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(Phys Org2)   Meet Raspberry Pi, a wee, kid-friendly computer from Google designed to get kids comfortable with coding and the internet as well as narcing on their parents to the government   (phys.org ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Raspberry Pi, Google, line coding, high-definition video, development environment, SD Card, word processing, computers  
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4313 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Sep 2013 at 9:27 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



87 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2013-09-14 07:50:07 AM  
Google didn't design or manufacture Raspberry Pi.
 
2013-09-14 07:51:03 AM  
Google didn't make Raspberry Pi, tardmitter.
 
2013-09-14 07:53:04 AM  
Google didn't create Raspberry Pi, foolmitter.
 
2013-09-14 07:57:49 AM  
All dumping on Subby aside, my Brit friends were showing theirs to me and it is really cool. I've ordered one for myself.
 
2013-09-14 08:05:01 AM  

God Is My Co-Pirate: All dumping on Subby aside, my Brit friends were showing theirs to me and it is really cool. I've ordered one for myself.


I have one. It's pretty sweet and a great excuse to learn Python.
 
2013-09-14 08:54:26 AM  
Look: yes, the NSA has some pretty scary capability to spy on us and intercept Internet traffic.

However, they probably don't give a shiat about you or your vast collection of furry porn.
 
2013-09-14 09:12:23 AM  
I wish I had that when I was a kid

All I had was a Commodore 64, and I didn't turn out like the awesome programmer that I always wanted to be
 
2013-09-14 09:31:20 AM  
My kids want to get into programming.  Back in the stone age I got my start with BASIC on an Apple IIe and a c64, whats the best path for kids these days?
 
2013-09-14 09:31:22 AM  
You don't need to buy yet another piece of hardware to get comfortable with coding. Just install Python.

cman: I wish I had that when I was a kid

All I had was a Commodore 64, and I didn't turn out like the awesome programmer that I always wanted to be


The poor musician always blames the instrument.
 
2013-09-14 09:33:15 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: You don't need to buy yet another piece of hardware to get comfortable with coding. Just install Python.

cman: I wish I had that when I was a kid

All I had was a Commodore 64, and I didn't turn out like the awesome programmer that I always wanted to be

The poor musician always blames the instrument.


LOL

I was being kinda snarky there

the opposite of charity is justice: My kids want to get into programming.  Back in the stone age I got my start with BASIC on an Apple IIe and a c64, whats the best path for kids these days?


HTML is the best way to introduce someone to programming.

Its simple as shiat and it is very logical
 
2013-09-14 09:38:32 AM  
I got one of these for Christmas when I was like ten.  It could run some simple BASIC stuff and was a decent introduction to using computers.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-14 09:40:28 AM  

jake_lex: Look: yes, the NSA has some pretty scary capability to spy on us and intercept Internet traffic.

However, they probably don't give a shiat about you or your vast collection of furry porn.


That's just what they want you to think!
 
2013-09-14 09:54:23 AM  

the opposite of charity is justice: My kids want to get into programming.  Back in the stone age I got my start with BASIC on an Apple IIe and a c64, whats the best path for kids these days?


Python is a good starter language for teaching object oriented concepts and basic constructs. Super easy to do I/O and draw simple pictures with turtle. If they're a little younger though maybe check out alice.org.
 
2013-09-14 10:03:44 AM  

Robots are Strong: the opposite of charity is justice: My kids want to get into programming.  Back in the stone age I got my start with BASIC on an Apple IIe and a c64, whats the best path for kids these days?

Python is a good starter language for teaching object oriented concepts and basic constructs. Super easy to do I/O and draw simple pictures with turtle. If they're a little younger though maybe check out alice.org.


Actually, that reminds me...

If one wants a pure object-oriented programming language, then one should try Objective-C. It is absolutely amazing how integrated OS X is with its own apps that were made from Cocoa. Dictionary spell checking in every program. Speech synthesis in every program. Spotlight search in every program.

OS X is absolutely amazing when it comes to integration. Its a shame that people take a shiat all over it
 
2013-09-14 10:14:14 AM  
jimmyjimmy subsub: Idiot & moron.
 
2013-09-14 10:15:09 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: You don't need to buy yet another piece of hardware to get comfortable with coding. Just install Python.

cman: I wish I had that when I was a kid

All I had was a Commodore 64, and I didn't turn out like the awesome programmer that I always wanted to be

The poor musician always blames the instrument.


I agree, but there are a limited number of options if you want access to GPIO, I2C and SPI.
 
