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(National Geographic)   Incredible jumping robot synchronizes its leg movements to within 1/300,000 of a second using interlocking gears and accelerates at a massive 400g's. Oh wait, did I say robot? I meant insect   (news.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool, insects, gears, hind limbs, Duke University in North Carolina, research subject, sheds, robots, grasshoppers  
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2950 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Sep 2013 at 8:20 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-12 08:25:50 PM
Nature throws out organisms with pretty crazy shiat. I'd be more impressed if a robot could do that now.

/still cool
 
2013-09-12 08:38:14 PM
Truly the steampunkest of insects.
 
2013-09-12 09:25:36 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-12 09:25:56 PM
Whoa, that is legitimately cool.  Thanks, Subby!
 
2013-09-12 09:47:44 PM
Well creationists aren't going to happy about this. Their watchmaker analogy is going down in flames.
 
2013-09-12 10:01:30 PM
Springtails may not have the neat gearing, but do something comparable
 
2013-09-12 10:02:09 PM
This would have been way cooler as a robot. fark you subby.
 
2013-09-12 10:17:45 PM
It's like a tiny mashup of a grasshopper, a horseshoe crab and a wind-up toy.

Not nearly as cute as a  smiling, fluffy jumping spider, though. (NSFA*)

*Arachnophobes


More arachnocuteness
 
Skr
2013-09-12 10:22:20 PM
Kinda curious if this mini biology can be of help to robotics. Seems pretty cool.
On a side note I wonder if any of the "world of the future" ideas in the past had jumping vehicles instead of common idea of flying vehicles.
 
2013-09-12 10:42:11 PM

Skr: Kinda curious if this mini biology can be of help to robotics. Seems pretty cool.
On a side note I wonder if any of the "world of the future" ideas in the past had jumping vehicles instead of common idea of flying vehicles.


Yeah because accelerating passengers to 400 G is a great way to get around.

Did I say "get around"? I'm sorry, I meant "make soup".
 
2013-09-13 12:27:22 AM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: Skr: Kinda curious if this mini biology can be of help to robotics. Seems pretty cool.
On a side note I wonder if any of the "world of the future" ideas in the past had jumping vehicles instead of common idea of flying vehicles.

Yeah because accelerating passengers to 400 G is a great way to get around.

Did I say "get around"? I'm sorry, I meant "make soup".


Keep them insect sized and it might be a perfectly feasible solution.
 
2013-09-13 12:48:28 AM
I'm pretty sure I saw those things in New Guinea. Always wondered what they were. They jumped crazy far.
 
2013-09-13 01:23:41 AM
I didn't believe the 400g in the headline, since this one didn't give acceleration at all, so I googled.  Other articles are reporting 200g.

But then I found the full paper (from 2009/2010, good job keeping current there, media), and it says:
In the best jumps by males of the planthopper Issus, the body is again accelerated in less than 1ms to a take-off velocity of 5.5ms-1, is subjected to a force of 719g

719g.  Holy shiat.  That's... *napkin math* hitting the ground at 160mph.  That turns people to soup.
 
2013-09-13 03:03:40 AM
Life..uh... finds a way.
 
2013-09-13 03:36:34 AM
In B4 intelligent design
 
2013-09-13 05:14:49 AM
Insect is more believable than robot, since they've been developing these skills for MUCH longer.
 
2013-09-13 08:07:32 AM
Unlike humans, the adolescents don't give adults the gears.
 
2013-09-13 10:44:12 AM
Heard this on NPR this morning.  Neat stuff, kinda surprised it wasn't found out sooner.
 
2013-09-13 05:36:18 PM
I'd like to know what grinds their gears.
 
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