserts.
 
2013-09-17 02:14:18 PM  

Sliding Carp: Screw it.  A couple of Cutty and Cokes to start, and it's all good.


Hork
 
2013-09-17 02:14:35 PM  

liam76: 2KanZam: A crust w/ sous vide? bullshiat....unless you somehow created a machine that can superheat water to 400 deg F? I assume you are searing your boiled steak? I'll take a cast iron cooked steak anyday.

I thought that was hwo it was done.

I am tempted to try the trick where you sear it, then seal it in a bag, and put it in a big cooler that has been filled with water at 140 deg fro 45 minutes (may be off on temp and time, I am qutoing from memory) just to see hwo it is.


That is how it's done.  He seems to be saying he gets a crust on his steak from his sous vide machine...he does not.
 
2013-09-17 02:15:21 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: PanicMan: cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...

Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.

You should go.  They use suet (lard leaf) with butter to drizzle on the steaks.  Whatever this guy says, they're outstanding.  The bacon thing is a ripoff, but to my knowledge no one has ever ordered the bacon at Peter Luger.  You get the tomato and onion with steak sauce appetizer and the steak.  Maybe a side or two if you're extra hungry.


Cool, thanks.  Faith in humanity: restored.
 
2013-09-17 02:15:27 PM  

wax_on: 2KanZam: wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.


A crust w/ sous vide? bullshiat....unless you somehow created a machine that can superheat water to 400 deg F?  I assume you are searing your boiled steak?  I'll take a cast iron cooked steak anyday.

/I ran a steakhouse kitchen and was on the grill for years...
//I will not buy steak @ a restaurant.

No dumbass.  Sous vide brings it to the exact internal temp. Searing the crust happens on a very high heat grill for just a minute or two.  If you ran a kitchen you should have been able to figure that out so I assume you didn't.


Um...I think you are mistaken on who to call the dumbass.  He seems to be saying that he gets a crust from his sous vide machine.  Dumbass.
 
2013-09-17 02:15:49 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: nosferatublue:

I can't speak for the rest of us, but when Mrs. Blue and I are going out the primary objective is to get away from home/domesticity/kids for a few hours. So there's that.

True dat.  I can make a steak every bit as good as the best steakhouse in NYC (I don't claim that of other kinds of restaurants -- it's just that it's so simple to make a great steak).  I can even make sides almost as good now that I've discovered duck fat.  What I can't do is make separate appetizers for everyone at the table, spend a million dollars or more on the room in which I serve all that stuff and arrange for someone to bring and take away all the dishes.  Also, breads, pastries and desserts.  I suck at breads, pastries and desserts.


If you have a stand mixer, SimplyRecipes has a crazy easy chocolate bourbon bundt cake. Its pretty foolproof.
 
2013-09-17 02:17:25 PM  

nosferatublue: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!


Man, they advertised "Australian" food!  I took an Australian friend of mine there and he said it wasn't anything like what he ate in Australia. I demanded my money back, of course.
 
2013-09-17 02:17:45 PM  
I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.
 
2013-09-17 02:19:29 PM  

CruJones: And as for chains, Ruth's Chris is actually good and consistent.


i went to one in pasadena a couple of years back, and it was pretty 'meh.' first of all, they served omaha steaks, which are generally mediocre to begin with. second of all, an 8oz filet, a side of asparagus and a glass of cabernet (nothing fancy - a rodney strong, as i recall) came to around $100. if i hadn't been on an expense account, i would have complained.

the only chain steak that i've really enjoyed was one from fleming's.
 
2013-09-17 02:20:17 PM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.


Getting truly rare with a good sear can be a little challenging, but not very. But I also only cook as a hobby, not professionally. I would expect more from a steakhouse.
 
2013-09-17 02:21:57 PM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.


I think most places are too scared to serve at such a low internal temp.
 
2013-09-17 02:22:21 PM  

revrendjim: No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


28 day dry aged waygu and it's still half the price of a prime steak at a steakhouse.
http://fairwaypacking.com/

Now you know someone
 
2013-09-17 02:25:08 PM  

hubiestubert: wee: hubiestubert: Because I have a lot more practice at it

And I made myself a sous vide machine.  I can get a steak with a perfect crust while also having almost zero transition zone between that crust and the perfectly medium-rare exactly 128 degree interior. It's straight-up cheating.  The only trick is finding good beef.  And since the wife knows a local rancher who can get us meat from a cow that was never fed corn (and then drugs to digest that corn), it's really no trick at all.

I know it sounds like bravado, and I don't mean to impugn your profession or skills, but I can't get a restaurant steak better than I can make at home, unless I go to one of those places that has vats of constantly-reducing beef stock and a dry-aging room and the like.  But like Ruth's Chris or whatever?  No comparison whatsoever.

Oddly enough, I've used sous verde, and I pretty much despise them. Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

You feel good with your skills, then drive on. I only have 25 years of professional experience to fall back upon for preparation, only a several hundred steaks and other cuts a week, and a merciless public craving both novel and classical preparations to satisfy. And all the while having to concentrate on not just beef, lamb, pork, chicken, sauces, vegetables, salad, pairings for beer, wine and more. Nope. There is no way that I could ever satisfy a gourmand like yourself...

In the meantime, I guess I can continue to be paid for my shameful waste of time...


LIghten up, Francis. I will certainly stipulate that you can grill a steak better than I can, and certainly you can cook 50 steaks a night with complete consistency. I'm sure you serve fantastic meals.

As for the cooking time for sous vide, that's a plus for me: season up a steak or two, into ziploc bags, and into the mini ice chest charged with hot tap water checked with an instant read thermometer and tucked out of the way, to be checked and recharged just once, in a half hour or so. Now I have all the time in the world to put together the rest of the meal, chat, keep an eye on the game or movie, make drinks, etc without being shackled to the grill for fear of the main dish turning into a workboot.

When all's ready, three minutes in a red-hot pan puts on a lovely sear while everything else is plating.

Dump and rinse the cooler and it stows in a cupboard til next time.
 
2013-09-17 02:26:15 PM  

Space Station Wagon: revrendjim: No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).

28 day dry aged waygu and it's still half the price of a prime steak at a steakhouse.
http://fairwaypacking.com/

Now you know someone


Ordering meat over the internet makes me a bit nervous, have you had them before?
 
2013-09-17 02:27:13 PM  

PrivateCaboose: Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.

Getting truly rare with a good sear can be a little challenging, but not very. But I also only cook as a hobby, not professionally. I would expect more from a steakhouse.


I'm a charcoal guy.  I pile the coals on one side of the grill so I have both direct and indirect heat.  I put the steaks right over the coals for about a minute a side to let the flames lick them and get some nice grill marks.  Then I move them off the coals and cover the grill for about two minutes.  I take mine off then so it's rare.  I flip my wife's over and let it go another two minutes so it's more medium-rare.  It's almost impossible to fark it up.
 
2013-09-17 02:27:30 PM  

PanicMan: cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...

Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.


Yeah, it's not subtle at all, yet they're #1 on the Zagat list of best steakhouses in the city.  There are far better steaks to be had in Manhattan, IMO.  I love Keens.
 
2013-09-17 02:28:20 PM  

Space Station Wagon: revrendjim: No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).

28 day dry aged waygu and it's still half the price of a prime steak at a steakhouse.
http://fairwaypacking.com/

Now you know someone


Jesus Christ you have to be serious about beef for that. Also have $400 to spend on steaks . . .
 
2013-09-17 02:28:27 PM  

animal900: I, for one, happen to like the Costco NY strip.  Picking up another three pack tomorrow.



And Costco sells prime beef at a reasonable price(10-12$/lb for NY, Ribeye, Ribeye roast)
 
2013-09-17 02:29:01 PM  

Space Station Wagon: revrendjim: No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).

28 day dry aged waygu and it's still half the price of a prime steak at a steakhouse.
http://fairwaypacking.com/

Now you know someone


hmm, relevant.
 
2013-09-17 02:30:42 PM  

Well I use Mac/Linux...: PrivateCaboose: Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.

Getting truly rare with a good sear can be a little challenging, but not very. But I also only cook as a hobby, not professionally. I would expect more from a steakhouse.

I'm a charcoal guy.  I pile the coals on one side of the grill so I have both direct and indirect heat.  I put the steaks right over the coals for about a minute a side to let the flames lick them and get some nice grill marks.  Then I move them off the coals and cover the grill for about two minutes.  I take mine off then so it's rare.  I flip my wife's over and let it go another two minutes so it's more medium-rare.  It's almost impossible to fark it up.


I live in an apartment, so no grill. But honestly after finding cast iron seared steaks, I won't be going back to a grill. I make it pretty indulgent, with all the butter and deglazing the pan to male a roux, so we don't have it often, but I prefer it to a grilled steak.
 
2013-09-17 02:30:48 PM  
I'm going to Outback, ordering the Outback Special with the loaded potato, house salad, and maybe a fried onion thing and you want to know what?  I'm going to enjoy the hell out of it, the rest of y'all can just pucker up and kiss my ass.

Waitress, can I get some ketchup over here?  mmmmm, nothing brings out the taste of a perfectly cooked medium rare steak like a whole bunch of ketchup.
 
2013-09-17 02:31:06 PM  

Thunderboy: PanicMan: cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...

Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.

Yeah, it's not subtle at all, yet they're #1 on the Zagat list of best steakhouses in the city.  There are far better steaks to be had in Manhattan, IMO.  I love Keens.