2013-09-14 10:20:32 AM  

cman: OS X is absolutely amazing when it comes to integration. Its a shame that people take a shiat all over it


We do? I'm pretty certain even the most hardcore apple haters will respect Apple for their pretty amazing level of integration between their products and frameworks. Plus I'd hazard the vast majority of Apple haters don't hate OS X, they hate the business practices, image, and forced dumbing down of things with Apple products. I'm in the last camp, because they've intentionally walled things off over the years. OS X was, for a really long time, an amazing piece of software. But their business of enforcing their ecosystem really took a number on its flexibility.

Seriously, who hates Apple products for their integration capabilities?
 
2013-09-14 10:20:46 AM  

God Is My Co-Pirate: All dumping on Subby aside, my Brit friends were showing theirs to me and it is really cool. I've ordered one for myself.


They're really kick ass little XBMC front ends, got two here an older 256MB and a newer 512MB version of the model 'B'.  Plays pretty much everything I throw at it, although you'll want to move the /.xbmc/temp and /.xbmc/userdata/thumbnails to a network share and symlink it as those two directories can get pretty large and the LAN is often faster than the SD card.

Doing that solved my interface lag and space issues on a 4GB SD card (my media store is rather large).

I know there are plenty of other ARM based systems with more grunt for a little more than the Pi but yeah, the Pi does what I need it to.

/OpenElec is what I run.
//And a Hauppage MCE-a-like remote.
 
2013-09-14 10:26:19 AM  

palladiate: cman: OS X is absolutely amazing when it comes to integration. Its a shame that people take a shiat all over it

We do? I'm pretty certain even the most hardcore apple haters will respect Apple for their pretty amazing level of integration between their products and frameworks. Plus I'd hazard the vast majority of Apple haters don't hate OS X, they hate the business practices, image, and forced dumbing down of things with Apple products. I'm in the last camp, because they've intentionally walled things off over the years. OS X was, for a really long time, an amazing piece of software. But their business of enforcing their ecosystem really took a number on its flexibility.

Seriously, who hates Apple products for their integration capabilities?


I wouldn't use the word hate but they aren't that impressive.
 
2013-09-14 10:29:58 AM  

b2theory: palladiate: cman: OS X is absolutely amazing when it comes to integration. Its a shame that people take a shiat all over it

We do? I'm pretty certain even the most hardcore apple haters will respect Apple for their pretty amazing level of integration between their products and frameworks. Plus I'd hazard the vast majority of Apple haters don't hate OS X, they hate the business practices, image, and forced dumbing down of things with Apple products. I'm in the last camp, because they've intentionally walled things off over the years. OS X was, for a really long time, an amazing piece of software. But their business of enforcing their ecosystem really took a number on its flexibility.

Seriously, who hates Apple products for their integration capabilities?

I wouldn't use the word hate but they aren't that impressive.


Automator is a bundled app in OS X. It shows the all encompassing power of an object oriented operating system. The things it can do is insane
 
2013-09-14 10:31:48 AM  

Robots are Strong: the opposite of charity is justice: My kids want to get into programming.  Back in the stone age I got my start with BASIC on an Apple IIe and a c64, whats the best path for kids these days?

Python is a good starter language for teaching object oriented concepts and basic constructs. Super easy to do I/O and draw simple pictures with turtle. If they're a little younger though maybe check out alice.org.


Unless they want a career. Let them download Visual Studio Express for free and they can learn the dot net framework as well as C#.
 
2013-09-14 10:41:56 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
Had one of these back in the day. Ah the days of loading and storing programs on cassette. I think I learned a little.  Rasberry Pi is on my birthday wish list.
 
2013-09-14 10:42:31 AM  

b2theory: I wouldn't use the word hate but they aren't that impressive.


Considering the uncountable number of times I have to tweak even Microsoft software to run on it's native Microsoft OS, yea, I'm going with "that impressive."

Zeroconf to printers or your Apple TV. Don't own any personal Apple gear at the moment, but helping a friend set up their new sound system to their gear and play their music around the house via their iPhone was pretty painless. Almost no time spent on automatic configuration changes.

Getting my coworker's two dozen server .NET deployment reconfigured while he's on a flight and can't roll back a change because some DBAs screwed up only to be completely cockblocked by the fact IIS would cling to dead app pools for no reason whatsoever and keep talking to the dead database despite it being an "automatic configuration change" that required changing dozens of files by hand and back, then rebooting each machine twice so the .NET managed application pool would properly recycle? And I'm told .NET services all integrate impressively too, or at least by our Microsoft fans.

