If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NPR)   Pink isn't just for girls - it's also for battleships   (npr.org) divider line 39
    More: Spiffy, Roy G. Biv, Rachel Martin  
•       •       •

5942 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Sep 2013 at 10:00 AM (52 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-16 10:04:07 AM
Hahahaha, the liberal plans for the Navy secretly contained in ending DADT, and allowing women in combat have succeeded.

//I'm aware of the year it actually happened.
 
2013-09-16 10:09:21 AM
...and submarines!
 
2013-09-16 10:09:24 AM
Cary Grant, Tony Curtis all wanted for questioning...

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-09-16 10:10:26 AM

Jodeo: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis all wanted for questioning...

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 850x520]


Thread over.

/well-done!
 
2013-09-16 10:12:11 AM
Pinkish-purple sky at night, sailor's de... OH MY GOD, IT'S THE BRITISH!!
 
2013-09-16 10:14:54 AM
Cue the Village People singing, "In the Navy".
 
2013-09-16 10:15:43 AM
Wait, we've developed the S.E.P field?  Why didn't I notice!?
 
2013-09-16 10:28:04 AM
came for operation petticoat reference. left satisfied.
 
2013-09-16 10:29:54 AM
I don't get the front of the book. Red, Orange, Yellow, Green and Blue make sense. But then there is Dark Blue and Purple... Why the I and the V?

/ALL men see in only 16 colors, like Windows default settings.
//Peach, for example, is a fruit, not a color.
///Pumpkin is also a fruit.
//We have no idea what mauve is
/Old joke is old
 
2013-09-16 10:37:12 AM

DerAppie: I don't get the front of the book. Red, Orange, Yellow, Green and Blue make sense. But then there is Dark Blue and Purple... Why the I and the V?


Indigo is blue to me, but to discount violet is just weird.
 
2013-09-16 10:51:59 AM

gnosis301: DerAppie: I don't get the front of the book. Red, Orange, Yellow, Green and Blue make sense. But then there is Dark Blue and Purple... Why the I and the V?

Indigo is blue to me, but to discount violet is just weird.


A violet is a small purple flower.
 
2013-09-16 10:54:22 AM

DerAppie: I don't get the front of the book. Red, Orange, Yellow, Green and Blue make sense. But then there is Dark Blue and Purple... Why the I and the V?



According to TFA's audio, don't know if it made it to the text transcript; when Newton discovered the spectrum, there was pressure to make it 7 colors, so it would match up with the 7 notes of the musical scale.
 
2013-09-16 11:01:35 AM
FTFA:"n Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "

Can anyone explain this to me, please? I feel like I'm missing half the paragraph here, somehow.
 
2013-09-16 11:05:53 AM
FTFA: I'd always been fascinated by color. When I was really little, I was fascinated with this book called Color Me Beautiful and it was basically a guide to help choosing the best colors for your skin tone.

My sisters lived by that book when I was a kid.
Apparently, I'm a Winter.
 
2013-09-16 11:08:25 AM
Somebody Else's Problem field, or  SEP, is a cheap, easy, and staggeringly useful way of safely protecting something from unwanted eyes. It can run almost indefinitely on a flashlight/9 volt battery, and is able to do so because it utilizes a person's natural tendency to ignore things they don't easily accept, like, for example, aliens at a cricket match. Any object around which a S.E.P is applied will cease to be noticed, because any problems one may have understanding it (and therefore accepting its existence) become Somebody Else's. An object becomes not so much invisible as unnoticed.
 
2013-09-16 11:13:47 AM

Jodeo: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis all wanted for questioning...

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 850x520]


We just sunk a truck!
 
2013-09-16 11:14:05 AM
Roy G Biv?

Shennanigan.

Vib-gy-or is easier to remember.
 
2013-09-16 11:24:02 AM

Smoking GNU: FTFA:"n Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "

Can anyone explain this to me, please? I feel like I'm missing half the paragraph here, somehow.


Not sure why, it makes perfect sense to me. And of course it is neither green nor blue, it is half way between them (so calling it blue is at least as valid as calling it green). Obviously the reason is the most common color blindness is red/green, so using red and green would be the worst possible combination for safety reasons (well apart from making them red and red or whatever)..
 
2013-09-16 11:29:39 AM

Smoking GNU: FTFA:"n Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "

Can anyone explain this to me, please? I feel like I'm missing half the paragraph here, somehow.


The Japanese word for green, "midori" has only a recent history of use.  The word "aoi" has been used to describe both green and blue with context being the arbiter of the color.
 
2013-09-16 11:31:48 AM

gnosis301: Smoking GNU: FTFA:"n Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "

Can anyone explain this to me, please? I feel like I'm missing half the paragraph here, somehow.

The Japanese word for green, "midori" has only a recent history of use.  The word "aoi" has been used to describe both green and blue with context being the arbiter of the color.


Ok, that clears it up somewhat.
 
2013-09-16 11:32:14 AM

Jodeo: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis all wanted for questioning...

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 850x520]


Good see that so early in the thread.

Smoking GNU: FTFA:"n Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "

Can anyone explain this to me, please? I feel like I'm missing half the paragraph here, somehow.