What about Brooklyn?  I've been stuck in NYC for work for the past few months and for the foreseeable future.  If I see one more goddamn menu that features hanger steak as their primary steak and acts like it's some great cut of beef I'm going to go crazy.  I don't care if it's a goddamn Sizzler if they have a decent ribeye at a decent price.
 
2013-09-17 02:31:26 PM  

chrisco123: I don't have to worry about any of this as I am a vegetarian and am healthier than you are.


and you have to be at your Pilates class in 26 minutes.

It seems to me that most steakhouses use from 'too much' to 'way too much' salt, masking the sins of their meat and/or cooks.  Can you even order it unseasoned?
 
2013-09-17 02:32:42 PM  

FlashHarry: CruJones: And as for chains, Ruth's Chris is actually good and consistent.

i went to one in pasadena a couple of years back, and it was pretty 'meh.' first of all, they served omaha steaks, which are generally mediocre to begin with. second of all, an 8oz filet, a side of asparagus and a glass of cabernet (nothing fancy - a rodney strong, as i recall) came to around $100. if i hadn't been on an expense account, i would have complained.

the only chain steak that i've really enjoyed was one from fleming's.


Ruth Chris in Pasadena is still a great steak, and no one has ever said that they don't charge for the ambience.
Also, Sizzler.
 
2013-09-17 02:33:10 PM  

revrendjim: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


Nonsense. Find a local (non-feedlot) farmer who raises decent meat, and you can get better cuts than any restaurant.
 
2013-09-17 02:36:11 PM  

jfivealive: Ordering meat over the internet makes me a bit nervous, have you had them before


I have not had the waygu, just a 16 ounce (If I remember right) 28 day dry aged bone in filet.
It was the best steak I have ever eaten, no BS. It does help that my friend is a grill master. They were cooked to perfection.

Also for a Football get together we are ordering these
8oz 28 Day Dry-Aged Wagyu Bone In New York Strip.
http://fairwaypacking.com/kobebeef-primebeef-piedmontesebeef-primeb eef/gourmet-beef/dry/28-day-dry-aged-waygu-bone-in-new-york-strip.html

PrivateCaboose: Jesus Christ you have to be serious about beef for that. Also have $400 to spend on steaks


You don't have to buy the whole cut, but my friends and I are planning on doing it some time and splitting the cost and cutting our own steaks,
 
2013-09-17 02:38:35 PM  
That should have been 18 ounce not 8 ounce.
 
2013-09-17 02:40:09 PM  
When I read that article, I imagined read in the voice of Ron Swanson:

http://ronsays.tumblr.com/
 
2013-09-17 02:40:37 PM  
Can't say I've suffered anything like these problems but I have felt cheated in a few.

The biggest ripoff I've suffered was a place called Lawry's Prime Rib in Chicago. Not steak but roast beef. The waiter was selling up on absolutely everything - "Can I have the rib?", "would you like surf and turf its the special tonight and blah blah blah", "no just the rib", "would you like the house special salad which is blah blah blah", "can I have the house white", "would you like to try this chablis (which happens to be 4x more) which we have in stock blah blah" and so on. On every damned choice. Waiter even had the gall to stick a "it is customary to tip 15%" card on the table.  I've never felt so used and the food was very mediocre.
 
2013-09-17 02:41:43 PM  
when we go out for steak we go to Texas Roadhouse.
steak snobs can bite my arse!
don't get me wrong, i know it's not the greatest steak in the world, but it is the ONLY restaurant chain where i've consistently had good service, a good tasting tender steak cooked to the doneness i ask for everytime, side items that i like, an atmosphere fit for the whole family, food the whole family will eat, reasonable prices, and shiner bock on tap in huge frosted mugs!
 
2013-09-17 02:43:07 PM  
I raise Black Angus for suppliers. In other words, have my own beef. Don't go to steakhouses.

/highly recommended
//go learn the art of dry aging
 
2013-09-17 02:43:42 PM  

cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...


I loved that place.

I skipped the sauce so I don't know if that description is accurate, but the bacon they serve isn't anything like what is described in the article, so I am guessing they are a bit butthurt it is #1.
 
wee
2013-09-17 02:45:56 PM  

hubiestubert: Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.


Well for a home cook like me, it's basically cheating.  And I don't mind the time issue, since it actually helps.  Basically once everything else is nearly done, 120 seconds in a exceedingly hot cast iron skillet.  Rest it and it's ready (and I typically make a quick sauce while the meat is resting).  Now if i had to serve 60 per night like you, I don't know if it's all that feasible unless you have a giant machine. And then what do you do with meat that's been heated but not ordered?

I've only had a steak better than what I can make at one place: http://www.alexanderssteakhouse.com/  All the rest fall short in some way.  (Honestly, I think they fail to measure up because of the quality of beef. The ranch-raised stuff we get damn near tastes like elk, it's totally free-range and has a really meaty/earthy flavor.)

2KanZam: A crust w/ sous vide? bullshiat....unless you somehow created a machine that can superheat water to 400 deg F? I assume you are searing your boiled steak? I'll take a cast iron cooked steak anyday.


Yeah, I finish it 60 seconds per side in a cast iron skillet as hot as I can make it.  Add a bit of oil, then a pat of butter just before the steak goes in. Nice, even brown crust and no brown transition zone.  Then I maybe throw a bit more butter and sliced mushrooms in the pan while the steaks rest.  Or whatever.

I'm not a expert chef by any means, but I can make a strip come out exactly like I want it to, and it's never overcooked or underdone.
 
2013-09-17 02:47:33 PM  
TFA:  Beef should be brown and crusty on the outside, not blackened and denatured and bitter and carcinogenic.

HORSE SHIAT.

A good steak should have beautfiully charred fat and exterior edges, with any BBQ-sauce (if used) blackened and carmelized to perfection.  Some bold, dark grill lines are just fine too.  The mix of taste and texture when combined with a nice mid-rare interior is what eating steak is all about.
 
2013-09-17 02:48:18 PM  
Being from Texas, BBQ qnd all, Next summer on vacation, I've wanted Peter Lugers for years, and now am gonna do it.

http://www.peterluger.com/
 
2013-09-17 02:51:16 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Cook?  You actually cook your steak?  All you need to do is knock it's horns off, wipe it's nasty ass and plop it down on the plate.


You don't wipe the ass, you fool. That's the creamed spinach.
 
2013-09-17 02:51:31 PM  

PsyLord: nosferatublue: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!

Is it me or are the steaks at those chains (Outback, Applebee's, TGIF, Ruby Tuesday's, etc.) mediocre at best?  Not trying to be a snob, but I can grill a better steak than those chain places and at a cheaper price to boot.


I'm in the hinterlands so all we know around these parts is mega-chain steak, but who goes to Applebee's or TGIF for a steak?  Those things are beyond atrocious.  At least Outback, Texas Roadhouse, Longhorn, etc. serve something that resembles beef, and at Texas Roadhouse they serve those addicting yeast rolls.

/gotta pace myself.  Can't fill up on the rolls.
//If it's looking bleak, sacrifice the salad.  It's just lettuce anyway.
 
2013-09-17 02:52:33 PM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.


Restaurants hate doing rare meat, I think. I was at a place in Indy a couple years ago and the friend I was with ordered rare. Came out medium rare. He told the waitress to have them put it on the grill for 30 seconds on each side and it's done. Still came out more towards medium rare.
 
2013-09-17 02:56:49 PM  

jfivealive: Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.

I think most places are too scared to serve at such a low internal temp.




That may be true. Then again I have the exact opposite taste in eggs. I like over very hard break the yolk. No one I've ever been to can figure that out.
 
wee
2013-09-17 02:57:54 PM  

johnny_vegas: so you are mass producing a product to the tune of "hundreds a week" and wee can focus on just making his steak for himself and he knows exactly how he likes it and has a repeatable proven method he enjoys. Why should it be a surprise or a perceived jab at your culinary chops that he is better able to satisfy himself


Hell, I know I could never hack it in a commercial kitchen.  But I also know that being a science nerd I need to figure out how to cook something just the way I like it.  So I built this: http://i.imgur.com/RY7BqXD.jpg  And now I can experiment with eggs, and scallops and asparagus and whatever.  It's fun, and if I wind up turning some awesome $14.99/pound strips into steaks exactly how I like them, all the better! :-) Cheaper than going out, anyway.

I also make my own bacon, pastrami, sausages, mustard, sauerkraut, pickles, kimchee, and a bunch of other things I could buy commercially but which aren't nearly quite as good as what I can produce.  Doesn't mean any chef type guys should take offense just because I have science projects all over my kitchen counter...
 
2013-09-17 02:59:28 PM  
FYI the 18oz 28 Day Dry-Aged Wagyu Bone In New York Strip.  is $40.49, Pretty reasonable since we can do asparagus, mashed potatoes and some other great sides for just a few dollars apiece.
Like I said half the price of almost any steak house. The last time I was at Mortons my steak was $80 by itself, the asparagus side was like $10. I would have never ordered it but we had a large gift card. I was sorely disappointed.
 
2013-09-17 03:01:17 PM  

PsyLord: nosferatublue: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

Seriously. I almost never eat beef steak (usually eating deer), but when I do, know where I get it?

OUTBACK! The OUTBACK SPECIAL! Cooked RARE! And I find it DELICIOUS!

THA HORRORZ!

