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(Fox News)   Don't want to get speeding tickets? Just become a State legislator in Washington. Cops can't ticket you   (foxnews.com) divider line 88
    More: Asinine, speeding tickets, legislative session, state legislators, Washington State Patrol  
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8890 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Sep 2013 at 10:17 AM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-17 09:07:17 AM
I can see how delaying senators on their way to vote could be a problem.  but then so could delay a doctor on his way to surgery.  We'll just work them like the enforcement cameras do, take a picture and mail you the ticket.

Tada!  No delay and you still have to obey the same rules as everyone else.
 
2013-09-17 09:27:25 AM
I don't know about Washington, but in my home state the deal is that they're immune from prosecution (of any kind) on their way to/from the statehouse and while performing official duties there.

It insulates them from influence, so I think it's probably OK if they use the same mechanism to occasionally do stupid crap.
 
2013-09-17 09:32:19 AM

Fubini: I don't know about Washington, but in my home state the deal is that they're immune from prosecution (of any kind) on their way to/from the statehouse and while performing official duties there.

It insulates them from influence, so I think it's probably OK if they use the same mechanism to occasionally do stupid crap.


Same thing in my State, of course that means every session you hear about a state rep getting out of a DUI. But hey what are you going to do.
 
2013-09-17 09:52:00 AM
Step 1: Become a Washington State legislator
Step 2: Get a film crew and have them film me driving 120, snorting coke off of a hooker's tits, and flipping off the cops while wagging my dick at them.
Step 3: Profit!
 
2013-09-17 10:02:20 AM
I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.

But for the 15 days before the legislature is in session?  How long does it take for these guys to get to work?  And what about if they are detained by police for other violations of law?  Can police not arrest them for DWI or domestic abuse too?  Or drug possession?
 
2013-09-17 10:10:27 AM
I wonder how many votes they miss.
 
2013-09-17 10:19:28 AM

SlothB77: I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.

But for the 15 days before the legislature is in session?  How long does it take for these guys to get to work?  And what about if they are detained by police for other violations of law?  Can police not arrest them for DWI or domestic abuse too?  Or drug possession?


Yep, the federal constitution has the exact same provision for the exact same reason.  This is not news in the slightest.
 
2013-09-17 10:21:37 AM
Great the state can still be sued for millions (it doesn't have BTW) When one of these boneheads causes an accident because of excessive speed. Way to go Washington...
 
2013-09-17 10:22:17 AM
It is that way in Georgia too.  Legislators can only be arrested for felonies while they are in session.
 
2013-09-17 10:22:35 AM
Or they could adjust their schedule and allow a little more time to get to work like the rest of the human race....
 
2013-09-17 10:23:02 AM

SlothB77: But for the 15 days before the legislature is in session?


The statute was probably written in the early 1900s, when it took a lot longer to get to the capital for the session.
 
2013-09-17 10:23:42 AM

TheGreatGazoo: It is that way in Georgia too.  Legislators can only be arrested for felonies while they are in session.


It's that way at the federal level as well, and I'd be pretty surprised if there were any states that didn't have similar protections.
 
2013-09-17 10:24:31 AM
Here's an idea. Clock them. Send them a ticket in the mail. Tack an extra $1000 on. "Call it an Above The Law Tax."

It's going to be great when some senator is speeding at 100 miles an hour and kills a family of 6 or something. I guess it won't be his fault, will it... citizen?
 
2013-09-17 10:24:38 AM

Circusdog320: Great the state can still be sued for millions (it doesn't have BTW) When one of these boneheads causes an accident because of excessive speed. Way to go Washington...


I guess the safety of others is not in their best interests.
 
2013-09-17 10:24:39 AM
They can't be arrested for crimes while on their way to commit worse crimes. Sounds reasonable to me.
 
2013-09-17 10:25:51 AM
330 million people, 2 parties... this surprises you?

