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(LA Times)   Stanford University posts online collection of over 700 maps (dating from the early 1700s) depicting California as an island   (latimes.com) divider line 73
    More: Spiffy, Stanford University, islands, collections  
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6993 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Sep 2013 at 10:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-11 08:39:19 PM  
If only!
 
2013-09-11 09:07:29 PM  
Ok subby, the 17th century is not the same as the 1700's.

According to the article, the collection focuses on map which shows California as an island.  This was a very popular theory in the mid-1600's that persisted through the mid-1700's.

Below is one from my collection that shows California as an island, dated 1720.

i1165.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-11 09:38:29 PM  
Can you imagine how hard it was to draw a farking map before we had airplanes?
 
2013-09-11 09:53:35 PM  
Snake Pliskin: Cartographer
 
2013-09-11 10:40:10 PM  

Lsherm: Can you imagine how hard it was to draw a farking map before we had airplanes?


So what if you didn't have airplanes? You could still use GPS to figure out where you were.
 
2013-09-11 10:41:39 PM  
Learn to swim.
 
2013-09-11 10:41:39 PM  
Pfft. People in the 1700's were stupid.
 
2013-09-11 10:43:37 PM  
OMG CALIFORNIA IS ATLANTIS! It didn't disappear people.......IT MERGED WITH ANOTHER CONTINENT! Someone call the History Channel immediately!
 
2013-09-11 10:44:20 PM  
Probably started at Baja and didn't know when to stop drawing.

www.welt-atlas.de
 
2013-09-11 10:45:31 PM  

The Pope of Manwich Village: Learn to swim.


See you down in Arizona Bay.
 
2013-09-11 10:45:51 PM  
images3.cliqueclack.com

i can give you 45 bucks, i have to frame it and pay someone to post it......
 
2013-09-11 10:46:06 PM  
One massive quake from becoming a reality
 
2013-09-11 10:47:07 PM  
17th century?

images3.wikia.nocookie.net

that's the future you're talking about
 
2013-09-11 10:50:27 PM  

Lsherm: Can you imagine how hard it was to draw a farking map before we had airplanes?


Is that how cartographers draw maps? By flying over and tracing them?


Look into surveying, it'll blow your mind.
 
2013-09-11 10:53:38 PM  
I don't have a problem with that. It worked for Snake Plisken.
 
2013-09-11 10:54:52 PM  
I wonder if Junipero Serra and his posse knew that California wasn't an island?
 
2013-09-11 10:57:39 PM  
Meanwhile in Japan around the end of the 1700's Japanese mapmakers were creating maps of extremely high quality.
hanachan62jp.photo-web.cc
 
2013-09-11 10:58:25 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Meanwhile in Japan around the end of the 1700's Japanese mapmakers were creating maps of extremely high quality.
[hanachan62jp.photo-web.cc image 421x463]


Lol... they drew it as an island, too.
 
2013-09-11 10:58:37 PM  
i grew up on that lovely island...it was a great experiment
 
2013-09-11 10:59:02 PM  
If only The Iraq had those maps.
 
2013-09-11 10:59:07 PM  
This was a very popular theory in the mid-1600's that persisted through the mid-1700's.

Bernard de Voto's histories of early America make it plain that it was still thought to be the case until almost 1840.  Not even the Lewis & Clark expedition had much impact on it (though, of course, their route was well north of California).
 
2013-09-11 11:01:01 PM  
i823.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-11 11:03:11 PM  
Does this island involve a frozen donkey wheel?
 
2013-09-11 11:05:42 PM  
cdn.theatlanticwire.com
 
2013-09-11 11:07:36 PM  

The Pope of Manwich Village: Learn to swim


Came for this.
 
2013-09-11 11:08:33 PM  

RoyBatty: If only!


Came here to say exactly this. Taking my leave satisfied. Well done, sir.
 
2013-09-11 11:09:17 PM  

Omnivorous: This was a very popular theory in the mid-1600's that persisted through the mid-1700's.

Bernard de Voto's histories of early America make it plain that it was still thought to be the case until almost 1840.  Not even the Lewis & Clark expedition had much impact on it (though, of course, their route was well north of California).