Is it me or are the steaks at those chains (Outback, Applebee's, TGIF, Ruby Tuesday's, etc.) mediocre at best?  Not trying to be a snob, but I can grill a better steak than those chain places and at a cheaper price to boot.


Outback is not in the same league as those others you mention, but it's still pretty mediocre.
Outback still cooks their steaks  fresh and unadulterated, though they have consistently lowered their quality and portion size over then last 20 years. (The filet for instance used to be  always from the large end of the tenderloin. Now it is almost always from the small end. The ribeye too ) Not to mention the lower the portion size you receive. However they do still use USDA choice or above, which for the price range is fair.

Applebees, TGIF, Ruby Tuesdays etc ( What my friends and family call "shait on the walls places" )
however often use mechanically and chemically tenderized, cuts of select quality meat. It's no coincidence that those steaks are usually served with a jack daniels "glaze" or something on it to distract you. I believe Applebees does this to their chicken as well.

This is all very brand damaging in my opinion... restaurants need to buck up and raise prices.  People don't notice quality shifts right away but they will eventually start shying away from the restaurant, even if they can't quite put their finger on why.
 
2013-09-17 03:02:36 PM  
Best.  Pace.  Evar.

The old fashioneds are pretty killer too.
 
2013-09-17 03:03:26 PM  

FunkyBlue: Mid_mo_mad_man: I'm not a chef by no means but how hard is it to prepare a rare steak? It doesn't matter chain or local no one ever does it correct.

Restaurants hate doing rare meat, I think. I was at a place in Indy a couple years ago and the friend I was with ordered rare. Came out medium rare. He told the waitress to have them put it on the grill for 30 seconds on each side and it's done. Still came out more towards medium rare.




I don't know about hating rare but well done is hated. I was at a famous KC steakhouse and they had it mentioned point blank on menu no well done steaks will be served. And before you snicker we know are steak in the heartland.
 
2013-09-17 03:05:34 PM  

wee: johnny_vegas: so you are mass producing a product to the tune of "hundreds a week" and wee can focus on just making his steak for himself and he knows exactly how he likes it and has a repeatable proven method he enjoys. Why should it be a surprise or a perceived jab at your culinary chops that he is better able to satisfy himself

Hell, I know I could never hack it in a commercial kitchen.  But I also know that being a science nerd I need to figure out how to cook something just the way I like it.  So I built this: http://i.imgur.com/RY7BqXD.jpg  And now I can experiment with eggs, and scallops and asparagus and whatever.  It's fun, and if I wind up turning some awesome $14.99/pound strips into steaks exactly how I like them, all the better! :-) Cheaper than going out, anyway.

I also make my own bacon, pastrami, sausages, mustard, sauerkraut, pickles, kimchee, and a bunch of other things I could buy commercially but which aren't nearly quite as good as what I can produce.  Doesn't mean any chef type guys should take offense just because I have science projects all over my kitchen counter...


Alton Brown?
 
2013-09-17 03:05:40 PM  
Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.
 
2013-09-17 03:07:08 PM  
Had steak last night. Getting a kick...

/grass fed, hormone and anti-biotic free NY strip.
//I have a great butcher shop near me.
///Yes, the pooch got some.
 
2013-09-17 03:07:36 PM  

MadMonk: I'm going to Outback, ordering the Outback Special with the loaded potato, house salad, and maybe a fried onion thing and you want to know what?  I'm going to enjoy the hell out of it, the rest of y'all can just pucker up and kiss my ass.

Waitress, can I get some ketchup over here?  mmmmm, nothing brings out the taste of a perfectly cooked medium rare steak like a whole bunch of ketchup.


Pfft. Any good troglodyte knows that catsup (and note the spelling, too, moran) is used only when enjoying the finest cuts of beef cooked to the leathery bliss of well-done.
 
2013-09-17 03:08:45 PM  

URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.


This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.
 
2013-09-17 03:09:03 PM  

bungle_jr: when we go out for steak we go to Texas Roadhouse.


In back, they got some bungalows?

/for the people who like to go down slow
 
2013-09-17 03:09:25 PM  

URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly like the way they avoid lawsuits and complaints about food poisoning.

 
2013-09-17 03:10:08 PM  

sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.


it's perfectly possible that you can cook a good steak.

however, most people are terrible at cooking steaks. they molest it too much while it's on the grill.  they employ the retarded press down with the spatula method to destroy the steak.  They flip it too many times. they throw it on the grill before the grill is the right temperature, they don't let the steak come to temperature before cooking it, they overcook the steak, they cut into the steak to see if it's done, they poorly season it (which most likely includes overseasoning), and the worst of all, they serve it right from the grill without letting it rest.

oh well.  best steak on the grill is the hangar steak.  best beef product on earth (other than bone marrow) is chateaubriande or rib roast.  i don't see these items on a lot of steakhouse menus.
 
2013-09-17 03:12:31 PM  

Space Station Wagon


I have not had the waygu


How about the wagyu? Have you had that?
 
2013-09-17 03:13:31 PM  
All you steak aficionados should probably read up on Zilmax.  It's why cheap steak tastes like nothing and you have to salt the shiat out of it to make it worth eating.

http://money.msn.com/now/post.aspx?post=9d72a9ef-a970-4f39-b4c3-63af 5d 82c2e4
 
2013-09-17 03:13:38 PM  

tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.


She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.
 
2013-09-17 03:13:44 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: Yeah, well, can you bring me some ketchup. Mmm. Mmm. Nothin' sets off the flavor of a steak like some ketchup.

Well done.


I'm of the opinion that you're allowed to like what you like.

I, however, do not like what you like.
 
2013-09-17 03:14:19 PM  
Knowingly opening myself up to ridicule, here are some of my favorite steak places in case someone nearby wants to try them:

Honolulu:  Hy's http://hyshawaii.com/
Providence RI: 10 Prime  http://www.tenprimesteakandsushi.com/
San Diego: Donovan's  http://www.donovanssteakhouse.com/san-diego-gaslamp-steakhouse.html
San Francisco: Alexander's  http://www.alexanderssteakhouse.com/sf_site/san_francisco_information . html
Charleston, SC: The Oak  http://www.oaksteakhouserestaurant.com/
Northern VA: Ray's the Steaks   http://www.raysthesteaks.com/

4.bp.blogspot.com

Caveat:  These are mostly special occasion places...I also like the sirloin at Outback just to get away sometimes and I enjoy grilling my own.
 
2013-09-17 03:14:58 PM  

bungle_jr: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly like the way they avoid lawsuits and complaints about food poisoning.


I'd be willing to sign a disclaimer.
 
2013-09-17 03:15:16 PM  

URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.


As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.
 
2013-09-17 03:16:13 PM  
pute kisses like a man: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

it's perfectly possible that you can cook a good steak.

however, most people are terrible at cooking steaks. they molest it too much while it's on the grill.  they employ the retarded press down with the spatula method to destroy the steak.   They flip it too many times. they throw it on the grill before the grill is the right temperature, they don't let the steak come to temperature before cooking it, they overcook the steak, they cut into the steak to see if it's done, they poorly season it (which most likely includes overseasoning), and the worst of all, they serve it right from the grill without letting it rest.


i slashed thru the parts that really don't matter much. as for cutting into it to check doneness, i considered not slashing that one. i personally don't do it for steak, because i can tell (good enough for me and my family eating steak on a saturday afternoon) the doneness by other factors. however, for thick pieces of chicken or pork, i do not take any chances. i cut into the middle of the largest piece. if it's done, the rest is done.

ALWAYS let the steak rest, covered in foil! we usually are finishing up our sides while this takes place
 
2013-09-17 03:17:01 PM  
The trick that I was told about was that steaks are cooked in special ovens above 1000 degrees much like a pizza oven or under solid flame front devices called salamanders, neither of which come in standard home kitchens.  I then read about defeating the oven cleaner door interlock and getting your home oven to about the same temperature on the cleaning cycle while still being able to open the door.  It works well and produces a very nice steak with a crusty outside and a medium rare inside and are achievable with meat thermometer monitoring.  I have an exhaust fan in the kitchen and I use 2 cheap box fans in 2 windows one of which is blowing fresh air in and one is blowing smoke out. I also use a pan of water to prevent the drippings from the steak catching fire in the oven.

staff.washington.edu

Don't blame me if the fire department decides to drop by to share  some of your  ribeye.
 
2013-09-17 03:17:41 PM  
Mid_mo_mad_man:  well done is hated. I was at a famous KC steakhouse and they had it mentioned point blank on menu no well done steaks will be served.

It is known.
 
2013-09-17 03:19:43 PM  

tricycleracer: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.

As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.


I frequent a local bar that has really, really excellent hamburgers and steak sandwiches.
Being a loser, I'll sit there all day drinking, from time to time.
The number of people who order well and very well done meat is astonishing.
 
2013-09-17 03:19:46 PM  

URAPNIS: bungle_jr: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly like the way they avoid lawsuits and complaints about food poisoning.

I'd be willing to sign a disclaimer.


i completely understand
businesses sometimes have been burned on such issues, though, and find it's better to not risk it
 
2013-09-17 03:20:56 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Space Station Wagon

I have not had the waygu


How about the wagyu? Have you had that?


No but it's on my list.
(do typing mistakes ever cease to be hilarious?)
 
2013-09-17 03:21:52 PM  
Good news for you rare burger fans.  The Camellia Grill in New Orleans still serves the "Cannibal".
www.roadfood.com
/as you see, be prepared to stand in line
 
2013-09-17 03:21:56 PM  

bungle_jr: URAPNIS: bungle_jr: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly like the way they avoid lawsuits and complaints about food poisoning.