Hey, is Apple-level easy integration that hard? Not really, but everyone else sort of dropped the ball.
 
2013-09-14 10:43:53 AM  
It appears they've "invented" a linux distribution (based on Raspbian, perhaps) designed for using the RaspberryPi as a web server, with some special software that is implied to work only with the Google Chrome browser (of course) for making web-based stuff.
 
2013-09-14 10:44:45 AM  

palladiate: b2theory: I wouldn't use the word hate but they aren't that impressive.

Considering the uncountable number of times I have to tweak even Microsoft software to run on it's native Microsoft OS, yea, I'm going with "that impressive."

Zeroconf to printers or your Apple TV. Don't own any personal Apple gear at the moment, but helping a friend set up their new sound system to their gear and play their music around the house via their iPhone was pretty painless. Almost no time spent on automatic configuration changes.

Getting my coworker's two dozen server .NET deployment reconfigured while he's on a flight and can't roll back a change because some DBAs screwed up only to be completely cockblocked by the fact IIS would cling to dead app pools for no reason whatsoever and keep talking to the dead database despite it being an "automatic configuration change" that required changing dozens of files by hand and back, then rebooting each machine twice so the .NET managed application pool would properly recycle? And I'm told .NET services all integrate impressively too, or at least by our Microsoft fans.

Hey, is Apple-level easy integration that hard? Not really, but everyone else sort of dropped the ball.


If you want to have some fun, try to hackintosh.

It is a great experience.

Trying to make Apple integration with hardware that wasn't meant for it was a hell of a challenge to overcome. Its pretty much easy these days, however.
 
2013-09-14 10:50:27 AM  

cman: If you want to have some fun, try to hackintosh.

It is a great experience.

Trying to make Apple integration with hardware that wasn't meant for it was a hell of a challenge to overcome. Its pretty much easy these days, however.


I'd say it's still not great. Tried getting a Dell Optiplex 755 to run. It did, sort of. Kept having boot errors, sound would take a dump, and updates were a B. It's a fun project and those guys do some awesome work compiling lists of kexts, but just not for me.
 
2013-09-14 10:55:10 AM  

cman: If you want to have some fun, try to hackintosh.


I've done it before and my recent rebuild was selected out to make another. It's a hell of a lot easier these days than it was for my first one 6, maybe 7 years ago.

First I have to rip open my friend's iMac and put in an SSD. I was on the fence as to whether it was going to be like every laptop I've rebuilt, or just this terrifying mess of custom components inside, waiting to explode when you pop that screen. Fortunately the teardowns I've read show it to be the former. The brand new ones however...
 
2013-09-14 10:56:48 AM  

palladiate: b2theory: I wouldn't use the word hate but they aren't that impressive.

Considering the uncountable number of times I have to tweak even Microsoft software to run on it's native Microsoft OS, yea, I'm going with "that impressive."

Zeroconf to printers or your Apple TV. Don't own any personal Apple gear at the moment, but helping a friend set up their new sound system to their gear and play their music around the house via their iPhone was pretty painless. Almost no time spent on automatic configuration changes.

Getting my coworker's two dozen server .NET deployment reconfigured while he's on a flight and can't roll back a change because some DBAs screwed up only to be completely cockblocked by the fact IIS would cling to dead app pools for no reason whatsoever and keep talking to the dead database despite it being an "automatic configuration change" that required changing dozens of files by hand and back, then rebooting each machine twice so the .NET managed application pool would properly recycle? And I'm told .NET services all integrate impressively too, or at least by our Microsoft fans.

Hey, is Apple-level easy integration that hard? Not really, but everyone else sort of dropped the ball.


Confession: I use apple consumer devices at home and live them. We dumped cable and are running only an AppleTV.

As an engineer I appreciate how hard it is to create an infinitely configurable tool. That is everything to everyone. I understand Apple's descision to not play there, but it doesn't represent a technical achievement.
 
2013-09-14 10:57:26 AM  

the opposite of charity is justice: My kids want to get into programming.  Back in the stone age I got my start with BASIC on an Apple IIe and a c64, whats the best path for kids these days?


www.exoticindia.com
 
2013-09-14 10:58:02 AM  
A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.
 
2013-09-14 11:01:48 AM  

CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.


Web server, NAS (to an extent), a simple web/email computer you can use with a monitor or TV, a media streaming device (my favorite being Openelec with integrated XBMC). The fact that it is low power puts it in line with other set top boxes and it's very configurable.
 
2013-09-14 11:02:51 AM  

CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.


