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(CNN)   Seven popular scams that steakhouses use to fool you into spending money. Your dog wants aged beef kidney suet   (eatocracy.cnn.com) divider line 239
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27378 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Sep 2013 at 1:09 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-17 05:15:45 PM

hubiestubert: Oddly enough, considering that I tend to cook steaks forty or fifty times a night, yeah, I DO think that. Because I have a lot more practice at it.


Then why can't you cook it the way I order it?  Huh??
(No nevermind... nobody ever cooks it how I order it.  I think it might be illegal.)
 
2013-09-17 05:18:51 PM

ski9600: Darn it!  I just bought three little lamb t-bones an hour ago. (he says they suck in #7)

/at least I didn't pay $50


They suck when you burn them. Don't burn them.

For next time the rib chops for the win.  The best taste/cost ratio is a cut occasionally called an arm chop.  Get the ones with the rib bones on the tail.

/mmmmm lamb
 
2013-09-17 05:22:51 PM

tricycleracer: I'll pistol whip the next person who says "sous vide".



www.protias.com
 
2013-09-17 05:27:23 PM

wee: hubiestubert:
I've only had a steak better than what I can make at one place: http://www.alexanderssteakhouse.com/


OMFG, that looks expensive and great!www.alexanderssteakhouse.com
 
2013-09-17 05:40:45 PM

TheWhoppah: Illustrated guide to perfect steak... first get a prime rib eye:  $15+
[a248.e.akamai.net image 600x450]
Add spices like salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder... a little paprika makes a nice color... not enough to change the flavor.   ($10 but you already have this)

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 320x214]


Fill a small cooler with hot water:  ($20 but you already have this)
[i.walmartimages.com image 500x500]

Test the temp with a digital instant read thermometer:  ($8 at the supermarket or Target)
[img1.targetimg1.com image 410x410]
If the temp is more than 132, add cold water to bring it down to between 131 and 132.  If it is less than 131 then add hot water to bring it up, but not over 132.  This is the hardest part of the process.


Put the steak in a ziplok bag... one steak per bag.  ($3 but you already have this)
[www.vitacost.com image 850x279]

Close the half way and then put the bag mostly into the water such that the steak is submerged but the top of the bag is above the water.  The water forces all the air out of the bag and then close the bag the rest of the way so it is water tight with no air.

Wait at least one hour, longer if it is a really thick steak.  YOU CANNOT OVER-COOK THE STEAK BUT YOU CAN UNDER-COOK IT.
[www.drmenlo.com image 375x331]

While you are waiting, prepare the remainder of the meal or get roaring drunk.  Your choice.

When you take the steak out of the bag it will have an unappealing grey color.  Don't worry.

Put steak on a cold grill or a similar fire-proof place:
[www.momgoesgreen.com image 360x360]


Fire up the MAPP gas torch.   $8 Home Depot
[www.finehomebuilding.com image 300x325]

Sear that steak with the 3000 degree flame!  Be sure to hit the sides all the way around...  Then flip it over and do the other side.

Put it on the plate and optionally rub a little pat of butter all over it:
[kindawonderful.typepad.com image 350x269]

Serve and enjoy a steak that is evenly cooked medium rare all the way through instead of well o ...


Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat
 
2013-09-17 05:44:16 PM

groppet: My friends know some meat people. So when I go visit my folks they always load me up with whatever they have overflowing from the freezer. I get to see them this weekend hmmmmmm.


mmmmmmm, meat people.
 
2013-09-17 05:47:41 PM

thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat


FTFY

/Why waste seasoning on your paper towels?
//Season the steak AFTER it comes to temp - the salt needs time to work on the meat, but the spices are better if you apply them just before hitting the heat
///While I enjoy grilling, and cook outside pretty much every day I can, the best steak I ever made was with the rocket-hot-cast-iron method.
 
2013-09-17 05:50:38 PM

Manfred J. Hattan: PanicMan: cookiefleck: I love the jabs at Peter Luger' s...

Which surprised me.  I've heard really good things about that place, and I was thinking of checking it out next time I'm in NY.

You should go.  They use suet (lard leaf) with butter to drizzle on the steaks.  Whatever this guy says, they're outstanding.  The bacon thing is a ripoff, but to my knowledge no one has ever ordered the bacon at Peter Luger.  You get the tomato and onion with steak sauce appetizer and the steak.  Maybe a side or two if you're extra hungry.


The bacon is good. Not because its special bacon, but because it's grilled bacon. A great warmup for steak.

I had mediocre steak the last time I was there, but what can you expect with a large party of clearly inebriated men, obviously from out of town?
 