I'd be willing to sign a disclaimer.

i completely understand
businesses sometimes have been burned on such issues, though, and find it's better to not risk it


I know, I'm just tussling your hair.
 
2013-09-17 03:25:19 PM  

scarmig: Waffle House.  Pan-fry that shiat in bacon grease and Pam.  Add Tabasco and an egg.


Waffle House uses some synthetic high-mileage yellow oil called "Flav-o-fry" not bacon grease. And they took their best "meat" selection - chop steak - off of their menu!!!

/shakes tiny fork !!!
 
2013-09-17 03:27:44 PM  

URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.

As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.

I frequent a local bar that has really, really excellent hamburgers and steak sandwiches.
Being a loser, I'll sit there all day drinking, from time to time.
The number of people who order well and very well done meat is astonishing.




I like a rare steak but can't stand any pink in my burger. I know that's odd but that's true. Same with eggs and no runny yolks.
 
2013-09-17 03:28:41 PM  

MBooda: Good news for you rare burger fans.  The Camellia Grill in New Orleans still serves the "Cannibal".
[www.roadfood.com image 850x669]
/as you see, be prepared to stand in line


ACK! The Grill!!! Weekly trip there for the stew. Good memories came flashing back...
 
2013-09-17 03:29:13 PM  
Meh. I cook steak on my flat-top griller thingie (on my porch, because there is tons of smoke). Sear both sides until it's cooked adequately (not blackened). It's farking delicious. Better than most restaurants, IMHO. Just a little salt and pepper. Leave it out for awhile first so it warms up a little. Let it rest for 5 minutes or so before I eat it. It's not rocket surgery.
 
2013-09-17 03:29:23 PM  

itsaidwhat: scarmig: Waffle House.  Pan-fry that shiat in bacon grease and Pam.  Add Tabasco and an egg.

Waffle House uses some synthetic high-mileage yellow oil called "Flav-o-fry" not bacon grease. And they took their best "meat" selection - chop steak - off of their menu!!!

/shakes tiny fork !!!


recovering wafflehouseaholic here...they took chop steak off the menu?

seriously, wtf?!?

i rarely got it, but i did enjoy it when i got chop steak and eggs.

/always amaze (or annoy) folks who go with me to wh...i know the lingo...most of it anyway
//was in the airforce reserves with a guy whose wife was a wh waitress
 
2013-09-17 03:29:27 PM  

MBooda: Good news for you rare burger fans.  The Camellia Grill in New Orleans still serves the "Cannibal".
[www.roadfood.com image 850x669]
/as you see, be prepared to stand in line


wait... what?

they told me the took the Cannibal off the menu after that chef killed his girlfriend and ate her, just before jumping off the roof of some hotel.

/ the chef was not a camelia grill chef.  but, camelia grill thought it would be tasteless to keep a cannibal item on the menu after a very famous incident of local cannibalism.
 
2013-09-17 03:30:17 PM  

jfivealive: Space Station Wagon: revrendjim: No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).

28 day dry aged waygu and it's still half the price of a prime steak at a steakhouse.
http://fairwaypacking.com/

Now you know someone

Ordering meat over the internet makes me a bit nervous, have you had them before?


Makes me think of Solyent Green.
 
2013-09-17 03:33:53 PM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.

As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.

I frequent a local bar that has really, really excellent hamburgers and steak sandwiches.
Being a loser, I'll sit there all day drinking, from time to time.
The number of people who order well and very well done meat is astonishing.

I like a rare steak but can't stand any pink in my burger. I know that's odd but that's true. Same with eggs and no runny yolks.


2 reasons i don't like pink in the burger.

1 - questionable meat quality. unless i know that burger meat was a quality piece of steak until getting ground up a minute before hitting the grill/griddle/pan, then i don't know its quality. cook it till whatever is in it dies!

2 - texture. the texture of a rare sirloin is divine. the texture of pink ground beef is slimy mush. cook it till it's firm!

i love runny-yolk eggs, though. it's runny whites i can do without
 
2013-09-17 03:36:14 PM  

bungle_jr: Mid_mo_mad_man: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.

As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.

I frequent a local bar that has really, really excellent hamburgers and steak sandwiches.
Being a loser, I'll sit there all day drinking, from time to time.
The number of people who order well and very well done meat is astonishing.

I like a rare steak but can't stand any pink in my burger. I know that's odd but that's true. Same with eggs and no runny yolks.

2 reasons i don't like pink in the burger.

1 - questionable meat quality. unless i know that burger meat was a quality piece of steak until getting ground up a minute before hitting the grill/griddle/pan, then i don't know its quality. cook it till whatever is in it dies!

2 - texture. the texture of a rare sirloin is divine. the texture of pink ground beef is slimy mush. cook it till it's firm!

i love runny-yolk eggs, though. it's runny whites i can do without


oh...combine runny yolk and a burger patty (on or off the bun, doesn't really matter to me)...nice!
 
2013-09-17 03:36:35 PM  

Space Station Wagon


(do typing mistakes ever cease to be hilarious?)


They haven't yet, but I'm pretty easily amused. :-)
 
2013-09-17 03:37:33 PM  

GRCooper: Uranus Is Huge!: Yeah, well, can you bring me some ketchup. Mmm. Mmm. Nothin' sets off the flavor of a steak like some ketchup.

Well done.

I'm of the opinion that you're allowed to like what you like.

I, however, do not like what you like.


I guess that line is more obscure than I thought.
 
2013-09-17 03:38:00 PM  
steak + skillet

or

roast + grill

and done!

no need to spend double, triple the price in a restaurant
 
2013-09-17 03:41:39 PM  

tricycleracer: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.

As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.


You guys are ridiculous.  Hamburger is terrible quality meat from potentiality hundreds of cows. Why would you risk contracting a disease for a tiny increase in softness in texture and a miniscule change in taste?

Eating Steak rare is one thing.... hamburger is just plain dumb.
 
2013-09-17 03:43:06 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: GRCooper: Uranus Is Huge!: Yeah, well, can you bring me some ketchup. Mmm. Mmm. Nothin' sets off the flavor of a steak like some ketchup.

Well done.

I'm of the opinion that you're allowed to like what you like.

I, however, do not like what you like.

I guess that line is more obscure than I thought.


Crap. No.

My waitron friends would mock me mercilessly for missing that one
 
2013-09-17 03:43:54 PM  

oldfarthenry: Steak connoisseurs on Fark? Big surprise.

What wine goes best with bloviating spittle?


2008 or 2009 Rioja.  I'd go with Marques de Riscal Reserva.

\\ assuming you are making the spittle
\ if you are drinking the spittle, the I'd have to go with an 07
 
2013-09-17 03:46:38 PM  
Even though I don't mind spending some money on the good stuff from time to time.
I normally buy from the local butcher or Costco if they have a good deal and i will eat at Brann's occasionally  http://www.branns.com/index.cfm

bungle_jr: oh...combine runny yolk and a burger patty (on or off the bun, doesn't really matter to me)...nice!

and a couple slices of crispy bacon and a drizzle of zip sauce.
 
2013-09-17 03:48:07 PM  

Space Station Wagon: Even though I don't mind spending some money on the good stuff from time to time.
I normally buy from the local butcher or Costco if they have a good deal and i will eat at Brann's occasionally  http://www.branns.com/index.cfm

bungle_jr: oh...combine runny yolk and a burger patty (on or off the bun, doesn't really matter to me)...nice!
and a couple slices of crispy bacon and a drizzle of zip sauce.


i don't know what zip sauce is, but i'm now very hungry!
 
2013-09-17 03:49:04 PM  

huntercr: You guys are ridiculous.  Hamburger is terrible quality meat from potentiality hundreds of cows. Why would you risk contracting a disease for a tiny increase in softness in texture and a miniscule change in taste?


This really.  Most pre-ground burger meat is low grade crap they can't sell as steak, and the risks of contamination in an industrial meat grinder using beef from multiple sources (not just multiple cows either, look on some packages of groud beef "Product of USA, Canada,AND Argentina") is just way too high.

Now, if you happen to have a meat grinder and are willing to grind your own sirloin or chuck...  that's a different story.

/the wife has been known to sing bits of Sweeney Todd while making meatloaf mix
 
2013-09-17 03:49:42 PM  
My grandfather came from a Texas cattle ranch, way back in the day, before all that fancy stuff such as electricity and vaccines.  He took his steak well-done, always, his whole life.  Because that way the diseases and parasites the cattle carried wouldn't kill his family.

Be thankful for modern medicine and your rare steak.
 
2013-09-17 03:52:03 PM  

revrendjim: hey have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


our Costco sells prime beef. and it's awesome.
 
2013-09-17 03:53:21 PM  

bungle_jr: pute kisses like a man: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

it's perfectly possible that you can cook a good steak.

however, most people are terrible at cooking steaks. they molest it too much while it's on the grill.  they employ the retarded press down with the spatula method to destroy the steak.   They flip it too many times. they throw it on the grill before the grill is the right temperature, they don't let the steak come to temperature before cooking it, they overcook the steak, they cut into the steak to see if it's done, they poorly season it (which most likely includes overseasoning), and the worst of all, they serve it right from the grill without letting it rest.


i slashed thru the parts that really don't matter much. as for cutting into it to check doneness, i considered not slashing that one. i personally don't do it for steak, because i can tell (good enough for me and my family eating steak on a saturday afternoon) the doneness by other factors. however, for thick pieces of chicken or pork, i do not take any chances. i cut into the middle of the largest piece. if it's done, the rest is done.