/the rest of the world laughs at your "democracy"
 
2013-09-17 10:26:30 AM
From a thread on the Politics Tab today:

Dr Dreidel: Uranus Is Huge!: "Legislative privilege" has no place in an open democracy.

Limited privilege? Hell yeah it does - like the US Constitution's Speech & Debate Clause. You don't want Executive (or worse, other-Legislative) shenanigans farking with the quorum, whip count or vote, and you do want Legislative speech absolutely protected (or at least as protected as yours & mine).

For what looks like open, naked politicking that runs specifically counter to the law as written? No immunity.

 
2013-09-17 10:26:32 AM
you know, I'm getting really tired of our elected officials privileged lifestyles.

Tell me again how they represent the common man...
 
2013-09-17 10:27:24 AM

SlothB77: I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.


So the solution to prevent cops from illegal activity is to give another group immunity?
 
2013-09-17 10:27:27 AM
Section. 6.

The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.


Can't have elected officials waylaid to prevent them from voting
 
Ant
2013-09-17 10:29:49 AM
It's OK because all of our state legislators are highly-trained race car drivers.
 
2013-09-17 10:31:25 AM

JacobDavidWatson: 330 million people, 2 parties... this surprises you?

/the rest of the world laughs at your "democracy"


Don't blame me- I voted for Kodos.
 
2013-09-17 10:31:58 AM
I'm surprised that people are.... surprised by this.  They taught us this in school.
 
2013-09-17 10:32:05 AM

EvilEgg: I can see how delaying senators on their way to vote could be a problem.  but then so could delay a doctor on his way to surgery.  We'll just work them like the enforcement cameras do, take a picture and mail you the ticket.

Tada!  No delay and you still have to obey the same rules as everyone else.


Now, why the hell would I want to do that?
 
Ant
2013-09-17 10:32:31 AM
Diplomatic immunity!
www.weirdir.com
 
2013-09-17 10:33:16 AM

Neighborhood Watch: Is it a blue state, run by democrats?

Check.


/should have known...


Texas has identical protections in place for state legislators.
 
2013-09-17 10:36:20 AM
This only happens in police states.
 
2013-09-17 10:40:08 AM
Illinois has those rules in effect as well. This is not new, and quite prevalent. It's nothing to get your panties in a twist about, unless they were drunk and killed someone. It keeps the opposing party from setting up accidents or whatever to keep a legislator from voting on a particular bill. And you know they would, too.
 
2013-09-17 10:42:09 AM
Change the laws so lawmakers can be ticketed for traffic violations with the requirement that police must use the minimum amount of time to obtain drivers information.
 
2013-09-17 10:42:12 AM
Inquisitive Inquisitor:
Neighborhood Watch: Is it a blue state, run by democrats?
Check.
/should have known...

Texas has identical protections in place for state legislators.


Meh.  Find me a state where the government/union officials and corporate execs *don't* own the traffic court judges and I'll be impressed.

Traffic tickets, much like taxes, nanny-state laws, and government-run pensions and healthcare, are for us plebs, not our revered patricians.
 
2013-09-17 10:42:14 AM
I give you §149 of the Kentucky Constitution:

"Voters, in all cases except treason, felony, breach of surety of the peace, or violation of the election laws, shall be privileged from arrest during their attendance at elections, and while they are going to and returning therefrom."
 
2013-09-17 10:42:15 AM

ikanreed: SlothB77: I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.

But for the 15 days before the legislature is in session?  How long does it take for these guys to get to work?  And what about if they are detained by police for other violations of law?  Can police not arrest them for DWI or domestic abuse too?  Or drug possession?

Yep, the federal constitution has the exact same provision for the exact same reason.  This is not news in the slightest.


I thought these laws were everywhere.  One of the more disgraceful strategies we've seen in the last few years was for one party to hype up phony baloney fears so as to make it harder for constituents of the other party to vote.  Since the executive branch has the power to detain pretty much anyone at any time on just one person's say-so, we need laws like this to put a check on that power.  Otherwise, given the current political climate, I wouldn't put it past certain political groups to abuse executive power in an attempt to alter the vote.
 