2013-09-17 05:51:00 PM
thenunmber5:

Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat


My apartment is filling up with smoke!  What should I do now?
 
2013-09-17 05:51:54 PM
Just my .02 bucks. Best tasting, most consistent steak I've experienced was from a local Italian restaurant called Jimmys. 16oz ribeye, never frozen, with a garlic butter marinade. Inch thick at the table, and in 10 years, maybe 30 - 40 visits, nary a scrap left. The last one was 3 weeks before the place burned out and the check was $38 for the wife and I. One of our last nights on the town it turned out.

/wish they could have found restart money
//huge *sigh*
///slashies!
 
2013-09-17 05:52:38 PM

thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat


No, that is the second-best way to do it.  If you get rip-roaring drunk while doing it that way then there is a good chance your steak will come out medium... or worse!   The cooler method is better because you don't have to watch the time and you can't screw it up no matter how much you drink.
 
2013-09-17 05:55:22 PM

IRQ12: thenunmber5:

Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

My apartment is filling up with smoke!  What should I do now?


breath deep
 
2013-09-17 05:59:23 PM

praxcelis: thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

FTFY

/Why waste seasoning on your paper towels?
//Season the steak AFTER it comes to temp - the salt needs time to work on the meat, but the spices are better if you apply them just before hitting the heat
///While I enjoy grilling, and cook outside pretty much every day I can, the best steak I ever made was with the rocket-hot-cast-iron method.


i use seasoning rubs,Some does get on the towels. but also lets a seasoning get in to the meat and not just sit on the outside
 
2013-09-17 06:01:06 PM

TheWhoppah: thenumber5: you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

No, that is the second-best way to do it.  If you get rip-roaring drunk while doing it that way then there is a good chance your steak will come out medium... or worse!   The cooler method is better because you don't have to watch the time and you can't screw it up no matter how much you drink.


This is true, also when you have a rissotto on or other fickle food it's nice to not have to fuss with all that.

Also, it is VERY hard for an amateur to cook a thick cut tbone (and other like filet) mid-rare end to end.  Sous vide makes it childs play.  I like to barbecue too but when I want perfection I Sous vide.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-09-17 06:09:32 PM

johnny_vegas: Alton Brown?


I lean more Harold McGee and Michael Ruhlman.

Cortez the Killer: Hey, wee, got some plans to build that crockpot sous vide? I've been doing steaks in the super cheap style of hot tap water in an ice chest. It works good for steaks, but you have to monitor and add hot water every once in a while. That becomes a minor pain. If I got that temp controller, I'd branch out into other things to cooks with the sous vide method. Also, wouldn't mind some pointers on a good kimchee recipe. I've not eaten any since I was stationed at Camp Red Cloud S. Korea. I'd like to give it a try since I've got the sauerkraut down.


You want one of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008KVCPH2 and also one of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000KKLONM and one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Cantex-Industries-Junction-5133709U-Fittings/dp / B000NCUVZE
Next get a single outlet socket from Home Depot or the hardware store (or amazon, I guess).

It's very easy to wire up.  Here's one diagram: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/gallery/data/500/medium/STC-1000_outlet_w i ring.jpg; That powers both the heating and cooling relays.  My unit only does heating since I'm not brewing beer or curing ham or whatever.

I cut about 2 feet off the extension cord, strip it, and use those wires internally.   Also leaves you with a near 6' cord for your controller. You'll need a couple wirenuts, too.

Wire it all up, then test it with a cold beer and a light.  Once you know it's all good, use a dremel to cut the holes in the box's lid, then drill holes in the box sides for the power and sensor wires.  Install the controller, re-attach all the wires, install the socket, screw it down, attach the lid, test it again.  Should take about 45-60 minutes.  One tip: use zip ties inside the box as strain relief for the wires.

As far as kimchi, here's the stuff you want: http://www.amazon.com/Singsong-Korean-Pepper-Powder-1-10/dp/B004W71CJ U /

Slice up Napa cabbage however leafy/thin you want it. Slice up daikon radish, in whatever shapes you like (I go thin strips). Do the same with carrot, then thinly dice whatever quantity of garlic you like.  Pack the cabbage in layers into your crock like with kraut, but in between each layer where you'd just add salt, also throw in some pepper and some amount of the radish/carrot/garlic.  Continue with the next layer.  Top off with a standard brine (1/4 cup salt in one quart water) when done if need be.

For my 7.5 liter crock I used about half a cup of the hot pepper powder on my last bacth. I will likely go spicier next batch.