ALWAYS let the steak rest, covered in foil! we usually are finishing up our sides while this takes place


grilling a steak is about one thing: keeping the meat tender.  this is done by keeping the juices inside the steak.

flipping too much is just an example of molesting it while it's cooking.  each time you flip it, the steak takes pressure and loses juices.  basically, touch the meat as little as possible, every time you touch it you are throwing away flavor and tenderness.

cutting into the steak while it's cooking is murder.  it is the worst thing you can do.  you can use a feel test for steaks (judge the softness of the steak versus the flesh between your thumb and finger in a loss fist).  if you really have to check a meat's doneness, use a thermometer.  this is much less damaging than cutting in halfway to see if it's done.

finally, unless you are cooking hamburgers (which are best cold and then straight on the grill, oh yeah, and divet the center of you burgers, as it heats, the meat contracts to the center and creates a perfectly flat burger that will cook evenly, otherwise you're going to end up with a meatball looking burger that's done on the outside and raw in the middle - a common grilling mistake, and a necessity for a good rare burger), bring all meats up to room temperature before cooking.

throwing a cold piece of meat onto a hot grill is very violent for the meat.  First off, it will cause the meat to contract much more than if it were at room temperature, which means losing juice and flavor.  further, it will upset the heating process and cause uneven cooking.  finally, it can have an effect on the initial sear, which is key in order to get the outer layer of the meat to seal in the juices, and make for easy grill removal.

/ as an aside, if pools of blood come out when you cut into it, you did not let it rest.  as you will notice, cutting into raw steak does not release pools of blood.  it is not a sign that it was cooked rare, it is a sign that you ruined your steak.
 
2013-09-17 03:53:43 PM  
Best of both worlds. You get all the great ambiance, very tasty sides and really good quality cuts. You pick the steak you want, and you can grill it yourself, or pay a couple bucks extra to have them do it. It's pretty cool talking with people around the grill pits and you know exactly what you are doing to the meat.

/about due for a visit.
 
2013-09-17 03:55:50 PM  

bungle_jr: oh...combine runny yolk and a burger patty (on or off the bun, doesn't really matter to me)...nice!


www.foodsmackdown.com

Slaters 50/50 beef and bacon with egg and guacamole
 
2013-09-17 03:56:42 PM  

bungle_jr: i don't know what zip sauce is, but i'm now very hungry!


Wow I just found out it is a Michigan thing, mainly Detroit. I always figured it was an everywhere thing. You learn something new everyday.


scarmig: Be thankful for modern medicine and your rare steak.

Agreed, for the amount of food we eat and the fairly low numbers of people who get sick it appears the USDA is doing a pretty good job.
 
2013-09-17 03:57:46 PM  

bungle_jr: as for cutting into it to check doneness, i considered not slashing that one. i personally don't do it for steak, because i can tell (good enough for me and my family eating steak on a saturday afternoon) the doneness by other factors. however, for thick pieces of chicken or pork, i do not take any chances. i cut into the middle of the largest piece. if it's done, the rest is done.
ALWAYS let the steak rest, covered in foil! we usually are finishing up our sides while this takes place



If you can judge steak without cutting into it, you can do the same for chicken and pork.  Learn the finger doneness technique.  It works.
http://primecutsblog.com/2008/12/01/the-finger-test-to-check-the-don en ess-of-steak/

Learn it for steak, and it will work for chicken and pork too.

Frankly people worry too much about whether pork is "done enough".  Medium pork is wonderful. Trichinosis is a thing of the past.  Just buy meat from butcher you can trust.
 
2013-09-17 04:01:18 PM  

pute kisses like a man: bungle_jr: pute kisses like a man: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

it's perfectly possible that you can cook a good steak.

however, most people are terrible at cooking steaks. they molest it too much while it's on the grill.  they employ the retarded press down with the spatula method to destroy the steak.   They flip it too many times. they throw it on the grill before the grill is the right temperature, they don't let the steak come to temperature before cooking it, they overcook the steak, they cut into the steak to see if it's done, they poorly season it (which most likely includes overseasoning), and the worst of all, they serve it right from the grill without letting it rest.


i slashed thru the parts that really don't matter much. as for cutting into it to check doneness, i considered not slashing that one. i personally don't do it for steak, because i can tell (good enough for me and my family eating steak on a saturday afternoon) the doneness by other factors. however, for thick pieces of chicken or pork, i do not take any chances. i cut into the middle of the largest piece. if it's done, the rest is done.

ALWAYS let the steak rest, covered in foil! we usually are finishing up our sides while this takes place

grilling a steak is about one thing: keeping the meat tender.  this is done by keeping the juices inside the steak.

flipping too much is just an example of molesting it while it's cooking.  each time you flip it, the steak takes pressure and loses juices.  basically, touch the meat as little as possible, every time you touch it you are throwing away flavor and tenderness.

cutting into the steak while it's cooking is murder.  it is the worst thing you can do.  you can use a feel test for steaks (judge the softness of the steak versus the flesh between your thumb and finger in a loss fist).  if you really have to check a meat's doneness, use a thermometer.  this is much less damaging than cutting in ...


I think most of your concerns were addressed upthread when someone posted this...   http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/the-food-lab-7-old-wives-tales-abo u t-cooking-steak.html
 
2013-09-17 04:04:33 PM  

ipxodi: bungle_jr: as for cutting into it to check doneness, i considered not slashing that one. i personally don't do it for steak, because i can tell (good enough for me and my family eating steak on a saturday afternoon) the doneness by other factors. however, for thick pieces of chicken or pork, i do not take any chances. i cut into the middle of the largest piece. if it's done, the rest is done.
ALWAYS let the steak rest, covered in foil! we usually are finishing up our sides while this takes place


If you can judge steak without cutting into it, you can do the same for chicken and pork.  Learn the finger doneness technique.  It works.
http://primecutsblog.com/2008/12/01/the-finger-test-to-check-the-don en ess-of-steak/

Learn it for steak, and it will work for chicken and pork too.

Frankly people worry too much about whether pork is "done enough".  Medium pork is wonderful. Trichinosis is a thing of the past.  Just buy meat from butcher you can trust.


http://www.healthline.com/health-news/children-avoid-these-meats-to- st eer-clear-of-food-poisoning-042313
 
2013-09-17 04:05:27 PM  

Well I use Mac/Linux...: /I like a little Montreal steak seasoning


this is simply the best.
 
2013-09-17 04:13:27 PM  
pute kisses like a man: 
flipping too much is just an example of molesting it while it's cooking.  each time you flip it, the steak takes pressure and loses juices.  basically, touch the meat as little as possible, every time you touch it you are throwing away flavor and tenderness.


Do NOT watch the Gordon Ramsay video from an earlier post.  You'd be calling the cops.
 
2013-09-17 04:14:47 PM  

huntercr: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: tricycleracer: URAPNIS: Went to a Roadhouse or some such place a few months ago for lunch.
Ordered a burger, medium rare.
Waitress says they can only cook medium or more.
I told her I wanted medium with lots of pink in the middle.
Seems silly.

This local burger joint told me medium-well and above only.  I finished my drink, left, and won't return.

She gave me a wink and the burger was fine.
Good on you for leaving.
They don't deserve your business.

As a counter point, if you order over medium-rare at this place, the owner will laugh at you.

You guys are ridiculous.  Hamburger is terrible quality meat from potentiality hundreds of cows. Why would you risk contracting a disease for a tiny increase in softness in texture and a miniscule change in taste?

Eating Steak rare is one thing.... hamburger is just plain dumb.


The place I mention grinds sirloin in house fresh daily, so I'll go ahead and keep being dumb.

/I'd never order mid-rare at a chain.
 
2013-09-17 04:18:53 PM  

KeelingLovesCornholes: Local butcher (Critchfield's) never steers me wrong. Every town should have one, and a good bakery.


Critchfield's is wonderful. It's my go to place when I want ANY kind of meat. So good. Their lunches are good, too.
 
2013-09-17 04:22:00 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: GRCooper: Uranus Is Huge!: Yeah, well, can you bring me some ketchup. Mmm. Mmm. Nothin' sets off the flavor of a steak like some ketchup.

Well done.

I'm of the opinion that you're allowed to like what you like.

I, however, do not like what you like.

I guess that line is more obscure than I thought.


Nope, not to this guy!

i1.ytimg.com
 
2013-09-17 04:24:58 PM  

revrendjim: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


That is 100% not true.  Maybe you have to go to a store that doesn't also sell toilet paper and Cheerios.  But it's really not that hard to find the same cuts of meat for reasonable prices.
 
2013-09-17 04:27:12 PM  

wee: johnny_vegas: so you are mass producing a product to the tune of "hundreds a week" and wee can focus on just making his steak for himself and he knows exactly how he likes it and has a repeatable proven method he enjoys. Why should it be a surprise or a perceived jab at your culinary chops that he is better able to satisfy himself

Hell, I know I could never hack it in a commercial kitchen.  But I also know that being a science nerd I need to figure out how to cook something just the way I like it.  So I built this: http://i.imgur.com/RY7BqXD.jpg  And now I can experiment with eggs, and scallops and asparagus and whatever.  It's fun, and if I wind up turning some awesome $14.99/pound strips into steaks exactly how I like them, all the better! :-) Cheaper than going out, anyway.

