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(Ars Technica)   Gaben sayeth unto the dirty console-gaming peasants: Linux is the future. New hardware is coming. And in true Gaben fashion, there is no third thing   (arstechnica.com) divider line 170
    More: Spiffy, linux, Left 4 Dead 2, hardware design  
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2347 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Sep 2013 at 7:55 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



170 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-17 07:09:36 AM  
I'm hoping he's right, so I can start using Linux a lot more often.
 
2013-09-17 07:35:01 AM  
Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?
 
2013-09-17 07:44:50 AM  

log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?


This. At best you will get decent hardware support for very specific configurations the steam box uses.
 
2013-09-17 07:46:13 AM  

log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?


And it will continue to be the OS of the future.
 
2013-09-17 08:01:33 AM  
Why do people expect Half Life 3 will be the greatest game never made? Valve makes so much money selling other people's games, they have no impetus to make anything great themselves.
 
2013-09-17 08:10:18 AM  
People game on Linux all the goddamned time because Android. That has nothing to do with Valve or its shiatty DRM delivery service.
 
2013-09-17 08:20:32 AM  

Subby:



oneping.net

Love the Half-Life games. Impatiently waiting for episode 3.
 
2013-09-17 08:20:41 AM  

gnosis301: Why do people expect Half Life 3 will be the greatest game never made? Valve makes so much money selling other people's games, they have no impetus to make anything great themselves. can release games when they are ready, rather than be forced to release whatever is done when the development money runs

 
2013-09-17 08:20:44 AM  

gnosis301: Why do people expect Half Life 3 will be the greatest game never made? Valve makes so much money selling other people's games, they have no impetus to make anything great themselves.


Portal series?
Left for Dead series?
 
2013-09-17 08:27:42 AM  
I think part of the continuing delay of HL3 is that it's built up such a status that it'll be impossible to actually please anyone. So either the devs are doing everything in their power to try and match expectations, or are delaying it on purpose because they're really not looking forward to how the gaming community is going to collectively shiat themselves when it turns out not to be the second coming of Jesus.
 
2013-09-17 08:32:21 AM  

likefunbutnot: People game on Linux all the goddamned time because Android. That has nothing to do with Valve or its shiatty DRM delivery service.


I'm curious to hear how you find Steam's DRM limiting or confining, save for the fact that you can't make copies of a game for 20,000 of your closest friends?
 
2013-09-17 08:35:28 AM  

NickelP: log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?

This. At best you will get decent hardware support for very specific configurations the steam box uses.


Depends on API development and driver support.  Linux has never had a major entertainment company with close ties to the gaming industry in their corner to help work deals with device OEMs to make their GODDAMN DRIVERS WORK.

I see Valve getting involved as a solid step forward.  If anybody can get AMD and nVidia to finally put some effort into cleaning up their Linux offerings, Valve can.  At least for a specific, custom distro anyway...  In a way, having a laser-like focus on one distro is what gaming on Linux (and the OEMs) needed.  Valve's bringing their milkshake to one specific yard, so let's see how many boys come running.
 
2013-09-17 08:46:44 AM  
Man, I can't wait for the Ouya Steambox. It will be revolutionary because it's a PC in a small, steamy box.
 
2013-09-17 08:50:40 AM  

jayhawk88: I'm curious to hear how you find Steam's DRM limiting or confining, save for the fact that you can't make copies of a game for 20,000 of your closest friends?


Since I can't divorce the games purchased from their software or delivery software, I don't agree to its terms of service. This isn't about piracy but it is about having some measure of control over my purchases. Don't give me any shiat about how "offline mode" operates - it's not sufficiently offline that I never, ever have to authenticate again once a game is installed, so it's not offline enough for me. I'm not playing "mother may I?" to get delivery of a $5, single player, offline Indy game that I could just as easily get from a Humble Bundle without having to deal with Steam's bullshiat.

