If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   Scientists discover flies avoid being swatted because they perceive time as moving slower, much like Neo dodging bullets in the Matrix. Followup study to focus on rarely seen fly rave orgies   (theguardian.com) divider line 26
    More: Interesting, scientists, metabolic rates, visual systems, matrix, PhD student, University of St Andrews, insects, natural sciences  
•       •       •

1356 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Sep 2013 at 9:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-16 09:27:51 AM
Well, that may disprove the theory that they were using The Force.
 
2013-09-16 09:43:14 AM
Fine, but their hearing is atrocious. Just use a vacuum cleaner and the fly just sits there with its wings folding in the wind until its legs can't hold it in place anymore.
 
2013-09-16 09:54:28 AM
I've been postulating this for years. This is why birds can fly in such tight formation.

The reason why this must happen is because time is so connected with mass. You know how your mass approaches infinity the faster you go (becoming infiniste at light speed)? This means the smaller you are, the faster you perceive time.
 
2013-09-16 09:59:45 AM
Huh?
If they perceived time as moving slower wouldn't they be hit more? Something perceiving time slower would actually be receiving less input and fewer clues that a fly swatter was incoming than someone who perceives time faster. It would have less time to react not more. To achieve the Bullet Time effect ofdodging bullets you want to speed up your perceptions and reactions to the speed of the bullets or faster.
 
2013-09-16 10:02:14 AM
'zactly
 
2013-09-16 10:20:33 AM
Er, didn't we already know this? We knew that they fly between raindrops, didn't we?
 
2013-09-16 10:23:25 AM
Also, notice most fly swatters are an open mesh? You can literally blow it out of the way with the pressure wave from your hand (shoe, etc.).
 
2013-09-16 10:25:52 AM
FTA: "It's tempting to think that for children time moves more slowly than it does for grownups, and there is some evidence that it might," he said.

My theory on this is that relative to the amount of time a child has been alive, a minute/day/years is much much longer than the same amount of time for an adult. To a 5 year old, a single year is 20% of their entire span of existence, maybe 50% of their cognizant existence. The same year to a 50 year old is about 2%. Thus, the child's year takes forever, relative to what they have to base it against.
 
2013-09-16 10:26:44 AM

Slaves2Darkness: Huh?
If they perceived time as moving slower wouldn't they be hit more? Something perceiving time slower would actually be receiving less input and fewer clues that a fly swatter was incoming than someone who perceives time faster. It would have less time to react not more. To achieve the Bullet Time effect ofdodging bullets you want to speed up your perceptions and reactions to the speed of the bullets or faster.


It's relative. If you perceive time as moving slower, it doesn't mean you are just as slow. It's like Quicksilver (Marvel's Flash) from the X-men. He's an asshole and it's been said that he is an asshole because he perceives time moving slower everywhere around him all the time. He had a  quote along the lines of the speed of the world around him is agonizingly slow to him. Picture having to wait in a slow-moving line for hours for something mundane. That's what every single second is like for him.
 
2013-09-16 10:27:54 AM
Ha, I wrote a theory article on this exact topic about 5 years ago in 1000 level class.  Specifically, that time could be experienced at different internal speeds, and rather than something having 'quicker' or 'slower' reflexes, they literally move experience time at a different rate.  Instructor thought it was ridiculous.
 
2013-09-16 10:55:12 AM

MagSeven: It's relative. If you perceive time as moving slower, it doesn't mean you are just as slow. It's like Quicksilver (Marvel's Flash) from the X-men. He's an asshole and it's been said that he is an asshole because he perceives time moving slower everywhere around him all the time. He had a  quote along the lines of the speed of the world around him is agonizingly slow to him. Picture having to wait in a slow-moving line for hours for something mundane. That's what every single second is like for him.



Now this totally explains why mosquitos are such DICKS.
 
2013-09-16 11:59:38 AM
Who's Your
ww1.prweb.com
Daddy?

 
2013-09-16 01:43:28 PM
So they sense the world in smaller increments.
Which seems fair since their lifespans are in smaller increments.

Got to make the best of everything.

/also makes sense why Grey Elves are so out there...
 
2013-09-16 02:23:40 PM

Parallax: I've been postulating this for years. This is why birds can fly in such tight formation.