I also make my own bacon, pastrami, sausages, mustard, sauerkraut, pickles, kimchee, and a bunch of other things I could buy commercially but which aren't nearly quite as good as what I can produce.  Doesn't mean any chef type guys should take offense just because I have science projects all over my kitchen counter...


Hey, wee, got some plans to build that crockpot sous vide? I've been doing steaks in the super cheap style of hot tap water in an ice chest. It works good for steaks, but you have to monitor and add hot water every once in a while. That becomes a minor pain. If I got that temp controller, I'd branch out into other things to cooks with the sous vide method. Also, wouldn't mind some pointers on a good kimchee recipe. I've not eaten any since I was stationed at Camp Red Cloud S. Korea. I'd like to give it a try since I've got the sauerkraut down.
 
2013-09-17 04:28:52 PM  
Darn it!  I just bought three little lamb t-bones an hour ago. (he says they suck in #7)

/at least I didn't pay $50
 
2013-09-17 04:44:23 PM  

drxym: Can't say I've suffered anything like these problems but I have felt cheated in a few.

The biggest ripoff I've suffered was a place called Lawry's Prime Rib in Chicago. Not steak but roast beef. The waiter was selling up on absolutely everything - "Can I have the rib?", "would you like surf and turf its the special tonight and blah blah blah", "no just the rib", "would you like the house special salad which is blah blah blah", "can I have the house white", "would you like to try this chablis (which happens to be 4x more) which we have in stock blah blah" and so on. On every damned choice. Waiter even had the gall to stick a "it is customary to tip 15%" card on the table.  I've never felt so used and the food was very mediocre.


I think I would have turned that card over and written, "It is customary not to tip salesmen."
 
2013-09-17 04:44:41 PM  
doesn't really matter

i don't go to "Sit-Down" because it is something i cant make (i most cases, i can cook better food then you will ever get at 99% of place) it is because

A: i don't feel like spending all day Prepping for dinner
B: a lot of things are not practical too cook at home unless you have a LARGE family, or want to eat the same thing all week
C: I don't have to do the clean up, when i go out to eat

///Now, if i could ever get my own Salamander, and Meat Slicer...then some fun could be had
 
2013-09-17 04:45:06 PM  
When you order braised short ribs, all you're paying for is the time it didn't take you to make them at home.
 
2013-09-17 04:47:49 PM  
Get a Thermapen. Learn how to use it.
 
2013-09-17 04:56:13 PM  
Ruth's Chris is awful.  I don't know how anyone eats that slopped in butter burned to a crisp on the outside raw in the middle trash.  I actually feel bad for people who eat there.  The price is just adding insult to injury.

Most other mid/chain restaurants are just as bad.  I don't ever order it even though I am a fiend because the price-quality ratio is a complete letdown.  I can get a 3lb Filet for ~30$ , dress it and sous vide it to perfection. No f'ing way I am paying 50$ at Ruth's for a 9ounce black/raw hunk of beef.

There are some good steak houses that can/do make stuff better than a grill pro but they're usually cost prohibitive.
 
2013-09-17 05:02:25 PM  

revrendjim: sigdiamond2000: #1: Making you think they can cook a better steak than you can.

No, they can get better steaks than you can. They have first pick of the best USDA Prime cuts, and you and I can't buy those (unless you know someone).


There are these nifty places called butcher shops. You tell them what you want and then you get it. You can buy a whole New York Strip and have it cut to thickness for usually zereo to minimal charge. Or you can find a local farmer and get half a beef for a few hundred bucks.
or do what I did and marry a farm girl. My FIL raises cattle in OK but is too cheap to feed them corn, so they're amazing. And we get a quarter of a cow, in our choice of cuts, for Christmas every year.
 
2013-09-17 05:03:39 PM  

tricycleracer: When you order braised short ribs, all you're paying for is the time it didn't take you to make them at home.


Ok ok I'll get off your lawn.
 
2013-09-17 05:04:06 PM  
I'll pistol whip the next person who says "sous vide".
 
2013-09-17 05:05:03 PM  

huntercr: Hamburger is terrible quality meat from potentiality hundreds of cows.


Costco is the exception to this, they don't mix cows in their beef.  Apparently it drives their suppliers crazy.
 
2013-09-17 05:07:17 PM  
I have not eaten an "expensive meal" out in several years, I make it at home and it tastes so much better.
 
2013-09-17 05:11:26 PM  
Illustrated guide to perfect steak... first get a prime rib eye:  $15+
a248.e.akamai.net
Add spices like salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder... a little paprika makes a nice color... not enough to change the flavor.   ($10 but you already have this)

4.bp.blogspot.com


Fill a small cooler with hot water:  ($20 but you already have this)
i.walmartimages.com

Test the temp with a digital instant read thermometer:  ($8 at the supermarket or Target)
img1.targetimg1.com
If the temp is more than 132, add cold water to bring it down to between 131 and 132.  If it is less than 131 then add hot water to bring it up, but not over 132.  This is the hardest part of the process.


Put the steak in a ziplok bag... one steak per bag.  ($3 but you already have this)
www.vitacost.com

Close the half way and then put the bag mostly into the water such that the steak is submerged but the top of the bag is above the water.  The water forces all the air out of the bag and then close the bag the rest of the way so it is water tight with no air.

Wait at least one hour, longer if it is a really thick steak.  YOU CANNOT OVER-COOK THE STEAK BUT YOU CAN UNDER-COOK IT.
www.drmenlo.com

While you are waiting, prepare the remainder of the meal or get roaring drunk.  Your choice.

When you take the steak out of the bag it will have an unappealing grey color.  Don't worry.

Put steak on a cold grill or a similar fire-proof place:
www.momgoesgreen.com


Fire up the MAPP gas torch.   $8 Home Depot
www.finehomebuilding.com

Sear that steak with the 3000 degree flame!  Be sure to hit the sides all the way around...  Then flip it over and do the other side.

Put it on the plate and optionally rub a little pat of butter all over it:
kindawonderful.typepad.com

Serve and enjoy a steak that is evenly cooked medium rare all the way through instead of well on the outside and rare on the inside.  The fact that can get rip roaring drunk before using a gas torch but STILL NOT BURN THE STEAK makes this the best recipe evar!
 
2013-09-17 05:14:07 PM  

Datanerd: huntercr: Hamburger is terrible quality meat from potentiality hundreds of cows.

Costco is the exception to this, they don't mix cows in their beef.  Apparently it drives their suppliers crazy.


Oh drat, they're buying trimmings too.  But they're also testing for E. Coli.
 
2013-09-17 05:15:45 PM  

hubiestubert: Oddly enough, considering that I tend to cook steaks forty or fifty times a night, yeah, I DO think that. Because I have a lot more practice at it.


Then why can't you cook it the way I order it?  Huh??
(No nevermind... nobody ever cooks it how I order it.  I think it might be illegal.)
 
2013-09-17 05:18:51 PM  

ski9600: Darn it!  I just bought three little lamb t-bones an hour ago. (he says they suck in #7)

/at least I didn't pay $50


They suck when you burn them. Don't burn them.

For next time the rib chops for the win.  The best taste/cost ratio is a cut occasionally called an arm chop.  Get the ones with the rib bones on the tail.

/mmmmm lamb
 
2013-09-17 05:22:51 PM  

tricycleracer: I'll pistol whip the next person who says "sous vide".



www.protias.com
 
2013-09-17 05:27:23 PM  

wee: hubiestubert:
I've only had a steak better than what I can make at one place: http://www.alexanderssteakhouse.com/


OMFG, that looks expensive and great!www.alexanderssteakhouse.com
 
2013-09-17 05:40:45 PM  

TheWhoppah: Illustrated guide to perfect steak... first get a prime rib eye:  $15+
[a248.e.akamai.net image 600x450]
Add spices like salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder... a little paprika makes a nice color... not enough to change the flavor.   ($10 but you already have this)

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 320x214]


Fill a small cooler with hot water:  ($20 but you already have this)
[i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]

Test the temp with a digital instant read thermometer:  ($8 at the supermarket or Target)
[img1.targetimg1.com image 410x410]
If the temp is more than 132, add cold water to bring it down to between 131 and 132.  If it is less than 131 then add hot water to bring it up, but not over 132.  This is the hardest part of the process.


Put the steak in a ziplok bag... one steak per bag.  ($3 but you already have this)
[www.vitacost.com image 850x279]

Close the half way and then put the bag mostly into the water such that the steak is submerged but the top of the bag is above the water.  The water forces all the air out of the bag and then close the bag the rest of the way so it is water tight with no air.

Wait at least one hour, longer if it is a really thick steak.  YOU CANNOT OVER-COOK THE STEAK BUT YOU CAN UNDER-COOK IT.
[www.drmenlo.com image 375x331]

While you are waiting, prepare the remainder of the meal or get roaring drunk.  Your choice.

When you take the steak out of the bag it will have an unappealing grey color.  Don't worry.

Put steak on a cold grill or a similar fire-proof place:
[www.momgoesgreen.com image 360x360]


Fire up the MAPP gas torch.   $8 Home Depot
[www.finehomebuilding.com image 300x325]

Sear that steak with the 3000 degree flame!  Be sure to hit the sides all the way around...  Then flip it over and do the other side.

Put it on the plate and optionally rub a little pat of butter all over it:
[kindawonderful.typepad.com image 350x269]

Serve and enjoy a steak that is evenly cooked medium rare all the way through instead of well o ...


Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat
 
2013-09-17 05:44:16 PM  

groppet: My friends know some meat people. So when I go visit my folks they always load me up with whatever they have overflowing from the freezer. I get to see them this weekend hmmmmmm.


mmmmmmm, meat people.
 
2013-09-17 05:47:41 PM  

thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat


FTFY

/Why waste seasoning on your paper towels?
//Season the steak AFTER it comes to temp - the salt needs time to work on the meat, but the spices are better if you apply them just before hitting the heat
///While I enjoy grilling, and cook outside pretty much every day I can, the best steak I ever made was with the rocket-hot-cast-iron method.
 
2013-09-17 05:50:38 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: PanicMan: cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...

Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.

You should go.  They use suet (lard leaf) with butter to drizzle on the steaks.  Whatever this guy says, they're outstanding.  The bacon thing is a ripoff, but to my knowledge no one has ever ordered the bacon at Peter Luger.  You get the tomato and onion with steak sauce appetizer and the steak.  Maybe a side or two if you're extra hungry.


The bacon is good. Not because its special bacon, but because it's grilled bacon. A great warmup for steak.

I had mediocre steak the last time I was there, but what can you expect with a large party of clearly inebriated men, obviously from out of town?
 
2013-09-17 05:51:00 PM  
thenunmber5:

Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat


My apartment is filling up with smoke!  What should I do now?
 
2013-09-17 05:51:54 PM  
Just my .02 bucks. Best tasting, most consistent steak I've experienced was from a local Italian restaurant called Jimmys. 16oz ribeye, never frozen, with a garlic butter marinade. Inch thick at the table, and in 10 years, maybe 30 - 40 visits, nary a scrap left. The last one was 3 weeks before the place burned out and the check was $38 for the wife and I. One of our last nights on the town it turned out.

/wish they could have found restart money
//huge *sigh*
///slashies!
 
2013-09-17 05:52:38 PM  

thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat


No, that is the second-best way to do it.  If you get rip-roaring drunk while doing it that way then there is a good chance your steak will come out medium... or worse!   The cooler method is better because you don't have to watch the time and you can't screw it up no matter how much you drink.
 
2013-09-17 05:55:22 PM  

IRQ12: thenunmber5:

Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

My apartment is filling up with smoke!  What should I do now?


breath deep
 
2013-09-17 05:59:23 PM  

praxcelis: thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

FTFY

/Why waste seasoning on your paper towels?
//Season the steak AFTER it comes to temp - the salt needs time to work on the meat, but the spices are better if you apply them just before hitting the heat
///While I enjoy grilling, and cook outside pretty much every day I can, the best steak I ever made was with the rocket-hot-cast-iron method.


i use seasoning rubs,Some does get on the towels. but also lets a seasoning get in to the meat and not just sit on the outside
 
2013-09-17 06:01:06 PM  

TheWhoppah: thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

No, that is the second-best way to do it.  If you get rip-roaring drunk while doing it that way then there is a good chance your steak will come out medium... or worse!   The cooler method is better because you don't have to watch the time and you can't screw it up no matter how much you drink.


This is true, also when you have a rissotto on or other fickle food it's nice to not have to fuss with all that.

Also, it is VERY hard for an amateur to cook a thick cut tbone (and other like filet) mid-rare end to end.  Sous vide makes it childs play.  I like to barbecue too but when I want perfection I Sous vide.
 
wee
2013-09-17 06:09:32 PM  

johnny_vegas: Alton Brown?


I lean more Harold McGee and Michael Ruhlman.

Cortez the Killer: Hey, wee, got some plans to build that crockpot sous vide? I've been doing steaks in the super cheap style of hot tap water in an ice chest. It works good for steaks, but you have to monitor and add hot water every once in a while. That becomes a minor pain. If I got that temp controller, I'd branch out into other things to cooks with the sous vide method. Also, wouldn't mind some pointers on a good kimchee recipe. I've not eaten any since I was stationed at Camp Red Cloud S. Korea. I'd like to give it a try since I've got the sauerkraut down.


You want one of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008KVCPH2 and also one of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000KKLONM and one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Cantex-Industries-Junction-5133709U-Fittings/dp / B000NCUVZE
Next get a single outlet socket from Home Depot or the hardware store (or amazon, I guess).

It's very easy to wire up.  Here's one diagram: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/gallery/data/500/medium/STC-1000_outlet_w i ring.jpg; That powers both the heating and cooling relays.  My unit only does heating since I'm not brewing beer or curing ham or whatever.

I cut about 2 feet off the extension cord, strip it, and use those wires internally.   Also leaves you with a near 6' cord for your controller. You'll need a couple wirenuts, too.

Wire it all up, then test it with a cold beer and a light.  Once you know it's all good, use a dremel to cut the holes in the box's lid, then drill holes in the box sides for the power and sensor wires.  Install the controller, re-attach all the wires, install the socket, screw it down, attach the lid, test it again.  Should take about 45-60 minutes.  One tip: use zip ties inside the box as strain relief for the wires.

As far as kimchi, here's the stuff you want: http://www.amazon.com/Singsong-Korean-Pepper-Powder-1-10/dp/B004W71CJ U /

Slice up Napa cabbage however leafy/thin you want it. Slice up daikon radish, in whatever shapes you like (I go thin strips). Do the same with carrot, then thinly dice whatever quantity of garlic you like.  Pack the cabbage in layers into your crock like with kraut, but in between each layer where you'd just add salt, also throw in some pepper and some amount of the radish/carrot/garlic.  Continue with the next layer.  Top off with a standard brine (1/4 cup salt in one quart water) when done if need be.

For my 7.5 liter crock I used about half a cup of the hot pepper powder on my last bacth. I will likely go spicier next batch.

I know most recipes say to soak the cabbage leaves in salty water and then cut/pack them, but I treat them just like kraut and it works fine.  My "kraut-chi" might offend a Korean grandma, but they aren't thick on the ground in my area. :-)

ski9600: OMFG, that looks expensive and great!


Every steak I've had there is good.  But the ones the Japanese fellows brought for him to play round with were beyond outstanding.  And worth $325.  It was like eating beef-flavored heaven...
 
wee
2013-09-17 06:13:09 PM  

IRQ12: Sous vide makes it childs play. I like to barbecue too but when I want perfection I Sous vide.


It does.  Like I said, it's basically cheating.  I also like being able to put steaks on at home while on lunch break and then sear them off whenever everything else is ready.

Another benefit is the pan drippings.  You can't make a pan sauce from the stuff that drips onto coals and hisses.
 
2013-09-17 06:14:51 PM  

tricycleracer: I'll pistol whip the next person who says "sous vide verde".


/pet peave.
 
2013-09-17 06:17:47 PM  

wee: j...


What actually goes in the crockpot?
 
2013-09-17 06:52:33 PM  

wee: IRQ12: Sous vide makes it childs play. I like to barbecue too but when I want perfection I Sous vide.

It does.  Like I said, it's basically cheating.  I also like being able to put steaks on at home while on lunch break and then sear them off whenever everything else is ready.

Another benefit is the pan drippings.  You can't make a pan sauce from the stuff that drips onto coals and hisses.


In that list above where is the element that goes in the water?
 
wee
2013-09-17 06:54:49 PM  

IRQ12: What actually goes in the crockpot?


You vacuum-seal whatever it is that you want to cook and place the bags in the water.  You can get by using ziplocs, but it's not quite the same since you don't have that close contact with the water.
 
wee
2013-09-17 06:56:32 PM  

IRQ12: In that list above where is the element that goes in the water?


You don't need one.  The outlet on the controller turns crock pot on and off. So you plug the crockpot in, turn it on high, fill it with hot water, insert the probe and come back when the water is exactly how hot you need it.
 
2013-09-17 07:07:35 PM  
Ahhhhhhh.  So there is what kind of temperature variance do you see?
 
2013-09-17 07:10:01 PM  
The problem with cooking steaks is the heat factor. Unfortunately most sub $500 grill that most individuals own can't get the temp up to the 450-500 range in a consistent manner.
 
2013-09-17 07:26:50 PM  

OscarTamerz: The trick that I was told about was that steaks are cooked in special ovens above 1000 degrees much like a pizza oven or under solid flame front devices called salamanders


thenumber5: ///Now, if i could ever get my own Salamander,


While not technically a Salamander, there are home ranges with the type of infrared ceramic brick type broiler that are typically in salamanders. I've got a Blue Star range at home with an 1850 degree broiler, which is the same as in their actual salamander. It does make for a steak with a perfect sear and a perfect rare/medium rare with no transition. I have good technique for cooking steaks on the grill, but the super broiler unquestionably gives me better and more consistent results.
 
wee
2013-09-17 07:59:45 PM  

IRQ12: Ahhhhhhh.  So there is what kind of temperature variance do you see?


Once the ceramic bowl of the crock pot gets warm it take maybe 30 minutes to keep the temp consistent.  If you drop a couple steaks in, the temp goes down maybe 8-10 degrees C, then up a degree past your target, then back and forth until it's with half a degree at any given time. Of course, if you have a really cold kitchen then a towel over the top is called for.
 