GoG.com on the other hand is wonderful and works exactly the way I would want a software delivery service to operate.
 
2013-09-17 08:55:59 AM  

likefunbutnot: jayhawk88: I'm curious to hear how you find Steam's DRM limiting or confining, save for the fact that you can't make copies of a game for 20,000 of your closest friends?

Since I can't divorce the games purchased from their software or delivery software, I don't agree to its terms of service. This isn't about piracy but it is about having some measure of control over my purchases. Don't give me any shiat about how "offline mode" operates - it's not sufficiently offline that I never, ever have to authenticate again once a game is installed, so it's not offline enough for me. I'm not playing "mother may I?" to get delivery of a $5, single player, offline Indy game that I could just as easily get from a Humble Bundle without having to deal with Steam's bullshiat.

GoG.com on the other hand is wonderful and works exactly the way I would want a software delivery service to operate.


Directly from Valve:

"Offline Mode is designed to be indefinite. You can't access any of Steam's online features such as friends lists or saved game synchronization, of course, but the client should allow you to run in Offline Mode for as long as you like."

I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.
 
2013-09-17 09:04:10 AM  

Carth: likefunbutnot: jayhawk88: I'm curious to hear how you find Steam's DRM limiting or confining, save for the fact that you can't make copies of a game for 20,000 of your closest friends?

Since I can't divorce the games purchased from their software or delivery software, I don't agree to its terms of service. This isn't about piracy but it is about having some measure of control over my purchases. Don't give me any shiat about how "offline mode" operates - it's not sufficiently offline that I never, ever have to authenticate again once a game is installed, so it's not offline enough for me. I'm not playing "mother may I?" to get delivery of a $5, single player, offline Indy game that I could just as easily get from a Humble Bundle without having to deal with Steam's bullshiat.

GoG.com on the other hand is wonderful and works exactly the way I would want a software delivery service to operate.

Directly from Valve:

"Offline Mode is designed to be indefinite. You can't access any of Steam's online features such as friends lists or saved game synchronization, of course, but the client should allow you to run in Offline Mode for as long as you like."

I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.


Yeah same here, I ran Civ 5 offline for months on my laptop without issue.

I guess I just feel like you have to really be looking to find something about Steam to be mad about.
 
2013-09-17 09:05:35 AM  

xanadian: log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?

And it will continue to be the OS of the future.


The problem is that its an OS for technically adept people, specifically those who are fans of Linux and have invested alot of time in learning it.   To the rank and file its confusing and lacks any real support or features for them.

Yes if you add games and put it into a console format, you'll bring in a few extra fans. But the operating system has to be simplified for that use, which leads to a tablet style "click box for to game" interface that hides any advantages it might have.
What's lacking is a middle ground where it can operate like a big boy OS without being intimidating or hostile to users who came from a windows/mac environment.

/What I think PC games need is developers and hardware makers to agree on a hardware ranking system.
/A1 can play "these games", B2 can crank "those games", and C3 to run "that game", etc...
/A console format is nice but, by nature of being a console, it won't be able to run all of the games for long.
 
2013-09-17 09:07:47 AM  

Carth: likefunbutnot: jayhawk88: I'm curious to hear how you find Steam's DRM limiting or confining, save for the fact that you can't make copies of a game for 20,000 of your closest friends?

Since I can't divorce the games purchased from their software or delivery software, I don't agree to its terms of service. This isn't about piracy but it is about having some measure of control over my purchases. Don't give me any shiat about how "offline mode" operates - it's not sufficiently offline that I never, ever have to authenticate again once a game is installed, so it's not offline enough for me. I'm not playing "mother may I?" to get delivery of a $5, single player, offline Indy game that I could just as easily get from a Humble Bundle without having to deal with Steam's bullshiat.

GoG.com on the other hand is wonderful and works exactly the way I would want a software delivery service to operate.