2013-09-17 10:43:33 AM
2013 Session Quick Facts (including 2 special sessions)
-Number of Roll Call votes in the House:  694
-Number of Bills Introduced in the Legislature: 2,492
-Number of Roll Call votes in the Senate: 619
-Number of Bills Passed by the Legislature: 389
-Number of legislators who didn't miss any of these votes:  53
-Number of legislators who missed more than 50 votes:  10

washingtonvotes.org
 
2013-09-17 10:51:15 AM
On the one hand we have sleazy politicians and other we have the farking pigs...I, don't even, it's lose/lose.
 
2013-09-17 10:51:31 AM

dahmers love zombie: Step 1: Become a Washington State legislator
Step 2: Get a film crew and have them film me driving 120, snorting coke off of a hooker's tits, and flipping off the cops while wagging my dick at them.
Step 3: Profit!


dynamitemonkey.jpg
 
2013-09-17 10:51:55 AM

Persnickety: ikanreed: SlothB77: I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.

But for the 15 days before the legislature is in session?  How long does it take for these guys to get to work?  And what about if they are detained by police for other violations of law?  Can police not arrest them for DWI or domestic abuse too?  Or drug possession?

Yep, the federal constitution has the exact same provision for the exact same reason.  This is not news in the slightest.

I thought these laws were everywhere.  One of the more disgraceful strategies we've seen in the last few years was for one party to hype up phony baloney fears so as to make it harder for constituents of the other party to vote.  Since the executive branch has the power to detain pretty much anyone at any time on just one person's say-so, we need laws like this to put a check on that power.  Otherwise, given the current political climate, I wouldn't put it past certain political groups to abuse executive power in an attempt to alter the vote.


Wouldn't put past=happens all the time in tin-pot dictatorships that have "presidencies."  It's like people who propose no pay or low pay for representatives.  It just encourages corruption.
 
2013-09-17 10:52:50 AM

JacobDavidWatson: 330 million people, 2 parties... this surprises you?

/the rest of the world laughs at your "democracy"


Yeah, so that's what?  Europe and Asia?  That's two countries.  Who the hell cares what they think?
 
2013-09-17 10:53:16 AM

cgraves67: Illinois has those rules in effect as well. This is not new, and quite prevalent. It's nothing to get your panties in a twist about, unless they were drunk and killed someone. It keeps the opposing party from setting up accidents or whatever to keep a legislator from voting on a particular bill. And you know they would, too.


Someone already provided my response to this...

Circusdog320: Or they could adjust their schedule and allow a little more time to get to work like the rest of the human race....
 
2013-09-17 10:53:46 AM
None of these problems would exist if we would just vote the Democrats more power.
 
2013-09-17 10:53:59 AM

EvilEgg: I can see how delaying senators on their way to vote could be a problem.  but then so could delay a doctor on his way to surgery.  We'll just work them like the enforcement cameras do, take a picture and mail you the ticket.

Tada!  No delay and you still have to obey the same rules as everyone else.


Or we could dock them some of the money they keep voting on for thier own raises....while simultaneously sequestering our teachers, soldiers, air traffic controllers due to the fact that they haven't made a decision in four years among the whole lot of them....Just sayin....
 
2013-09-17 10:57:40 AM

Fubini: I don't know about Washington, but in my home state the deal is that they're immune from prosecution (of any kind) on their way to/from the statehouse and while performing official duties there.

It insulates them from influence, so I think it's probably OK if they use the same mechanism to occasionally do stupid crap.


So, from a legal stand point, they can drive to a vote 50 mph over the limit, drunk, and rape a few people along the way?
 