The word the Japanese use for a "green" light is "aoi" (青い), which is used normally in Japanese to mean blue. However, the greenlight of Japanese traffic lights is in fact green, same as America (or the UK). There are other occasions when "Aoi" is used to mean "green", such as in supermarkets, where "seika" 青果 refers to the section selling vegetables and fruit, in other words the greengrocery section.
The explanation I heard from one of my Japanese teachers many years ago (so I may have remembered this incorrectly) is that the character for "aoi", 青, originally meant "blue" in China, whence it came to Japan.
 
2013-09-16 11:35:56 AM
Here's the wikitionary page with the explanation of the Chinese character 青:
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%9D%92
 
2013-09-16 11:36:04 AM

Smoking GNU: FTFA:"n Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "

Can anyone explain this to me, please? I feel like I'm missing half the paragraph here, somehow.


It's just a quirk of the language.  The Japanese word for "blue" actually has a more diverse meaning than the other colors, or American understanding of them.  There is a word for "green", but you actually use the word for blue when a signal turns green.  The green light of the signal itself is the exact same green color American traffic lights use.

I'm not an etymologist but I believe the root of this usage comes from an alternate meaning -- the word for "blue" also means "unripe" for some reason*, when referring to fruit.  Many unripe fruit are green, so the word for blue actually has connotations of both change AND the color green.  In that context, calling a green signal "blue" makes sense.  But this particular quirk is unique to this word; it doesn't signify anything else.

*That may not seem like much, but the "unripe" meaning is strong enough that "blue" is also used to describe someone inexperienced ("rookie") without any reference to color whatsoever.
 
2013-09-16 11:38:25 AM
As an aside, the blue/green distinction (and lack thereof) is a worldwide phenomenon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinction_of_blue_and_green_in_various _ languages
 
2013-09-16 12:11:51 PM

gnosis301: As an aside, the blue/green distinction (and lack thereof) is a worldwide phenomenon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinction_of_blue_and_green_in_various _ languages


Fascinating. Though I wonder why it is green/blue that seems to be the combo that get lumped together. To my eyes green/yellow don't show as much visual distinction as green/blue does.
 
2013-09-16 12:31:52 PM
rymimg.com
Knows a little something about colors.
 
2013-09-16 12:37:28 PM
nowiknow.com
 
2013-09-16 12:40:45 PM
"in Japan, you wait at a stoplight until it turns from red to blue, even though it's the same green color as American stoplights. "   My mind has been blown.
 
2013-09-16 12:50:45 PM
I learned Roy G. Biv from playing Paranoia
 
2013-09-16 12:51:05 PM

gnosis301: As an aside, the blue/green distinction (and lack thereof) is a worldwide phenomenon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinction_of_blue_and_green_in_various _ languages


Huh... learn something new everyday.

I guess Grue mean Go.
 
2013-09-16 12:53:46 PM

DerAppie: //We have no idea what mauve is


www.medicalmarcom.com
 
2013-09-16 03:26:05 PM

WelldeadLink: DerAppie: //We have no idea what mauve is

[www.medicalmarcom.com image 300x300]


If Maude ever catches you she'll beat you until a nice shade of mauve.
 
2013-09-16 04:00:37 PM

Luse: WelldeadLink: DerAppie: //We have no idea what mauve is

[www.medicalmarcom.com image 300x300]

If Maude ever catches you she'll beat you until a nice shade of mauve.


You know who else liked mauve?

24.media.tumblr.com

Delia Deetz, that's who.
 
2013-09-16 04:46:03 PM

dittybopper: Luse: WelldeadLink: DerAppie: //We have no idea what mauve is

[www.medicalmarcom.com image 300x300]

If Maude ever catches you she'll beat you until a nice shade of mauve.

You know who else liked mauve?

[24.media.tumblr.com image 245x203]

Delia Deetz, that's who.


"You read my mind"
 
2013-09-16 04:54:29 PM

Guadior42: Jodeo: Cary Grant, Tony Curtis all wanted for questioning...

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 850x520]

Thread over.

/well-done!


Yep.  Came of "Operation Petticoat," leaving satisfied
 
2013-09-16 06:28:37 PM
Late to the party as always.  ROYGBIV
 
2013-09-16 08:02:57 PM
Don't forget resistor color bands: BBROYGBVGW

The saying used to help remember:
Bad
Boys
Ravish
Our
Young
Girls
But
Violet
Gives
Willingly

www.michaels-electronics-lessons.com
 
2013-09-16 09:22:56 PM

Dinjiin: Don't forget resistor color bands: BBROYGBVGW

The saying used to help remember:
Bad
Boys
Ravish
Our
Young
Girls
But
Violet
Gives
Willingly


You said rape twice
I like rape

learned in the military
 
2013-09-17 01:41:10 AM

Slives: gnosis301: As an aside, the blue/green distinction (and lack thereof) is a worldwide phenomenon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinction_of_blue_and_green_in_various _ languages

Fascinating. Though I wonder why it is green/blue that seems to be the combo that get lumped together. To my eyes green/yellow don't show as much visual distinction as green/blue does.


That's quite literally true (that 'to your eyes' there is less distinction between green and yellow than between green and blue). The three types of cones in the human eye respond best to wavelengths corresponding to red, green, and blue. Yellow sets off a combination of red and green cones.

www.todayifoundout.com

/cognitive science major
//also a probable tetrachromat - which is the opposite of red/green colorblind
 
Displayed 39 of 39 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report