Directly from Valve:

"Offline Mode is designed to be indefinite. You can't access any of Steam's online features such as friends lists or saved game synchronization, of course, but the client should allow you to run in Offline Mode for as long as you like."

I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.


I've been using Steam for years, and I only go online when I'm downloading something.  I've never had a problem.
 
2013-09-17 09:10:18 AM  

Carth: I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.


I'm absolutely in that small percentage. I've run in to too many edge cases where Steam authentication issues prevented gameplay. Furthermore - and I know you people don't believe this - on the day when Steam stops working, all your purchases are going to go *poof*. I know everyone thinks Valve is going to release some kind of patch that will disable the authentication if that becamse the case, but a decade or so of DRM-laden content delivery service failures suggests that is just never going to happen.

In the mean time, there's GoG and Humble Bundles and a vast library of legacy PC games that aren't shiatty console ports, and I'm perfectly happy playing those things.
 
2013-09-17 09:11:31 AM  

NickelP: log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?

This. At best you will get decent hardware support for very specific configurations the steam box uses.


I'm OK with that. I don't need games to run well on every distro of Linux with every possible hardware configuration - I just need it to run on the one I'm using. If Valve can use its size to push a specific hardware/Linux combination then that will be a viable gaming platform. One thing that makes PC gaming less attractive to many people is buginess vs consoles. Since much of that has to do with not being able to bug test for every of the jillion configurations of hardware (often custom built machines) + Windows version out there a standard gaming PC configuration in the form of a Steam box could largely eliminate that problem.

I'm excited for the Steam box. I signed up for Steam way back in the day, and I have a substantial library. I love the functionality of Steam, and it's pretty much the only place I buy PC games from now.
 
2013-09-17 09:14:26 AM  

jayhawk88: Carth: likefunbutnot: jayhawk88: I'm curious to hear how you find Steam's DRM limiting or confining, save for the fact that you can't make copies of a game for 20,000 of your closest friends?

Since I can't divorce the games purchased from their software or delivery software, I don't agree to its terms of service. This isn't about piracy but it is about having some measure of control over my purchases. Don't give me any shiat about how "offline mode" operates - it's not sufficiently offline that I never, ever have to authenticate again once a game is installed, so it's not offline enough for me. I'm not playing "mother may I?" to get delivery of a $5, single player, offline Indy game that I could just as easily get from a Humble Bundle without having to deal with Steam's bullshiat.

GoG.com on the other hand is wonderful and works exactly the way I would want a software delivery service to operate.

Directly from Valve:

"Offline Mode is designed to be indefinite. You can't access any of Steam's online features such as friends lists or saved game synchronization, of course, but the client should allow you to run in Offline Mode for as long as you like."

I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.

Yeah same here, I ran Civ 5 offline for months on my laptop without issue.

I guess I just feel like you have to really be looking to find something about Steam to be mad about.


I can understand not liking Steam in the sense that you don't like DRM on principle, which I can agree with. But I think it's a fair compromise; they're not limiting how many times you can install or anything particularly restricting like that. GOG is ideal of course, but publishers want some kind of control, and I'd rather have Steam than each one of them doing their own version of Securom.
 
2013-09-17 09:17:40 AM  

jayhawk88: I guess I just feel like you have to really be looking to find something about Steam to be mad about.


Well, there's this:

i.imgur.com

Also, I keep buying games on sale I'm never going to play so there must be some sort of government mind control involved.
 
2013-09-17 09:18:24 AM  

likefunbutnot: on the day when Steam stops working, all your purchases are going to go *poof*.


lol
 
2013-09-17 09:19:21 AM  

likefunbutnot: Carth: I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.

I'm absolutely in that small percentage. I've run in to too many edge cases where Steam authentication issues prevented gameplay. Furthermore - and I know you people don't believe this - on the day when Steam stops working, all your purchases are going to go *poof*. I know everyone thinks Valve is going to release some kind of patch that will disable the authentication if that becamse the case, but a decade or so of DRM-laden content delivery service failures suggests that is just never going to happen.

