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(LA Times)   Dolby achieves 100% breathing noise reduction   (latimes.com) divider line 96
    More: Sad, David Dolby, noises, reductions  
•       •       •

12479 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Sep 2013 at 8:03 PM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-12 08:04:43 PM
He died peacefully at home, surround sounded by family and friends.
 
2013-09-12 08:05:28 PM
content7.flixster.com
Rip "Blinded me with Science," guy
 
2013-09-12 08:05:39 PM
images2.mtv.com
RIP Thomas Dolby
 
2013-09-12 08:06:15 PM
*shakes tiny fist at obamadidcoke*
 
2013-09-12 08:07:47 PM
He blinded me...with SILENCE!
 
2013-09-12 08:08:26 PM

phamwaa: *shakes tiny fist at obamadidcoke*


In the 80's I thought he was responsible for both the song and the noise reduction on the cassette player.
 
2013-09-12 08:08:28 PM
Disrespectful headline, Subby!

Boo! Boo! Hiss!
 
2013-09-12 08:09:04 PM
076dd0a50e0c1255009e-bd4b8aabaca29897bc751dfaf75b290c.r40.cf1.rackcdn.com
Sad.
 
2013-09-12 08:09:43 PM
Did Todd kill him?

img2u.info

...something something ring tone something...
 
2013-09-12 08:10:08 PM
4e.img.v4.skyrock.net
You can't hear how sad I am.
 
2013-09-12 08:13:38 PM
Dont want your love.
Don't want your money, hey
All I want is the pulse of a heartbeat
 
2013-09-12 08:16:59 PM
i1.ytimg.com
RIP funny soundman.

/Turn it up!!
 
2013-09-12 08:17:34 PM
I saw Tommy on one of his earliest movie soundsystems. Had to drive across Portland from the west side.

Now I complain that movies and sporting events are too loud.

RIP Loud movie guy!
 
2013-09-12 08:20:55 PM

phamwaa: RIP Thomas Dolby


I heard that guy invented the ringtone and he's filthy rich now.
 
2013-09-12 08:25:34 PM

Amos Quito: Hiss!


You know, I've got a filter that will take that right out.
 
2013-09-12 08:26:57 PM

Amos Quito: Disrespectful headline, Subby!

Boo! Boo!

Hiss!

Or after Dolby's technology is applied:

Boo! Boo!
 
2013-09-12 08:28:12 PM
SCIENCE.
 
2013-09-12 08:32:19 PM
Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.
 
2013-09-12 08:32:58 PM
ih0.redbubble.net

This one goes up to eleven heaven.
 
2013-09-12 08:37:35 PM

anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.


You nailed it. Dolby was great if you wanted a muddled, bassy sound with no highs. Not me.
 
2013-09-12 08:39:42 PM
I almost remember music systems without Dolby.

Almost, because that was before that new-fangled "stereo" was invented.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-09-12 08:41:34 PM
Dolby is now DNR
 
2013-09-12 08:42:15 PM

John Buck 41: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

You nailed it. Dolby was great if you wanted a muddled, bassy sound with no highs. Not me.


Yes, now we have MP3 to do that.
 
2013-09-12 08:42:17 PM
She deafened me with silence.
 
2013-09-12 08:44:10 PM
Stop it all of you! Enough with these tasteless jokes! Don't you know the audience is listening?
 
2013-09-12 08:44:13 PM
julieamarxhausen.files.wordpress.com
WHAT?!?!?!
 
2013-09-12 08:46:33 PM
I thought he kicked off a months ago. I swear I remember a different headline with a noise-reduction pun. What was that all about?

/Not gonna go look for it, because fark that.
 
2013-09-12 08:47:08 PM
"A months." A.
 
2013-09-12 08:52:19 PM

anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.


What?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise_reduction_system
 
2013-09-12 08:52:48 PM
 
2013-09-12 08:53:59 PM
Dear Submitter,

We cordially welcome you, and offer you our open arms here in Hell. We hope you enjoy your stay.

Sincerely,

Satan.

