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(Washington Post)   So just how bad are things when Mark Zuckerberg is calling out the US government on "blowing it" when it comes to messaging about personal privacy rights?   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 13
    More: Ironic, Mark Zuckerberg, privacy, Facebook, Yahoo, NSA, NSA programs  
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2565 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Sep 2013 at 3:20 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-09-12 03:23:35 PM
3 votes:
He just doesn't want the NSA to blow his chances at increasing FB's presence in emerging markets.
2013-09-12 07:31:17 PM
1 votes:

Kazrath: If I want to put up pictures of myself wearing a thong while ball gagged with a large woman in leather spanking me


Pics, or it didn't happen.

Zuckerboy, and the rest of the filthy farks that roll over for NSA deserve to get beat with the irony stick.
2013-09-12 06:04:49 PM
1 votes:

4tehsnowflakes: Tigger: JohnnyC: People that complain about privacy while voluntarily posting their information on the internet are farking idiots (and/or assholes).

How to avoid having your private information from the public (or government).

1. Don't broadcast your private information via telephone, cellphone, text, email or other form of the internet, telegraph, or any other method of transmission.

2. Don't tell anyone your private information.

That's it. You don't really have to do anything else. You don't need encryption. You just have to keep your private information to yourself.

What an absolutely absurd position. Is it satire or something?

In a weak sense.  Domestic surveillance advocates argue "You already put yourself out there online, what are you worried about?"  This is a trollish variant.  You choose what to publish and what not to publish.  This post is a publication.  A phone call or non-blast email isn't.

[i1277.photobucket.com image 748x350]


Not to mention the fact that I am doing the choosing on what I want available.  If I want to put up pictures of myself wearing a thong while ball gagged with a large woman in leather spanking me... then that is my choice.  However, if I limit access to specific people and the NSA or law enforcement in general want to make sure I am not breaking some crime they should have no right to invade my privacy because: "They just want to make sure".

Until we start punishing the law breakers in these Intelligence/Law enforcement roles I don't really see many people having any trust in them or the goverment that gives them free reign.
2013-09-12 05:21:01 PM
1 votes:

tinyarena: You are correct. An article two weeks ago put the loss to American businesses overseas at $35B annually. The invisible hand has already commenced biatch slapping American companies who are in bed with the NSA. All that a global competitor have to say is, "We're not American. We don't give all your data to the spooks." And they'll get the deal done.


The single most important thing people outside the United States can do to put a stop to illegal NSA spying is convince their friends to boycott US internet companies where ever possible.

I think we all know that Corporate people have more sway over the Feds than flesh and blood people do.

It's important for the Corporate people to feel the pain right about now.
2013-09-12 05:15:56 PM
1 votes:
Since FB is 99% probability an NSA operation to begin with, this is even mo'funny.

/Choice-Point
//built with FBI funding
2013-09-12 04:52:25 PM
1 votes:

Weatherkiss: Not that bad, considering Facebook is voluntary and noone is being forced to use its service -- unlike the government which we elect into office and trust to enforce our right to privacy.


That's always such a weak argument for anything... nobody forces us to do anything... we can literally lay on the ground like a slug until we die if we want to.  That doesn't mean it's OK for governments to take advantage of people and go against their own rules.
2013-09-12 04:29:35 PM
1 votes:
QWEST was the last company to defy the NSA.  Look what happened to them.
2013-09-12 03:56:41 PM
1 votes:

badhatharry: J. Frank Parnell: Sounds like he's just saying they didn't paint a nice happy face on it all to make the public more comfortable with it.

Yep. And it's hurting his business. Things were going great until the government started weirding out people.


It's like your have a great party until everybody starts noticing the weird guy in the corner with a camera.
2013-09-12 03:31:14 PM
1 votes:
So just how bad are things when Mark Zuckerberg

That's already bad enough, right there.
2013-09-12 03:27:26 PM
1 votes:

Arkanaut: He just doesn't want the NSA to blow his chances at increasing FB's presence in emerging markets.


I believe one of the articles I read mentioned FB as one of the companies which has cooperated in at least some of the Man's information requests... but I'm sure they were 'all criminals'.

/sigh
2013-09-12 03:25:59 PM
1 votes:
Despite all this nonsense, people keep asking Federal law makers to legislate more rules, more regulations while they play video poker. Just wow.
2013-09-12 03:23:20 PM
1 votes:
1.bp.blogspot.com
2013-09-12 03:23:15 PM
1 votes:
Not that bad, considering Facebook is voluntary and noone is being forced to use its service -- unlike the government which we elect into office and trust to enforce our right to privacy.

But I admit that the line dividing a private for-profit enterprise and the U.S. government has been very blurry as of late.
 
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