The reason why this must happen is because time is so connected with mass. You know how your mass approaches infinity the faster you go (becoming infiniste at light speed)? This means the smaller you are, the faster you perceive time.


It has nothing to do with mass. It DOES help that smaller animals have shorter neural pathways, since electrical impulses don't travel instantaneously.
 
2013-09-16 02:23:57 PM

rogue49: So they sense the world in smaller increments.
Which seems fair since their lifespans are in smaller increments.

Got to make the best of everything.

/also makes sense why Grey Elves are so out there...


Yeah, I'd be curious as to whether it's a function of size or of life span. There's those giant tortoises that can live for a century, but they're a lot smaller than an elephant that lives 60-70 years. It'd be interesting to see if the elephant has a faster or slower perception of time. Would the elephant's size predict the results, or the tortoise's lifespan?
 
2013-09-16 02:30:29 PM

Slaves2Darkness: Huh?
If they perceived time as moving slower wouldn't they be hit more? Something perceiving time slower would actually be receiving less input and fewer clues that a fly swatter was incoming than someone who perceives time faster. It would have less time to react not more. To achieve the Bullet Time effect ofdodging bullets you want to speed up your perceptions and reactions to the speed of the bullets or faster.


"Slower rate of perception" != "perceiving time as moving more slowly".

The more rapidly your neurons fire, the more slowly time seems to pass. In addition, the perception of time is extremely elastic, and is based in part on the formation of short-term memories.
 
2013-09-16 02:37:45 PM

phyrkrakr: rogue49: So they sense the world in smaller increments.
Which seems fair since their lifespans are in smaller increments.

Got to make the best of everything.

/also makes sense why Grey Elves are so out there...

Yeah, I'd be curious as to whether it's a function of size or of life span. There's those giant tortoises that can live for a century, but they're a lot smaller than an elephant that lives 60-70 years. It'd be interesting to see if the elephant has a faster or slower perception of time. Would the elephant's size predict the results, or the tortoise's lifespan?


The research I've read indicates that life span isn't a factor in the perception of time's passage (i.e. the length of the "now"), but it can affect judgments about duration and waiting (i.e. how long it will take to complete a task, or how "far away" an event is in the future).
 
2013-09-16 03:03:46 PM
Isn't that just the flip side of "they have faster reactions and movement speed"?
 
2013-09-16 03:10:52 PM
 
2013-09-16 03:11:49 PM
Yes, that fly lives its entire life in what we perceive as a few days. It's born, feels the exuberance of youth...
www.rpleepestcontrol.com

Learns to walk, then to fly.
Experiences the wonder of flying and walking on ceilings.

Then, they fall in love. There's that first shy kiss, then what may be a multitude of broken-heard relationships.
hoardingwoes.files.wordpress.com

Divorce court, seeing the kids only every other week...

A life slowly coming to an end. maybe heavy drinking sets in.

Maybe one last tango,

25.media.tumblr.com

before embracing the cold dark...

static.freepik.com
 
2013-09-16 04:45:04 PM
Time flies like an arrow.
Fruit flies like a banana.
 
2013-09-16 04:59:50 PM
So, if I can catch a flying fly, does that mean my time moves even slower and I'm going to live forever?
 
2013-09-16 05:51:32 PM
What I want to know is how the little bastards can sense that I'm about to swat them before I even start to move my arm.
 
2013-09-16 08:40:37 PM
Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.
 
2013-09-17 08:48:36 AM
Flies are like climatologists - just as you're about to swat their specious arguments with some righteous falsification, they move the goal posts and jump to some other ridiculous made-up rubbish. Only the outcome - the "worst crisis ever to face mankind" remains the same. Funny that.
 
2013-09-17 03:36:04 PM

croesius: FTA: "It's tempting to think that for children time moves more slowly than it does for grownups, and there is some evidence that it might," he said.

My theory on this is that relative to the amount of time a child has been alive, a minute/day/years is much much longer than the same amount of time for an adult. To a 5 year old, a single year is 20% of their entire span of existence, maybe 50% of their cognizant existence. The same year to a 50 year old is about 2%. Thus, the child's year takes forever, relative to what they have to base it against.


That's been my thoughts on the matter.
 
Displayed 26 of 26 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report