Ps: please be sure to provide your own towels
 
2013-09-12 09:04:51 PM
Last words:  "Thomas Jefferson Dolby still survives."
 
2013-09-12 09:05:49 PM

John Buck 41: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

You nailed it. Dolby was great if you wanted a muddled, bassy sound with no highs. Not me.


Had a tape deck with "dBx" on it.  Learned the hard way that I could not use that to record anything as my walkman could not handle it (like you said, just reduced the treble).   Experimented with the treble enough to figure out how to use just use "Dolby C," and made good tapes.
 
2013-09-12 09:06:45 PM
www.totalmedia.com
Is he live?
 
2013-09-12 09:08:02 PM
Thomas Dolby is his son's name.
Really, but has no relation to the musician.
 
2013-09-12 09:11:22 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

What?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise_reduction_system


Yeah, a lot of people don't understand that by expanding the dynamic range (and reducing the high frequency noise), the overall sound though playing at the same decibel levels, sounds quieter to the human ear. In reality, you actually get more sound.

Of course, if you have crappy speakers and equipment, you probably won't hear the expanded range anyway.

People like anthonix are the reason so many record producers compress music so heavily these days. It's just not worth putting out quality audio when people like that complain about it being to "quiet" and missing high-freq sound (which is actually hiss). Compression makes the songs sound more homogeneous across quality range of speakers and equipment and of course, makes them sound "louder"
 
2013-09-12 09:17:03 PM
www.chezplj.ca
The dead are listening....
 
zez
2013-09-12 09:17:42 PM

MBrady: John Buck 41: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

You nailed it. Dolby was great if you wanted a muddled, bassy sound with no highs. Not me.

Had a tape deck with "dBx" on it.  Learned the hard way that I could not use that to record anything as my walkman could not handle it (like you said, just reduced the treble).   Experimented with the treble enough to figure out how to use just use "Dolby C," and made good tapes.


I had a tape deck with dbx as well. It could make perfect hissless copies of records and cds, but you're right, it was unlistenable on any other device. My work around was to record the album on both sides of the cassette, one with dbx and one with dolby.
 
2013-09-12 09:18:55 PM
Dolby noise reduction was an incredibly ingenious yet simple way to reduce tape hiss.

I once had a tape deck that had Dolby B/C and DBX.
It also took all variations of metal tape, had blank skip, auto-reverse and track advance/reverse.
Aiwa made some awesome decks at one time.
 
2013-09-12 09:21:56 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

What?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise_reduction_system


From the article:
"Dolby noise reduction is a form of dynamic preemphasis employed during recording, plus a form of dynamic deemphasis used during playback"

From my comments:
"Record with treble BOOST (Dolby on)"   "and then play it back with it ON"

S
orry if you don't see the similarity.  DNR emphasizes the treble (the particular treble associated with tape hiss) when "on" while recording to your tape, and then reduces that particular treble when "on" played back.
 
2013-09-12 09:23:54 PM

MBrady: John Buck 41: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

You nailed it. Dolby was great if you wanted a muddled, bassy sound with no highs. Not me.

Had a tape deck with "dBx" on it.  Learned the hard way that I could not use that to record anything as my walkman could not handle it (like you said, just reduced the treble).   Experimented with the treble enough to figure out how to use just use "Dolby C," and made good tapes.


Had a 4-track recorder with dBx!  We would refer to it as "hardcore" Dolby Noise Reduction because it did a similar function, only to the extreme!  Worked pretty well with tape hiss provided you made sure you had your dBx ON while recording, and ON while playing back!  I still have those tapes!  But not the 4-track.  used it and fixed it so much it finally wore out.
 
2013-09-12 09:24:49 PM
 
2013-09-12 09:26:31 PM

LesserEvil: Quantum Apostrophe: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

What?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise_reduction_system

Yeah, a lot of people don't understand that by expanding the dynamic range (and reducing the high frequency noise), the overall sound though playing at the same decibel levels, sounds quieter to the human ear. In reality, you actually get more sound.

