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(CNN)   California school district hires firm to monitor middle & high school students' social media posts   (cnn.com) divider line 14
    More: Scary, California, high schools, school districts, Chris Frydrych, Hermosa Beach, Studebaker, truancy, consumer rights  
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4251 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Sep 2013 at 12:54 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-09-14 07:31:21 PM
2 votes:
FTFA:  "Honestly, we're not spying on kids. Can we focus back on the problem: The problem is we're not listening effectively," Frydrych said.

No, you ARE spying on kids.  That's exactly what you're doing.  That's the whole point of whole point of what you're doing.  How is that even deniable?

I can't really see this as a privacy issue, since it's public information they're monitoring.  What bothers me is that they're using public funds to pay someone to spy on their students.  Especially when the article says that they have reduced mental health services in the schools.

"So, we have this $40,500 we can spend.  Think we should try to bring the mental health services back up so we can help some of the kids with problems?"

"Naw, let's use it to spy on their Facebook comments instead."

Nice decision making skills you've got there, administrators.
2013-09-14 12:57:15 PM
2 votes:

Secret Agent X23: In another recent incident, a student posted a photo of what appeared to be a gun, and a subsequent inquiry determined the gun was fake, Sheehan said.
 Still, school administrators spoke with the parents of the student, who wasn't disciplined, the superintendent said.
"We had to educate the student on the dangers" of posting such photos, Sheehan said. "He was a good kid. ... It had a good ending."

That's right. You heard right. Tax dollars in this school district are being spent to educate youngsters on the dangers of posting pictures of fake guns on Facebook.

Those dangers, of course, being that they may end up having to deal with hysterical adults who think that pictures of fake guns are somehow dangerous.

Well, to be fair, I don't really know. Maybe they are. Maybe they could put someone's eye out. I mean, this recent incident had "a good ending," but the next one... who knows what could happen?


What happens when it is a real gun, but the pic was taken by their parent say at a range, where they were teaching their kid how to be responsible with it?
2013-09-14 11:55:15 AM
2 votes:

olddeegee: Since they're under 18 and the monitoring is being done at the school's behest, I'm not sure that their Constitutional rights exist yet. The parents, though, may have a complaint since this is also an intrusion into THEIR rights. If my kid's under 18 and you're monitoring him, you're actually monitoring me.


You do not have to be 18 to have Constitutional rights, and the Supreme Court has ruled your Constitutional rights don't stop at the school door.
Teacher, leave them kids alone.
2013-09-14 09:25:45 PM
1 votes:
Little Bobby Tables is going to have a LOT of social media activity
2013-09-14 04:53:54 PM
1 votes:

scottydoesntknow: digitalrain: Any constitutional law buffs out there want to weigh in? Isn't this an invasion of privacy? Or do they get a pass because the
posts are already public?

If it's open and accessible to the public, then it's open season for them to read it. Now if you set your privacy to not show anything, I don't believe they can force you to show your page or accept a friend request from the Facebook Hall Monitors.


Yep, and so long as this is where it stops I'm okay with it.  If you want your Facebook posts to be private then you should mark your profile as private.  If you do, then all contact should be treated like a phone call: private, and not to be snooped on without a warrant of some kind.

The inverse of this though is that if you DON'T mark it as private then you're doing the internet equivalent of shouting things to your friend across an open, crowded room.  I wouldn't have a problem if a teacher happened to be in that crowd when Jackass A shouted "hey bro, I totally stole the answers for the test next week" to Jackass B, even if said teacher came there all the time specifically to overhear student conversations.  It's a public place, you should expect that someone might overhear what you say.  If you say something dumb like that where you know an authority figure could hear it... well you deserve to get caught.
2013-09-14 04:34:03 PM
1 votes:
Don't worry folks, this will just be temporary until this generation gets to college.  Then we need to add monitors for college.  Then when they enter the workforce, they'll need some monitoring there, you know, just in case.
Once they're in the work force in general monitoring there own posts is pretty useless unless you monitor their older workers and family members social media too, you know, to see what they're agreeing with or "liking".
Some of the stuff they "like" could be real dangerous like, Al Qaeda or worse The Tea Party or the NRA or any position  or opinion not officially declared "OK" by our new thought police.
2013-09-14 03:57:19 PM
1 votes:
"In another recent incident, a student posted a photo of what appeared to be a gun, and a subsequent inquiry determined the gun was fake, Sheehan said.
Still, school administrators spoke with the parents of the student, who wasn't disciplined, the superintendent said.
"We had to educate the student on the dangers" of posting such photos, Sheehan said."

Apparently I need to be educated as well. What are the "dangers" of posting pics of a fake gun? Or a real gun? I need to know soon, deer season is right around the corner. I don't want an "inquiry", let alone "discipline".
2013-09-14 03:22:26 PM
1 votes:

Kahabut: How I feel about this comes down to three things.
1)What happens when your profile is private?

2) To what degree are they storing this information, and for how long?

3) Are the administrators going to use it to harass kids that are not breaking any school rules at school?


I've always thought it would be a great and evil enterprise to download and store people's social media (Facebook, YouTube, twitter - whatever's public) and then hold on to it until those people become professionals and sell it to companies who want to vett those professionals or to the individuals themselves to be done with what they wish. Would also work great for political candidates.
2013-09-14 01:34:42 PM
1 votes:
As to the constitutionality, well, I've been saying it since the NSA b/s broke: you have no "right to privacy" to stuff you didn't attempt to keep private to begin with.

For the rest, I don't know what the school thinks they can do with the "intel" they get, since I predict a sudden increase in fake school threats just for teh lulz.
2013-09-14 01:28:59 PM
1 votes:
Welcome to the new order!  Have a nice day.
2013-09-14 01:10:03 PM
1 votes:
As much as I don't agree with it, it doesn't really violate anything. I hate to say it, but it's not really invading privacy when the posts are out there for the whole world to see. Punishment done by the school district for things posted that have nothing to do with school would be a different story though.
2013-09-14 11:56:33 AM
1 votes:
In another recent incident, a student posted a photo of what appeared to be a gun, and a subsequent inquiry determined the gun was fake, Sheehan said.
 Still, school administrators spoke with the parents of the student, who wasn't disciplined, the superintendent said.
"We had to educate the student on the dangers" of posting such photos, Sheehan said. "He was a good kid. ... It had a good ending."


That's right. You heard right. Tax dollars in this school district are being spent to educate youngsters on the dangers of posting pictures of fake guns on Facebook.

Those dangers, of course, being that they may end up having to deal with hysterical adults who think that pictures of fake guns are somehow dangerous.

Well, to be fair, I don't really know. Maybe they are. Maybe they could put someone's eye out. I mean, this recent incident had "a good ending," but the next one... who knows what could happen?
2013-09-14 11:55:47 AM
1 votes:

Peepeye: Barfmaker: This is something you can get paid to do? Because it's kinda brilliant...

Oh, and Orwell something something fear terrible privacy unfair.

I think that sounds like a horrible job. I would only last a week, tops.


After the 100th tweet about Justin Bieber or One Direction, I'd probably be looking for a window to jump out of.
2013-09-14 07:12:22 AM
1 votes:
Not sure how I feel on this one.

On the one hand, it's about time *someone* gives enough of a damn about these kids to wonder  whatthey are up to.

On the other hand, what students (and teachers for that matter) do and say away from school should  be their own business.

Any constitutional law buffs out there want to weigh in? Isn't this an invasion of privacy? Or do they get a pass because the
posts are already public?

Why aren't the parents keeping tabs on what their kids are doing / saying online? You know, PARENTING????
 
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