In the mean time, there's GoG and Humble Bundles and a vast library of legacy PC games that aren't shiatty console ports, and I'm perfectly happy playing those things.


You can test your theory for yourself, except you allegedly don't have Steam to test it with. You can unplug your network cable, to simulate the total failure of Valve's authentication servers. Then attempt to play in offline mode. If it doesn't work, you're right. If it does work, you're wrong. I have serious doubts that you will ever undertake such a simple test, because no one likes to be as wrong as you obviously are.
 
2013-09-17 09:32:57 AM  

untaken_name: likefunbutnot: Carth: I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.

I'm absolutely in that small percentage. I've run in to too many edge cases where Steam authentication issues prevented gameplay. Furthermore - and I know you people don't believe this - on the day when Steam stops working, all your purchases are going to go *poof*. I know everyone thinks Valve is going to release some kind of patch that will disable the authentication if that becamse the case, but a decade or so of DRM-laden content delivery service failures suggests that is just never going to happen.

In the mean time, there's GoG and Humble Bundles and a vast library of legacy PC games that aren't shiatty console ports, and I'm perfectly happy playing those things.

You can test your theory for yourself, except you allegedly don't have Steam to test it with. You can unplug your network cable, to simulate the total failure of Valve's authentication servers. Then attempt to play in offline mode. If it doesn't work, you're right. If it does work, you're wrong. I have serious doubts that you will ever undertake such a simple test, because no one likes to be as wrong as you obviously are.


The problems most of us had with DRM were offline modes, having it readily available on multiple devices, buggyness, headaches in authenticating, and them attaching spyware.  Steam solved most of these and they provide a good service in my opinion.  Most of the folks left biatching are the ones that just don't want to pay for anything but won't admit that.
 
2013-09-17 09:39:58 AM  

likefunbutnot: on the day when Steam stops working, all your purchases are going to go *poof*.


It is far more likely that on the day Steam stops working it will be in permanent offline mode. I'm ok with that for the convenience and benefits steam offers.
 
2013-09-17 09:44:19 AM  

untaken_name: You can test your theory for yourself, except you allegedly don't have Steam to test it with. You can unplug your network cable, to simulate the total failure of Valve's authentication servers.


That's not entirely true. You have to authenticate the first time the game launches, THEN you can play in offline mode. One of my earliest experiences with Steam was of downloading a game overnight then not being able to play it the next day because the damn cable was out. It's very frustrating being unable to play a purely offline game because your internet connection isn't working and since it was one of my first experiences with the service I wound up ignoring Steam for years after that. Didn't start buying stuff from Valve again until last summer, in fact.

My tolerance for unplayability as the result of DRM is basically zero.
 
2013-09-17 09:45:12 AM  

log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?


Yeah, it's not like millions of people are carrying around a Linux machine in their pocket or their purse or anything.
 
2013-09-17 09:51:08 AM  

skozlaw: untaken_name: You can test your theory for yourself, except you allegedly don't have Steam to test it with. You can unplug your network cable, to simulate the total failure of Valve's authentication servers.

That's not entirely true. You have to authenticate the first time the game launches, THEN you can play in offline mode. One of my earliest experiences with Steam was of downloading a game overnight then not being able to play it the next day because the damn cable was out. It's very frustrating being unable to play a purely offline game because your internet connection isn't working and since it was one of my first experiences with the service I wound up ignoring Steam for years after that. Didn't start buying stuff from Valve again until last summer, in fact.

My tolerance for unplayability as the result of DRM is basically zero.


Tell me about it. I still remember buying an SNES game and being pissed off when I got home and not being able to play it because power was out. It was a miserable 4 hours.
 
2013-09-17 09:54:44 AM  
xria
... can release games when they are ready

Yes, "when it's ready" has proven to be a successful model

2.bp.blogspot.com

// in both profit and game quality.
 