2013-09-17 09:07:19 PM  

ElLoco: A couple of my tenants run cattle on the big corners or non-farmable areas of land. Sometimes I get lucky and get an entire cow full of 'unlabeled' usda prime. Usually, though, it is 'just way better than you can buy at the store' grade... which is good, but I'm not fooling myself into imagining it into prime beef. I hate buying beef at the grocery store and usually stick to the custom cutters when/if I buy it. My local guy does an awesome job with dry-aging and I'll have him do a 22-28 day age on the best loins when I have whole beeves or sides done in his shop.

Most of my hamburger comes from the grocery store, but with a kind of a twist. Many grocery stores around here put their cheapo steak cuts like select sirloin or ribeye on sale for at or less than the cost of decent hamburger meat. Most of the stores will custom grind hamburger over 10 pounds for free. So... I'll ask the meat market guy if he has any uncut sirloins or ribeyes in the back, have him weight it out at the sale price (and sometimes get a little additional price break since it isn't cut), and he pitches it in the grinder. Ground sirloin/ribeye for the same or less cost than the pre-packaged scrap meat hamburger.


I work in a meat dept ... ground chuck roast is the best bang for your buck and is very tasty
 
2013-09-17 09:23:57 PM  
Get a job with an expense account or hang around sales guys = Never pay for a restaurant meal again.
 
wee
2013-09-17 09:58:11 PM  

Macular Degenerate: hang around sales guys


Could be served $1000 steaks and it'd still not be worth it to have to deal with that level of annoyance...
 
2013-09-17 11:34:58 PM  

wee: hubiestubert: Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

Well for a home cook like me, it's basically cheating.  And I don't mind the time issue, since it actually helps.  Basically once everything else is nearly done, 120 seconds in a exceedingly hot cast iron skillet.  Rest it and it's ready (and I typically make a quick sauce while the meat is resting).  Now if i had to serve 60 per night like you, I don't know if it's all that feasible unless you have a giant machine. And then what do you do with meat that's been heated but not ordered?

I've only had a steak better than what I can make at one place: http://www.alexanderssteakhouse.com/  All the rest fall short in some way.  (Honestly, I think they fail to measure up because of the quality of beef. The ranch-raised stuff we get damn near tastes like elk, it's totally free-range and has a really meaty/earthy flavor.)


I will admit that perhaps I snapped a bit, and for that I apologize. I see a lot of hobby cooks who seem to think that their experience translates into line experience. Sous vide in a restaurant takes up a fair amount of space, and it requires that you seal your cuts up ahead of time, so that you can drop them in to order. Which takes up a lot of space for prep, a lot of space for storage, and cleaning, and I despise wasted space and time. Not when you have folks who have the skill to cook any dang piece of meat put before them to the proper temp, on command. It's a method that had a time and place, and it had some traction for a while, but most places realized that the time and space issues made it an unwieldy process, especially when they have folks with skills who can do equal or better just using their own instincts.

And that is really what it is about, on the professional level. You handle cuts long enough, you get a feel for each one's characteristics. From tenderloin, ribeye--and ribeyes can vary fair wildly depending on the beast it was carved from--to just simple 1x1 New Yorks. You judge by instinct, because you've cut the damn things yourself. You know the fat content, you know the texture, you know with a fair degree of certainty how they'll fare. And with marinade, without, on wood fired grill, in a wood fired oven, on gas, on coals, you get a feel for the equipment you work with. That translates to intimate knowledge on how each cut will fare.

I got spoiled when I was at the Deerfield Inn. Yazwinski Farms down the road raised all our beef, and they slaughtered them pretty much to order. We got amazing, grass fed beef, and we did a great deal of carved to order steaks--you want a 6oz, we cut a 6oz ribeye, or a 12oz, or a 24oz if that was your desire. We got brilliant sweetbreads, we were essentially in a culinary Disneyland whenever we got our beef order in. It made for a lot of fun experimentation, and consistently amazing product. Our chickens were local as well, along with the eggs, most of our cheeses were local, and we owned a farm share stake, for a load of produce that changed as the seasons came in. Our bacon was done in a local smokehouse, and was simply to die for. Seafood...I started every damn day with a cup of our chowder, so that I could look at our list, go over specials, notes, and take a quick inventory of what product we had just got in, and look over our catering schedule, and it never failed to put me in a good mood. We never got in the Ono that I constantly harped on to the Executive Chefs about, before Irene killed the place. 5 and half feet of water in the first floor, and that wiped out the Carriage House in the back, our downstairs produce walk in, our freezers, our meat coolers, and our downstairs prep and service kitchen for catering. Over $2M in damage total, and the restoration went apace, but by the time things were back online, the crew had scattered to the four winds, the Executive Chefs had flown the coop, and there was no way in 10,000 Hells I was going to go back and face the Innkeeper without their back up. HE wanted to do sous vide, and he got it with the new Exec, who just left, and took his entire crew after less than four months. Karl is a great guy to raise money, and a terrible man to work for directly...

Sous vide is a method for a home cook. It had a time and place in the industry, and it was a fun experiment, and some folks have made it into a signature, but from a professional perspective, it's a lot of time and space that could be better spent--and the one thing that professional kitchens never seem to have enough of is time and space. Even at the Inn, with a whole downstairs prep kitchen and catering space, we were constantly strapped for space to work and store crap. Even at Glenndale Arena, with a 16,000 seat arena, with a full on production kitchen, and satellite kitchens across the building, we were constantly fighting for space and equipment. And in fairness, that was only with about 16 full time chefs, sous, and line cooks. I did one of the clubs, and folks were amazed that for a spread for 350, it usually only took myself, the club lead for our sister club downstairs, my assistant, Shane's assistant, and the Executive Sous to prep for both clubs. Our building's garde manger, she had a crew of only three, to do apps and salads for all the suites as well as for the clubs. THAT was a nasty ass crew. I was positively brimming with staff, running both our building's pizza kitchen, action station, as well as my own club, so I technically had six folks on my crew, but they had their own areas to prep and work, so really, it was the club leads and our assistants to do food for about 600 every game. Even with all that, we were always under the gun to get things good to go for each home game. Prime rib at least I could pawn off on my action station guys--generally 14-16 per game, but that still left at least three protein dishes, three side dishes, salad, various amuse-bouche, cheese and various platters for folks to pick at, and a different set up each game, with a chaferless set up. Chef Jay hated ever putting out chafing dishes, so we had a LOT of cast iron to set up, a lot paella pans, and a lot of heat sources to disguise with bricks, pottery, and even heavy duty glass panes to jockey over, because we only had so much to go between both clubs. The one thing we did have an advantage on, is a year before I got there, some workmen shattered a heavy marble counter top that had been destined for one of the clubs. Jay made sure we kept the pieces, and those became part of our display sets, with a lot of odds and ends that chilled well, could be washed and sanitized, moved to different set ups with a fair amount of versatility, and you could build some great cascade spills for salads and appetizers, or even just to set out cheese and fruit platters on that didn't look like the wire frames that they were set on. We had a plethora of display pieces, and the mix and match approach made each game unique, but damn did it make prepping the clubs a pain in the tochis...
 
2013-09-18 12:11:01 AM  

johnny_vegas: Northern VA: Ray's the Steaks   http://www.raysthesteaks.com/


The food at Ray's is great but Jesus Christ does he need to get a new location.  Ambiance at that restaurant is terrible.
 
2013-09-18 12:55:20 AM  

Lsherm: johnny_vegas: Northern VA: Ray's the Steaks   http://www.raysthesteaks.com/

The food at Ray's is great but Jesus Christ does he need to get a new location.  Ambiance at that restaurant is terrible.


like a garage inside...and loud!
 
2013-09-18 01:09:11 AM  
Jesse's Embers on Ingersoll in Des Moines.  That is all.
 
2013-09-18 02:59:49 AM  
#8.  Get cancer from Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)  produced when cooking meat.
 
2013-09-18 07:51:58 AM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: I don't know about hating rare but well done is hated. I was at a famous KC steakhouse and they had it mentioned point blank on menu no well done steaks will be served. And before you snicker we know are steak in the heartland.


Everybody with a hot enough pan can cool rare.  Quality well done takes work and more importantly time.  Easier to snicker than do actual work.

  OG.
 
2013-09-18 09:30:31 AM  

Lusebagage: #8.  Get cancer from Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)  produced when cooking meat.


cdn.iwastesomuchtime.com
 
2013-09-18 10:32:32 AM  

bungle_jr: 2 reasons i don't like pink in the burger.

1 - questionable meat quality. unless i know that burger meat was a quality piece of steak until getting ground up a minute before hitting the grill/griddle/pan, then i don't know its quality. cook it till whatever is in it dies!

2 - texture. the texture of a rare sirloin is divine. the texture of pink ground beef is slimy mush. cook it till it's firm!

i love runny-yolk eggs, though. it's runny whites i can do without


All of this.
 
2013-09-18 02:26:12 PM  

IRQ12: thenunmber5:

Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

My apartment is filling up with smoke!  What should I do now?


Take a nap.
 
2013-09-18 06:36:05 PM  

China White Tea: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

+1.  Never met a steak I didn't like.  Some are better than others, sure, but they're always pretty good.

Same goes for coffee and beer.


There can be such a thing as far too much gristle, or overcooked, but otherwise agreed.

/Have been tempted to ask the server for a meat tenderizer at the table a couple of times.
//It'd be cathartic!
 
2013-09-18 10:32:04 PM  

DanZero: 8. THE STEAKS ARE FROM SYSCO !!!!111!!!!11!!

Thanks CNN.


At a better place they might be from Allen Brothers; that said, either one cooked poorly can taste more like Allen Edmonds.
 
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