Super low-cost media clients (via XBMC) seems to be the most common (myself included), they can do virtually any sort of media short of bluray ISOs (the most bloated way to store movies & shows but if you've got the storage why not).  Alot of adventurous people pair them with mechanical parts to make interesting little one-off projects.  Friend of mine made an automatic cat feeder for instance.

/the biggest hurdle was getting the cats into the dispenser
 
2013-09-14 11:07:26 AM  

b2theory: I understand Apple's descision to not play there, but it doesn't represent a technical achievement.


In that there is quite literally nobody else that comes close? Playing with Microsoft's integration between their home software, X Box, cloud services, phone, etc is always either absent or barely more than half-assed. More often it's intentionally crippled. Sony's are frequently intentionally crippled.

There aren't many players in the "make everything electronic in your home work great together" department. If it wasn't an achievement of some sort, Apple wouldn't be that much more impressive than them.

My confession? I like my MBP I use for work, hate my crapbox Dell I have to use to use Visual Studio, and do all my real work between Ubuntu and Red Hat. IDGAF which tool I use to get a job done, as long as it's not a giant pain.
 
2013-09-14 11:13:26 AM  
Im pretty sure raspberry pi is made by a nonprofit foundation and the chips are made by qualcomm. But derp away subby.
 
2013-09-14 11:26:13 AM  

MightyPez: CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.

Web server, NAS (to an extent), a simple web/email computer you can use with a monitor or TV, a media streaming device (my favorite being Openelec with integrated XBMC). The fact that it is low power puts it in line with other set top boxes and it's very configurable.


Pretty much all of this. Of course, you can buy products that do any of these things if what you really want to do is have a NAS, media box, etc. The real point of a Pi is the pleasure of learning by discovery, and ultimately of seeing something do real work and saying "I made that" -- even if the real work is something as trivial as turning on your toaster with a text message.

net: if you don't enjoy the actual making part, you probably won't consider the Pi good value.
 
2013-09-14 11:28:30 AM  

Mister Buttons: I got one of these for Christmas when I was like ten.  It could run some simple BASIC stuff and was a decent introduction to using computers.

[i.imgur.com image 700x535]


5318008
 
2013-09-14 11:38:44 AM  

Doktor_Zhivago: Im pretty sure raspberry pi is made by a nonprofit foundation and the chips are made by qualcomm. But derp away subby.


Broadcom made the SOC.
 
2013-09-14 11:38:55 AM  

palladiate: Hey, is Apple-level easy integration that hard? Not really, but everyone else sort of dropped the ball.


Indeed.  It's the thing I've said for quite a while, Dell, HP or any other large OEM could do the exact same thing Apple have done.  The desktop's ship with all the software & drivers needed to make use of the other hardware the company sells and well that's pretty much it really.

But no, there is no easy to use front end management application installed as standard on a Dell that'd let you manage the Dell phone, slate, MP3 player, etc and well consumers like things like iTunes to manage these devices irrespective of the mewling nerd rage that "it's a drive letter you just drag & drop".

It's simple fit & finish grade stuff that ended up being considered too expensive and junked during the race to the bottom during the 90's.
 
2013-09-14 11:41:45 AM  

Mister Buttons: I got one of these for Christmas when I was like ten.  It could run some simple BASIC stuff and was a decent introduction to using computers.

[i.imgur.com image 700x535]


Bah. I had one of these:
jscustom.theoldcomputer.com
/"Computer Programming!" cartridge let you write assembly programs, with one line of output, and no involatile storage.
//hot image
 
2013-09-14 11:45:44 AM  

MightyPez: CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.

Web server, NAS (to an extent), a simple web/email computer you can use with a monitor or TV, a media streaming device (my favorite being Openelec with integrated XBMC). The fact that it is low power puts it in line with other set top boxes and it's very configurable.


Plus the camera module is a pretty impressive piece of hardware for the price. Honestly, the better question is what isn't the Raspberry Pi good for. I'm currently working on a remote control tank streaming live video to an Oculus Rift using a Pi as the brain. I'm thinking about picking up another Pi this winter, putting a few emulators on it, and getting a  cheap  joystick and a few  buttons to  build a scaled down arcade cabinet with an extra LCD monitor I have in a closet.
 
2013-09-14 11:52:41 AM  

CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.


The thing about the RPi is that it's very cheap and very small, but "powerful enough" for many tasks (about on par with what is now a low-end smartphone). You wouldn't want to use it for a gaming rig, but it can handle many mundane tasks quite well, and that makes it useful as a small workhorse.