2013-09-17 09:54:55 AM  
Carth:

I've been running in offline mode for 2 months now without a problem just to see if it really was bugged at 2 weeks like some people claimed. No problems yet. If that isn't long enough for you that's fine but you're probably in the 1% of gamers that take issue with it.

I love Steam for its convenience, but Offline mode fails for me after about a week, and I have to go back online. I haven't messed with it enough to know for sure, but it seems like if I open a game, I'm fine, but if I open Steam, even without connecting, I lose my offline credentials and can not play my games anymore until I reconnect. Thankfully my phone also works as a convenient wireless NIC when needed. I'm glad it works for you but it is not good enough yet.
 
2013-09-17 09:57:19 AM  

likefunbutnot: on the day when Steam stops working, all your purchases are going to go *poof*


A lot of Steam games, especially the smaller ones, will actually run without Steam. Just find the .exe file in the folder.
 
2013-09-17 10:02:38 AM  

way south: xanadian: log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?

And it will continue to be the OS of the future.

The problem is that its an OS for technically adept people, specifically those who are fans of Linux and have invested alot of time in learning it.   To the rank and file its confusing and lacks any real support or features for them.

Yes if you add games and put it into a console format, you'll bring in a few extra fans. But the operating system has to be simplified for that use, which leads to a tablet style "click box for to game" interface that hides any advantages it might have.
What's lacking is a middle ground where it can operate like a big boy OS without being intimidating or hostile to users who came from a windows/mac environment.


Hey, maybe you could look into this new OS called Android.  I'm told it's quite simplified. [/sarcasm]

Seriously, have you tried Ubuntu or Mint lately?  How about Elementary OS?  A normal computer user can go a long time, as long or longer than with Windows, before they have to ring up their One True Nerd buddy to bail their ass out.

I'm intrigued by Steam's pre-nouncement - it'll be interesting to see what they've got up their sleeve.
 
2013-09-17 10:03:09 AM  

way south: xanadian: log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?

And it will continue to be the OS of the future.

The problem is that its an OS for technically adept people, specifically those who are fans of Linux and have invested alot of time in learning it.   To the rank and file its confusing and lacks any real support or features for them.

Yes if you add games and put it into a console format, you'll bring in a few extra fans. But the operating system has to be simplified for that use, which leads to a tablet style "click box for to game" interface that hides any advantages it might have.
What's lacking is a middle ground where it can operate like a big boy OS without being intimidating or hostile to users who came from a windows/mac environment.


I've worked with/in all three OSes pretty extensively. I currently have a large linux workstation at work that I use directly and remotely constantly. But it is a dual quad-core, 50GB of RAM, 3TB of storage computing platform. I was using Linux for my personal laptop as well but last year made the switch over to a MacBook and love it. Solid UNIX platform with a nice windowing environment on top and support for productivity software everyone uses. When I have to be able to writer manuscripts collaboratively with colleagues, manage reference lists, generate reports in excel format, etc nothing beats actually having Office at your fingertips. Not because the Office suite is better than other options, but because it is what everyone else is using.

I think modern linux distributions like Ubuntu and Mint have made huge stride forwards in terms of usability "out of the box", I've rarely had to do much, if any, configuration after the fact to get all the basic stuff working on a modern PC with linux. But there is a lot of room for improvement. I would like to see a solid distribution that is basically like OS X. Totally usable out of the box "just works" with a nice fairly familiar environment on top while still having access to all the command line power and glory under the hood if you want it.
 
2013-09-17 10:03:36 AM  
you have linux if you have:

Raspberry Pi
Chromebook
Android Phone
BMW
International Space Station

Ubuntu 12.04.2 is a very good distro of Linux and one that I use extensively. Over the past two years, I've convinced more than 100 (about 60%) people at my institution (education) to switch over from Windows, and probably over 400 students under 18.