I know most recipes say to soak the cabbage leaves in salty water and then cut/pack them, but I treat them just like kraut and it works fine.  My "kraut-chi" might offend a Korean grandma, but they aren't thick on the ground in my area. :-)

ski9600: OMFG, that looks expensive and great!


Every steak I've had there is good.  But the ones the Japanese fellows brought for him to play round with were beyond outstanding.  And worth $325.  It was like eating beef-flavored heaven...
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-09-17 06:13:09 PM

IRQ12: Sous vide makes it childs play. I like to barbecue too but when I want perfection I Sous vide.


It does.  Like I said, it's basically cheating.  I also like being able to put steaks on at home while on lunch break and then sear them off whenever everything else is ready.

Another benefit is the pan drippings.  You can't make a pan sauce from the stuff that drips onto coals and hisses.
 
2013-09-17 06:14:51 PM

tricycleracer: I'll pistol whip the next person who says "sous vide verde".


/pet peave.
 
2013-09-17 06:17:47 PM

wee: j...


What actually goes in the crockpot?
 
2013-09-17 06:52:33 PM

wee: IRQ12: Sous vide makes it childs play. I like to barbecue too but when I want perfection I Sous vide.

It does.  Like I said, it's basically cheating.  I also like being able to put steaks on at home while on lunch break and then sear them off whenever everything else is ready.

Another benefit is the pan drippings.  You can't make a pan sauce from the stuff that drips onto coals and hisses.


In that list above where is the element that goes in the water?
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-09-17 06:54:49 PM

IRQ12: What actually goes in the crockpot?


You vacuum-seal whatever it is that you want to cook and place the bags in the water.  You can get by using ziplocs, but it's not quite the same since you don't have that close contact with the water.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-09-17 06:56:32 PM

IRQ12: In that list above where is the element that goes in the water?


You don't need one.  The outlet on the controller turns crock pot on and off. So you plug the crockpot in, turn it on high, fill it with hot water, insert the probe and come back when the water is exactly how hot you need it.
 
2013-09-17 07:07:35 PM
Ahhhhhhh.  So there is what kind of temperature variance do you see?
 
2013-09-17 07:10:01 PM
The problem with cooking steaks is the heat factor. Unfortunately most sub $500 grill that most individuals own can't get the temp up to the 450-500 range in a consistent manner.
 
2013-09-17 07:26:50 PM

OscarTamerz: The trick that I was told about was that steaks are cooked in special ovens above 1000 degrees much like a pizza oven or under solid flame front devices called salamanders


thenumber5: ///Now, if i could ever get my own Salamander,


While not technically a Salamander, there are home ranges with the type of infrared ceramic brick type broiler that are typically in salamanders. I've got a Blue Star range at home with an 1850 degree broiler, which is the same as in their actual salamander. It does make for a steak with a perfect sear and a perfect rare/medium rare with no transition. I have good technique for cooking steaks on the grill, but the super broiler unquestionably gives me better and more consistent results.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-09-17 07:59:45 PM

IRQ12: Ahhhhhhh.  So there is what kind of temperature variance do you see?


Once the ceramic bowl of the crock pot gets warm it take maybe 30 minutes to keep the temp consistent.  If you drop a couple steaks in, the temp goes down maybe 8-10 degrees C, then up a degree past your target, then back and forth until it's with half a degree at any given time. Of course, if you have a really cold kitchen then a towel over the top is called for.
 
2013-09-17 09:07:19 PM

ElLoco: A couple of my tenants run cattle on the big corners or non-farmable areas of land. Sometimes I get lucky and get an entire cow full of 'unlabeled' usda prime. Usually, though, it is 'just way better than you can buy at the store' grade... which is good, but I'm not fooling myself into imagining it into prime beef. I hate buying beef at the grocery store and usually stick to the custom cutters when/if I buy it. My local guy does an awesome job with dry-aging and I'll have him do a 22-28 day age on the best loins when I have whole beeves or sides done in his shop.

Most of my hamburger comes from the grocery store, but with a kind of a twist. Many grocery stores around here put their cheapo steak cuts like select sirloin or ribeye on sale for at or less than the cost of decent hamburger meat. Most of the stores will custom grind hamburger over 10 pounds for free. So... I'll ask the meat market guy if he has any uncut sirloins or ribeyes in the back, have him weight it out at the sale price (and sometimes get a little additional price break since it isn't cut), and he pitches it in the grinder. Ground sirloin/ribeye for the same or less cost than the pre-packaged scrap meat hamburger.


I work in a meat dept ... ground chuck roast is the best bang for your buck and is very tasty
 
2013-09-17 09:23:57 PM
Get a job with an expense account or hang around sales guys = Never pay for a restaurant meal again.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-09-17 09:58:11 PM

Macular Degenerate: hang around sales guys


Could be served $1000 steaks and it'd still not be worth it to have to deal with that level of annoyance...
 