The other thing goes back to its size (about as big as a deck of cards). This lets you fit it into spots that you couldn't really put a computer before unless you were willing to sacrifice a smartphone (or use something a LOT less powerful). For example, I've got an old Omnibot that I've thought about retrofitting with one of these.
 
2013-09-14 11:56:18 AM  

Robots are Strong: I'm thinking about picking up another Pi this winter, putting a few emulators on it, and getting a  cheap  joystick and a few  buttons to  build a scaled down arcade cabinet with an extra LCD monitor I have in a closet.


Keep in mind the Pi's main strength is it's GPU.  The CPU is actually pretty weak so whilst it can deal with some emulators don't expect too much of anything that'shiatting the CPU hard; it tends to choke far easier than you'd imagine.
 
2013-09-14 11:57:08 AM  

BumpInTheNight: CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.

Super low-cost media clients (via XBMC) seems to be the most common (myself included), they can do virtually any sort of media short of bluray ISOs (the most bloated way to store movies & shows but if you've got the storage why not).  Alot of adventurous people pair them with mechanical parts to make interesting little one-off projects.  Friend of mine made an automatic cat feeder for instance.

/the biggest hurdle was getting the cats into the dispenser


+1 for using it for OpenELEC (or I suppose one could use RaspBMC or the Debian version).

My media is stored on my NAS so the RPi is used primarily as an XBMC client but I also have it running as my dedicated scraper (since it's on all the time) and linked it to Maraschino (running on the NAS).  The Pi is a fun toy to play with, even with its limitations.
 
2013-09-14 11:59:25 AM  
I picked one up a few weeks ago and I having a lot of fun with it. It is being repurposed into a portable PC in a pelican case. I picked up a second one and turned it into an emulation machine for my kiddos. Lots of possibilities with the Pi.
 
2013-09-14 12:09:23 PM  

CtrlAltDestroy: A question for talented farkers -

What kind of things is the Rasberry Pi good for, used for, etc? If I got one what exactly could I do with it? What do other people do with it? It seems neat but I've never looked into it's practical applications.


I have two - both pretty underutilized.

One runs the DNS/DHCP for my home network. It's a fairly complex network, but it's still fairly set-and-forget. It does do ad-blocking at the DNS level (eg, my network doesn't know how to reach doubleclick), using a list of hosts updated once per week.

The other acts as a VPN gateway, allowing any (or all) hosts on my network to tunnel into Seattle (Hulu, US netflix, eg). CPU wise that one actually isn't underutilized, during an 8 mbps netflix stream say, the CPU reaches around 90% for the vpn program. (OpenVPN).

Both had an uptime of around 130 days just up until recently before my wife somehow unplugged their power sources.
 
2013-09-14 12:16:23 PM  

Vaneshi: Robots are Strong: I'm thinking about picking up another Pi this winter, putting a few emulators on it, and getting a  cheap  joystick and a few  buttons to  build a scaled down arcade cabinet with an extra LCD monitor I have in a closet.

Keep in mind the Pi's main strength is it's GPU.  The CPU is actually pretty weak so whilst it can deal with some emulators don't expect too much of anything that'shiatting the CPU hard; it tends to choke far easier than you'd imagine.


I've had luck overclocking it to 1GHz, but you're right about the GPU. For this project it wouldn't matter though, it would probably be mostly old NES games from when I was a kid. Maybe some SNES or Sega.
 
2013-09-14 12:24:09 PM  
First thing I programmed on:

codinghorror.typepad.com

/I wish I was kidding...
//My, doesn't my lawn look nice...
 
2013-09-14 12:28:07 PM  
I was looking at the Pi, but I need analog inputs. The Beaglebone Black has A/D channels built in plus quite a few additional I/Os of various types (I2C, CAN, SPI, UART, etc.), runs Android and some Linices, so it's my current front runner. Costs only ten bucks more than the Pi. Doesn't have a powerful GPU like the Pi, but I don't need that much processing power anyway.
 
2013-09-14 12:29:40 PM  

Green Scorpio: Robots are Strong:Python is a good starter language for teaching object oriented concepts and basic constructs. Super easy to do I/O and draw simple pictures with turtle. If they're a little younger though maybe check out alice.org.

Unless they want a career. Let them download Visual Studio Express for free and they can learn the dot net framework as well as C#.


Nearly all of Google's infrastructure is written in Python.
 
2013-09-14 12:44:36 PM  
+1 on the XBMC front end. My plan is to load that up, copy over some kid movies, and use it for road trips. Also hopefully get the XBMC remote app on an old phone for a wi-fi remote.
 
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