Advantages: very fast, immune to most viruses/malware, FREE, 20 minute reformat and reinstall from USB with 3 minute set up time, stable, installation of apps doesn't involve clicking a lot of crap (command line), very attractive, easy to use. basically you can make a poor man's mac out of any computer less than 6 years old. but better.

as an example, here is how I install adobe flash (although in 12.04.2 it is installed by default)... I type in terminal:

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11

that's it. no clicking, no sneaky ask toolbar, no searching on the web. and it's done in 36 seconds.

Linux is very easy to use. the problem is that most people have become so accustomed to Microsoft Office (of all things). fortunately, libre office and google docs are very good replacements.
 
2013-09-17 10:06:05 AM  

way south: xanadian: log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?

And it will continue to be the OS of the future.

The problem is that its an OS for technically adept people, specifically those who are fans of Linux and have invested alot of time in learning it.   To the rank and file its confusing and lacks any real support or features for them.

Yes if you add games and put it into a console format, you'll bring in a few extra fans. But the operating system has to be simplified for that use, which leads to a tablet style "click box for to game" interface that hides any advantages it might have.
What's lacking is a middle ground where it can operate like a big boy OS without being intimidating or hostile to users who came from a windows/mac environment.

/What I think PC games need is developers and hardware makers to agree on a hardware ranking system.
/A1 can play "these games", B2 can crank "those games", and C3 to run "that game", etc...
/A console format is nice but, by nature of being a console, it won't be able to run all of the games for long.


Last I heard, Steambox was going to be upgradable, is that no longer true? Part of the appeal is/was not having to buy a new box every 3-5 years, just adding/swapping memory and cards
 
2013-09-17 10:10:51 AM  

duenor: you have linux if you have:


sudo apt-get install flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11

that's it. no clicking, no sneaky ask toolbar, no searching on the web. and it's done in 36 seconds.

Linux is very easy to use. the problem is that most people have become so accustomed to Microsoft Office (of all things). fortunately, libre office and google docs are very good replacements.


This is where your evangelism failed.  Asking anyone to go to the command line is dumb, no matter how simple the command is.  And its unnecessary in modern Linux distributions.  For example, in Ubuntu which I also use, you click "Software Center" on the left hand side, type "flash" in the search box, and hit Install next to the first search result.

Easier than installing an application off the web in Windows or Mac (and this is how you install 99% of your software), one click to get it installed, and no command line.

/Package management ftw
 
2013-09-17 10:11:43 AM  

duenor: as an example, here is how I install adobe flash (although in 12.04.2 it is installed by default)... I type in terminal:

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11


That's great if you know exactly what to do.  Good teaching your mom* how to look that up.

I used to dual boot but I can't see myself ever running Linux natively on a desktop or laptop again any time soon.  I'll just virtualize it when I want to dick around with something, it's not like I'm short on RAM.

*assuming she's not a greybeard herself
 
2013-09-17 10:12:53 AM  
The problem I've experienced with offline mode has happened the few times internet service was down. As I usually have steam in online mode, when the internet went down, I lost the ability to effectively switch modes and was locked out of playing...
 
2013-09-17 10:16:10 AM  
Linux has been the future ever since Windows appeared... Just delayed 15-20 years by MacroShiat!
 
2013-09-17 10:19:11 AM  

ipsofacto: The problem I've experienced with offline mode has happened the few times internet service was down. As I usually have steam in online mode, when the internet went down, I lost the ability to effectively switch modes and was locked out of playing...


Weird.  When my internet service has gone down, all I've had to do is restart Steam, and it automatically starts in offline mode.
 
2013-09-17 10:22:06 AM  
you have pee hands:
I used to dual boot but I can't see myself ever running Linux natively on a desktop or laptop again any time soon.  I'll just virtualize it when I want to dick around with something, it's not like I'm short on RAM.