2013-09-17 11:02:46 AM

Satanic_Hamster: Fubini: I don't know about Washington, but in my home state the deal is that they're immune from prosecution (of any kind) on their way to/from the statehouse and while performing official duties there.

It insulates them from influence, so I think it's probably OK if they use the same mechanism to occasionally do stupid crap.

So, from a legal stand point, they can drive to a vote 50 mph over the limit, drunk, and rape a few people along the way?


High crimes get an exception.  And they will be waiting outside the legislative building for when the session is done.
 
2013-09-17 11:03:15 AM

JacobDavidWatson: 330 million people, 2 parties... this surprises you?

/the rest of the world laughs at your "democracy"


Not really. Plus, there are no two parties.

Just monkeys who legislate in favor of whoever has the most money.  And themselves.

SO PICK ONE!

FOR FREEDOM!
 
2013-09-17 11:05:46 AM

acronym: SlothB77: I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.

So the solution to prevent cops from illegal activity is to give another group immunity?


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-09-17 11:12:41 AM
I used to work with a guy who was the mayor of a small town in southern New Jersey. He told me that municipal officials cannot be ticketed in New Jersey because they "might" (he used the word "might") be traveling on official business.

He even had a little gold badge in his wallet to show the cops if he were ever pulled over.
 
2013-09-17 11:27:23 AM

cgraves67: Illinois has those rules in effect as well. This is not new, and quite prevalent. It's nothing to get your panties in a twist about, unless they were drunk and killed someone. It keeps the opposing party from setting up accidents or whatever to keep a legislator from voting on a particular bill. And you know they would, too.


Funny you should mention that.  A few years ago, I was driving home at around 9:00 PM.  I live in a small town just south of the University of Illinois, and there's a couple of small stretches road that are sort of half-country, half-residential.  The speed limit on the particular stretch of road I was on is 35 MPH.  As I was doing about 37, some maniac runs up behind me, tailgating the shiat out of me at about 80-90 MPH.  He then passes me in a no-passing zone, swerves back into the right lane and nearly loses control of his car.  There were US House of Representatives plates on the car.  Judging by the swerving that continued, he was drunk as a skunk.  Knowing who it probably was, he was almost certainly out of his mind on blow as well.
 
2013-09-17 11:27:39 AM

Cybernetic: I used to work with a guy who was the mayor of a small town in southern New Jersey. He told me that municipal officials cannot be ticketed in New Jersey because they "might" (he used the word "might") be traveling on official business.

He even had a little gold badge in his wallet to show the cops if he were ever pulled over.


When he says "business" does that mean going out to extort money from his constituents. It is Jersey...
 
2013-09-17 11:32:22 AM
What special rules for politicians!? You don't say.
 
2013-09-17 11:36:04 AM

stuffy: What special rules for politicians!? You don't say.


Politicians are better than us. Smarter too.
 
2013-09-17 11:40:58 AM

Persnickety: ikanreed: SlothB77: I can see the police being used to detain or delay legislators of the opposite party from getting to a vote.  I can see that being a problem.

But for the 15 days before the legislature is in session?  How long does it take for these guys to get to work?  And what about if they are detained by police for other violations of law?  Can police not arrest them for DWI or domestic abuse too?  Or drug possession?

Yep, the federal constitution has the exact same provision for the exact same reason.  This is not news in the slightest.

I thought these laws were everywhere.  One of the more disgraceful strategies we've seen in the last few years was for one party to hype up phony baloney fears so as to make it harder for constituents of the other party to vote.  Since the executive branch has the power to detain pretty much anyone at any time on just one person's say-so, we need laws like this to put a check on that power.  Otherwise, given the current political climate, I wouldn't put it past certain political groups to abuse executive power in an attempt to alter the vote.


Presonally, I could see a good rule being they cannot be compelled to answer questions or be in court during session. Anything more than a traffic ticket has to wait until after the session ends, when you can be prosecuted for any actions during the session. You can't stop them from taking part, but they don't get the benefits.
 
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