Of course, if you have crappy speakers and equipment, you probably won't hear the expanded range anyway.

People like anthonix are the reason so many record producers compress music so heavily these days. It's just not worth putting out quality audio when people like that complain about it being to "quiet" and missing high-freq sound (which is actually hiss). Compression makes the songs sound more homogeneous across quality range of speakers and equipment and of course, makes them sound "louder"


Holy cow!  You missed my point 100%.  It works reducing tape hiss as long as you RECORD TO TAPE WITH DOLBY ON.  It doesn't work when you record to cassette with DNR OFF.  That's all I was... sayin'.
 
2013-09-12 09:36:46 PM

anthonix: Quantum Apostrophe: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

What?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise_reduction_system

From the article:
"Dolby noise reduction is a form of dynamic preemphasis employed during recording, plus a form of dynamic deemphasis used during playback"

From my comments:
"Record with treble BOOST (Dolby on)"   "and then play it back with it ON"

Sorry if you don't see the similarity.  DNR emphasizes the treble (the particular treble associated with tape hiss) when "on" while recording to your tape, and then reduces that particular treble when "on" played back.



Um, whatever. You really do not understand what is happening, do you?

http://www.dolby.com/uploadedFiles/English_%28US%29/Professional/Tec hn ical_Library/Technologies/Dolby_A-type_NR/212_Dolby_B,_C_and_S_Noise_R eduction_Systems.pdf

Also, there is no Dolby system called DNR.

"Dolby noise reduction system, an audio noise reduction system often confused with DNR "

Further, you don't even say what Dolby system you are supposedly referring to.
 
2013-09-12 09:38:55 PM

zepher: Dolby noise reduction was an incredibly ingenious yet simple way to reduce tape hiss.

I once had a tape deck that had Dolby B/C and DBX.
It also took all variations of metal tape, had blank skip, auto-reverse and track advance/reverse.
Aiwa made some awesome decks at one time.


Preach on brother!
 
2013-09-12 09:40:00 PM
i.imgur.com
R.I.P - Dole, B.
 
2013-09-12 09:42:40 PM

Fano: Is he live?


No, at this point he's just a memorex.
 
2013-09-12 09:53:17 PM
Welp, I see that we were done here twice in less than the first 60 seconds.

/and it was the first time the misheard name meme was ever funny, too
 
2013-09-12 09:55:21 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: anthonix: Quantum Apostrophe: anthonix: Forgive me, and I'm only talking about Dolby Noise Reduction, but back in the tape days, I had a love/hate relationship with this function.  It only works if you record your cassettes with it ON, and then play it back with it ON.  I even used to call it "Dolby Treble Reduction" because all it does is reduce through EQ the high frequencies that are associated with tape hiss.  Unless you recorded your tape with the treble BOOST (Dolby on) the noise reduction just reduced the treble.

Just sayin'.

What?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolby_noise_reduction_system

From the article:
"Dolby noise reduction is a form of dynamic preemphasis employed during recording, plus a form of dynamic deemphasis used during playback"

From my comments:
"Record with treble BOOST (Dolby on)"   "and then play it back with it ON"

Sorry if you don't see the similarity.  DNR emphasizes the treble (the particular treble associated with tape hiss) when "on" while recording to your tape, and then reduces that particular treble when "on" played back.


Um, whatever. You really do not understand what is happening, do you?

http://www.dolby.com/uploadedFiles/English_%28US%29/Professional/Tec hn ical_Library/Technologies/Dolby_A-type_NR/212_Dolby_B,_C_and_S_Noise_R eduction_Systems.pdf

Also, there is no Dolby system called DNR.

"Dolby noise reduction system, an audio noise reduction system often confused with DNR "

Further, you don't even say what Dolby system you are supposedly referring to.


Dolby B, and eventually C when we each bought new tape decks.  I'm just using "DNR" for a short abbreviation just for posting.  Apparently in error.
 
2013-09-12 09:55:35 PM

whatshisname: Fano: Is he live?

No, at this point he's just a memorex.


assets0.ordienetworks.com
 
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