Funny, I do it the other way around.  I've got one or two things my employer uses that are strictly Windows, so I run it as a guest (VM) on my Ubuntu laptop.
 
2013-09-17 10:28:19 AM  
Actually, this is all well and good, but we're really glossing over the big issue here--how will the PC Master Race Neckbeards cope with people using controllers for PC gaming?

With the large number of console gamers migrating (back) to PC, this is already causing problems among the PC Master Race rank and file.  If the SteamBox takes off and we see a certain FPS title with full controller support, they're going to riot.
 
2013-09-17 10:29:02 AM  

duenor: you have linux if you have:

Raspberry Pi
Chromebook
Android Phone
BMW
International Space Station

Ubuntu 12.04.2 is a very good distro of Linux and one that I use extensively. Over the past two years, I've convinced more than 100 (about 60%) people at my institution (education) to switch over from Windows, and probably over 400 students under 18.

Advantages: very fast, immune to most viruses/malware, FREE, 20 minute reformat and reinstall from USB with 3 minute set up time, stable, installation of apps doesn't involve clicking a lot of crap (command line), very attractive, easy to use. basically you can make a poor man's mac out of any computer less than 6 years old. but better.

as an example, here is how I install adobe flash (although in 12.04.2 it is installed by default)... I type in terminal:

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11

that's it. no clicking, no sneaky ask toolbar, no searching on the web. and it's done in 36 seconds.

Linux is very easy to use. the problem is that most people have become so accustomed to Microsoft Office (of all things). fortunately, libre office and google docs are very good replacements.


The point of a good GUI is not having to leave it to do simple tasks - in other words, you just came across as a fan boy that doesn't get it.

Note - I'm not disagreeing with what you say technically; as an IT professional I think Linux is awesome, even if I make my living off Microsoft. But, you are not thinking like or examining the perspective of Joe End User.
 
2013-09-17 10:30:03 AM  
Until Linux can get its shiat together enough so that it's not a bloody chore to install drivers for video cards and peripherals or other necessary software it's not going to be replacing the PC as a gaming platform. The minute you have to ask your users to go to a command line to do something that's easily done with a click in Windows, you've lost them. As a friend of mine used to say "Linux is very user friendly, it's just picky about its friends."
 
2013-09-17 10:31:07 AM  

duenor: as an example, here is how I install adobe flash (although in 12.04.2 it is installed by default)... I type in terminal:

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11

that's it. no clicking, no sneaky ask toolbar, no searching on the web. and it's done in 36 seconds.


That's so completely intuitive, it's a wonder that everyone's not doing it!

Of COURSE the flash installer is going to be "flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11". HOW COULD IT POSSIBLY BE ANYTHING ELSE?
 
2013-09-17 10:34:06 AM  

log_jammin: Linux has been "the future" for...15 years now? 20?


Bwhahahahahahaha!

Linux is now, if your web servers, database servers, etc... are not running virtualized Linux on cluster blades in two geographically diverse hardened data centers then I pity you.

I keep lobbying for a Linux desktop for my development environment, but the dam upper management just has to have their retarded Windows. Even though we could do a GUI on top of LInux with a suite of office tools and they would never be able to tell the difference. It's not like they use their desktops except as an overly powerful web browser.
 
2013-09-17 10:34:09 AM  

waterrockets: Yeah, it's not like millions of people are carrying around a Linux machine in their pocket or their purse or anything.


I drive a car everyday. that doesn't make me a mechanic.
 
2013-09-17 10:35:25 AM  

Slaves2Darkness: I keep lobbying for a Linux desktop for my development environment, but


like i said.
 
2013-09-17 10:41:49 AM  

Carousel Beast: as an example, here is how I install adobe flash (although in 12.04.2 it is installed by default)... I type in terminal:

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-installer gsfonts x-11


You do realise that's the entire reason GUIs were invented, so normal people don't have to look at a command prompt.
 
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