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(Daily Mail)   Highly respected British journal commissions the most important study of our time. 'Warm egg' deniers outraged, insist conclusion is a bad yolk - politicians laying low in issue   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 18
    More: Silly, food programme, ambient temperature, egg yolks, Bristol University, food poisoning, Navy man  
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1767 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Sep 2013 at 12:43 PM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-16 12:55:36 PM
That was egg sighting.

"Paging Mr Bumin.  Al Bumin...."
 
2013-09-16 01:00:31 PM
I don't know about eggs, but i keep neither peanut butter or jelly in the fridge.   And i once broke up with a gal for putting honey in there.
 
2013-09-16 01:04:23 PM
Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.
 
2013-09-16 01:20:01 PM

Cyno01: Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.


French people don't keep their eggs in the fridge, you're not seeing massive outbreaks of disease there.  Salmonella is effected by cooking, not by refrigeration.  .
 
2013-09-16 01:30:10 PM

stuhayes2010: Cyno01: Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.

French people don't keep their eggs in the fridge, you're not seeing massive outbreaks of disease there.  Salmonella is effected by cooking, not by refrigeration.  .


The eggs at the grocery store aren't refrigerated, no.  I can't speak to anyone else, but I put them in the fridge when I get home, because I grew up in the States and it's habit.

But I can assure you that not everyone here cooks their eggs hard and dry - we like runny yolks on our breakfast toast quite a bit.  And there's a lot of sauces used in French cuisine that start with a raw egg yolk.  That, to me, says that Salmonella just isn't as prevalent in poultry farms here, whether through vaccination, better conditions, both, or something else.

/I don't know, I'm not a poultry farmer
 
2013-09-16 01:51:10 PM

stuhayes2010: Cyno01: Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.

French people don't keep their eggs in the fridge, you're not seeing massive outbreaks of disease there.  Salmonella is effected by cooking, not by refrigeration.  .


If salmonella is present inside an egg, it will grow if unrefrigerated. Then if you consume the egg undercooked (which happens in many many preparations), the bacterial load is high enough that it can more easily cause an infection. I dont recall if this applies to salmonella, but if food has a high enough bacterial presence, even if cooked to kill the bacteria, toxins left behind can still make someone ill.

Lets say salmonella is present in 5% of eggs, but in quantities low enough that any normal immune system would be able to handle no problem. For sake of numbers lets say they contain 1000 salmonella bacteria each and the threshold of making an average (non immunocompromised) person ill is 10000000, both numbers are pulled out of my ass though, im not an immunologist. You keep those infected eggs refrigerated, the salmonella is dormant so to speak and doesnt multiply, so the fresh infected eggs and the week old refrigerated infected eggs are both still at ~1000 bacteria and safe to eat.

In a suitable environment at a hospitable temperature with lots of food (like all the stuff inside an egg), salmonella can double every ~30 minutes. So that egg with 1000 salmonella in it, after a day unrefrigerated could have 140737488355328000 bacteria in it, even if cooking destroys 99.99% of that bacteria, its still enough for your average person to become ill. Again, the numbers were pulled out of my ass, but just because its safe in the EU, where they vaccinate chickens against salmonella and will dispose of infected flocks, doesnt mean its safe to do in the US where farmers dont give a fark because the onus for food safety is on the preparer.
 
2013-09-16 02:01:22 PM

stuhayes2010: Cyno01: Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.

French people don't keep their eggs in the fridge, you're not seeing massive outbreaks of disease there.  Salmonella is effected by cooking, not by refrigeration.  .


Is it possible that their egg farms are slightly less disgusting than American ones?  Because, as I understand it, that's our main problem with salmonella in eggs.
 
2013-09-16 02:02:11 PM
But are you supposed to crack the small end or the big end? Smart people want to know!
 
2013-09-16 02:10:18 PM

Abner Doon: stuhayes2010: Cyno01: Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.

French people don't keep their eggs in the fridge, you're not seeing massive outbreaks of disease there.  Salmonella is effected by cooking, not by refrigeration.  .

Is it possible that their egg farms are slightly less disgusting than American ones?  Because, as I understand it, that's our main problem with salmonella in eggs.


Sorta. When it comes to salmonella contamination of eggs, were talking about two different things, contamination on the shell, which is generally from unsanitary conditions, but eggs are washed pretty well during processing, so its not a huge concern unless youre just smashing eggs and picking the shells out of something you plan to eat raw. Properly cracked eggs wont come into contact with the outer shell much, and even if they do, assuming youre cooking it at least a bit shortly after, its really not a big deal. The real concern is contamination of the egg itself which happens inside an infected chicken.

http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/salmonella.htm

Also during the big outbreak last year i read somewhere that vaccinating chickens would add something like a nickel to the price of a carton of eggs, but since its not mandated theres no real incentive for farmers to do so.
 
2013-09-16 02:17:26 PM

stuhayes2010: Cyno01: Thats fine in countries that vaccinate chickens against salmonella.

French people don't keep their eggs in the fridge, you're not seeing massive outbreaks of disease there.  Salmonella is effected by cooking, not by refrigeration.  .


You overcook your eggs.
 
2013-09-16 03:24:29 PM
Wanted for questioning:

dvdmedia.ign.com
 
2013-09-16 03:42:49 PM
"c" is not a unit of temperature.  You're a damned newspaper; you should be able to figure out how to type °C.

/dealing with unit issues today
//SI should be good enough for anyone
 
2013-09-16 03:45:28 PM
You could also home-pasteurize your eggs. 75 minutes at 135F should be good for a log6 reduction., and it's well below coagulation temperature.
 
2013-09-16 03:53:05 PM
My wife gets after me for not putting ketchup in the fridge either. I tell her it largely made from vinegar, which is a preservative. I complain to her about leaving the toilet seat down.
 
2013-09-16 04:33:46 PM

T.rex: I don't know about eggs, but i keep neither peanut butter or jelly in the fridge.   And i once broke up with a gal for putting honey in there.


You definitely do not need to put honey in the 'fridge.  Most jelly/jam I've seen says refrigerate after opening. I've never seen this on peanut butter.

As for eggs, I often keep them way past their expiration date and their kept in the 'fridge which does not have that silly thing in the door that holds eggs.

I also think the Mail's commissioned study is pretty useless.  What constitutes "2 batches"?  Why only 2 weeks?  As I've said it sometimes takes me months to finish off a carton of 12 eggs.

I'll continue keeping mine cold, besides where else would I putt them?  The pantry is already full and I sure don't want them cluttering up the counter.
 
2013-09-16 05:00:47 PM
When I'm wanting eggs for breakfast I set them out overnight. Room temperature eggs cook better in the pan.
 
2013-09-16 10:07:44 PM
There's a lot of things you don't have to keep in the fridge, but it's not like it's going to hurt to put them in there. Of course, this is a British news site, those guys have those small hotel room sized fridges in most homes over there so maybe they need to conserve as much space as they can.
 
2013-09-17 08:37:09 AM
i.dailymail.co.uk

I am overwhelmed with a need to see this lil guy animated, like his legs are walking.

And it needs to be set to "Stayin' Alive".
 
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