2013-09-17 11:34:58 PM

wee: hubiestubert: Too much time, too much space, and the cook time is a pain in the tochis.

Well for a home cook like me, it's basically cheating.  And I don't mind the time issue, since it actually helps.  Basically once everything else is nearly done, 120 seconds in a exceedingly hot cast iron skillet.  Rest it and it's ready (and I typically make a quick sauce while the meat is resting).  Now if i had to serve 60 per night like you, I don't know if it's all that feasible unless you have a giant machine. And then what do you do with meat that's been heated but not ordered?

I've only had a steak better than what I can make at one place: http://www.alexanderssteakhouse.com/  All the rest fall short in some way.  (Honestly, I think they fail to measure up because of the quality of beef. The ranch-raised stuff we get damn near tastes like elk, it's totally free-range and has a really meaty/earthy flavor.)


I will admit that perhaps I snapped a bit, and for that I apologize. I see a lot of hobby cooks who seem to think that their experience translates into line experience. Sous vide in a restaurant takes up a fair amount of space, and it requires that you seal your cuts up ahead of time, so that you can drop them in to order. Which takes up a lot of space for prep, a lot of space for storage, and cleaning, and I despise wasted space and time. Not when you have folks who have the skill to cook any dang piece of meat put before them to the proper temp, on command. It's a method that had a time and place, and it had some traction for a while, but most places realized that the time and space issues made it an unwieldy process, especially when they have folks with skills who can do equal or better just using their own instincts.

And that is really what it is about, on the professional level. You handle cuts long enough, you get a feel for each one's characteristics. From tenderloin, ribeye--and ribeyes can vary fair wildly depending on the beast it was carved from--to just simple 1x1 New Yorks. You judge by instinct, because you've cut the damn things yourself. You know the fat content, you know the texture, you know with a fair degree of certainty how they'll fare. And with marinade, without, on wood fired grill, in a wood fired oven, on gas, on coals, you get a feel for the equipment you work with. That translates to intimate knowledge on how each cut will fare.

I got spoiled when I was at the Deerfield Inn. Yazwinski Farms down the road raised all our beef, and they slaughtered them pretty much to order. We got amazing, grass fed beef, and we did a great deal of carved to order steaks--you want a 6oz, we cut a 6oz ribeye, or a 12oz, or a 24oz if that was your desire. We got brilliant sweetbreads, we were essentially in a culinary Disneyland whenever we got our beef order in. It made for a lot of fun experimentation, and consistently amazing product. Our chickens were local as well, along with the eggs, most of our cheeses were local, and we owned a farm share stake, for a load of produce that changed as the seasons came in. Our bacon was done in a local smokehouse, and was simply to die for. Seafood...I started every damn day with a cup of our chowder, so that I could look at our list, go over specials, notes, and take a quick inventory of what product we had just got in, and look over our catering schedule, and it never failed to put me in a good mood. We never got in the Ono that I constantly harped on to the Executive Chefs about, before Irene killed the place. 5 and half feet of water in the first floor, and that wiped out the Carriage House in the back, our downstairs produce walk in, our freezers, our meat coolers, and our downstairs prep and service kitchen for catering. Over $2M in damage total, and the restoration went apace, but by the time things were back online, the crew had scattered to the four winds, the Executive Chefs had flown the coop, and there was no way in 10,000 Hells I was going to go back and face the Innkeeper without their back up. HE wanted to do sous vide, and he got it with the new Exec, who just left, and took his entire crew after less than four months. Karl is a great guy to raise money, and a terrible man to work for directly...

Sous vide is a method for a home cook. It had a time and place in the industry, and it was a fun experiment, and some folks have made it into a signature, but from a professional perspective, it's a lot of time and space that could be better spent--and the one thing that professional kitchens never seem to have enough of is time and space. Even at the Inn, with a whole downstairs prep kitchen and catering space, we were constantly strapped for space to work and store crap. Even at Glenndale Arena, with a 16,000 seat arena, with a full on production kitchen, and satellite kitchens across the building, we were constantly fighting for space and equipment. And in fairness, that was only with about 16 full time chefs, sous, and line cooks. I did one of the clubs, and folks were amazed that for a spread for 350, it usually only took myself, the club lead for our sister club downstairs, my assistant, Shane's assistant, and the Executive Sous to prep for both clubs. Our building's garde manger, she had a crew of only three, to do apps and salads for all the suites as well as for the clubs. THAT was a nasty ass crew. I was positively brimming with staff, running both our building's pizza kitchen, action station, as well as my own club, so I technically had six folks on my crew, but they had their own areas to prep and work, so really, it was the club leads and our assistants to do food for about 600 every game. Even with all that, we were always under the gun to get things good to go for each home game. Prime rib at least I could pawn off on my action station guys--generally 14-16 per game, but that still left at least three protein dishes, three side dishes, salad, various amuse-bouche, cheese and various platters for folks to pick at, and a different set up each game, with a chaferless set up. Chef Jay hated ever putting out chafing dishes, so we had a LOT of cast iron to set up, a lot paella pans, and a lot of heat sources to disguise with bricks, pottery, and even heavy duty glass panes to jockey over, because we only had so much to go between both clubs. The one thing we did have an advantage on, is a year before I got there, some workmen shattered a heavy marble counter top that had been destined for one of the clubs. Jay made sure we kept the pieces, and those became part of our display sets, with a lot of odds and ends that chilled well, could be washed and sanitized, moved to different set ups with a fair amount of versatility, and you could build some great cascade spills for salads and appetizers, or even just to set out cheese and fruit platters on that didn't look like the wire frames that they were set on. We had a plethora of display pieces, and the mix and match approach made each game unique, but damn did it make prepping the clubs a pain in the tochis...
 
2013-09-18 12:11:01 AM

johnny_vegas: Northern VA: Ray's the Steaks   http://www.raysthesteaks.com/


The food at Ray's is great but Jesus Christ does he need to get a new location.  Ambiance at that restaurant is terrible.
 
2013-09-18 12:55:20 AM

Lsherm: johnny_vegas: Northern VA: Ray's the Steaks   http://www.raysthesteaks.com/

The food at Ray's is great but Jesus Christ does he need to get a new location.  Ambiance at that restaurant is terrible.


like a garage inside...and loud!
 
2013-09-18 01:09:11 AM
Jesse's Embers on Ingersoll in Des Moines.  That is all.
 
2013-09-18 02:59:49 AM
#8.  Get cancer from Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)  produced when cooking meat.
 
2013-09-18 07:51:58 AM

Mid_mo_mad_man: I don't know about hating rare but well done is hated. I was at a famous KC steakhouse and they had it mentioned point blank on menu no well done steaks will be served. And before you snicker we know are steak in the heartland.


Everybody with a hot enough pan can cool rare.  Quality well done takes work and more importantly time.  Easier to snicker than do actual work.

  OG.
 
2013-09-18 09:30:31 AM

Lusebagage: #8.  Get cancer from Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)  produced when cooking meat.


cdn.iwastesomuchtime.com
 
2013-09-18 10:32:32 AM

bungle_jr: 2 reasons i don't like pink in the burger.

1 - questionable meat quality. unless i know that burger meat was a quality piece of steak until getting ground up a minute before hitting the grill/griddle/pan, then i don't know its quality. cook it till whatever is in it dies!

2 - texture. the texture of a rare sirloin is divine. the texture of pink ground beef is slimy mush. cook it till it's firm!

i love runny-yolk eggs, though. it's runny whites i can do without


All of this.
 
2013-09-18 02:26:12 PM

IRQ12: thenunmber5:

Or...

you actually learn how to cook a steak
A: StartCharcoal Grill (Chunk hardwoodCharcoal, lit with Electric charcoal starter)
B: Salt (and season how you like if you wish)
C. place on Flat Plate with absorbent paper towel on top and bottom, place Second Plate on top of the meat with a Soup Can(Or pie wight)
D: Allow Steak to Come to Room Temp
( A~D, Should Take you ~ 1 hour)
E: Now that your Coals are good and hot,, make two zones in your Grill, one Side with the Very Hot Coals, the other with none
D: sear steaks to liking, move to "Cold" side to finish
E: Eat

My apartment is filling up with smoke!  What should I do now?


Take a nap.
 
2013-09-18 06:36:05 PM

China White Tea: Pharmdawg: There's too much snobbery here. It's meat off a cow's arse. It's good, eat it.

+1.  Never met a steak I didn't like.  Some are better than others, sure, but they're always pretty good.

Same goes for coffee and beer.


There can be such a thing as far too much gristle, or overcooked, but otherwise agreed.

/Have been tempted to ask the server for a meat tenderizer at the table a couple of times.
//It'd be cathartic!
 
2013-09-18 10:32:04 PM

DanZero: 8. THE STEAKS ARE FROM SYSCO !!!!111!!!!11!!

Thanks CNN.


At a better place they might be from Allen Brothers; that said, either one cooked poorly can taste more like Allen Edmonds.
 
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