Most map makers of the time would copy regions from other maps, often copying the errors for centuries.  Interesting stuff, and beautiful compared to todays maps.
 
2013-09-11 11:12:36 PM  
For all we know Cali was an island in the 17th century. Maybe it just recently connected to the US.
 
2013-09-11 11:16:27 PM  
We've been drawing Florida as an island since 1949.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiTM2HQ0g98
 
2013-09-11 11:19:48 PM  
Back then, there was no Google.  All they had was MapQuest.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-09-11 11:23:29 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: For all we know Cali was an island in the 17th century. Maybe it just recently connected to the US.


It certainly hasn't connected with reality.
 
2013-09-11 11:24:42 PM  

Nordschleife: We've been drawing Florida as an island since 1949.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiTM2HQ0g98


Bugs was well ahead of his time.
 
2013-09-11 11:25:55 PM  
Was the Capitol Beanopolis back then too?
 
2013-09-11 11:26:35 PM  
I'm floatin' back to Cali, Cali, Cali
I'm floatin' back to Cali

/hmmm if I don't sink...so
 
2013-09-11 11:26:59 PM  

Omnivorous: This was a very popular theory in the mid-1600's that persisted through the mid-1700's.

Bernard de Voto's histories of early America make it plain that it was still thought to be the case until almost 1840.  Not even the Lewis & Clark expedition had much impact on it (though, of course, their route was well north of California).


It depended upon whose theories/discoveries that the maps were based.  The French cartographers, de l'Isle being the first, reconnected California back to the mainland in their maps around 1700.  The speculation is that the change was based upon the discoveries of the Jesuits who were fairly close to the French.   Anyway, most of the popular map makers of the day aligned their maps to reflect the de l'Isle model by the 1750's.
 
2013-09-11 11:27:37 PM  
Not the bees! NOT THE BEES!
 
2013-09-11 11:33:24 PM  

MurphyMurphy: 17th century?

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 225x316]

that's the future you're talking about


Otisburg? OTISBURG?!?!?!?

i17.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-11 11:33:28 PM  

eyeyeye: The Pope of Manwich Village: Learn to swim

Came for this.


Can someone please explain this?  Every time someone mentions California, someone else mentions learning to swim.  And my Google-fu fails me whenever I run across this apparant meme.  Even a cursory explanation would be helpful so I'm not the only one who doesn't get it and feel like such a Tool.
 
2013-09-11 11:33:32 PM  
Let's link to an article in a Los Angeles newspaper about a map collection at Stanford University - that'll show them Kommiefornians!
 
2013-09-11 11:34:48 PM  

Tank_Fuzzbutt: Was the Capitol Beanopolis back then too?


Believe it or not, there were indigenous Native Americans inhabiting that land back them, too, only they didn't speak Spanish.
 
2013-09-11 11:35:17 PM  
Looking at my globe, it appears everything is an island.
 
2013-09-11 11:35:31 PM  
So, for those not familiar with the legend behind California....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Califia
 
2013-09-11 11:35:41 PM  

TheSwizz: eyeyeye: The Pope of Manwich Village: Learn to swim

Came for this.

Can someone please explain this?  Every time someone mentions California, someone else mentions learning to swim.  And my Google-fu fails me whenever I run across this apparant meme.  Even a cursory explanation would be helpful so I'm not the only one who doesn't get it and feel like such a Tool.


Because I'm praying for rain, and I'm praying for tidal waves.
 
2013-09-11 11:47:18 PM  

skinink: TheSwizz: eyeyeye: The Pope of Manwich Village: Learn to swim

Came for this.

Can someone please explain this?  Every time someone mentions California, someone else mentions learning to swim.  And my Google-fu fails me whenever I run across this apparant meme.  Even a cursory explanation would be helpful so I'm not the only one who doesn't get it and feel like such a Tool.

Because I'm praying for rain, and I'm praying for tidal waves.




see you down in Arizona Bay
www.atomicbooks.com
Yet, I live in this island now. So ifCalifornia slides in to the ocean Like, mystics and statistics say it will
I predict this motel will be standing until I pay my bill.
 
2013-09-12 12:01:21 AM  

Lsherm: Can you imagine how hard it was to draw a farking map before we had airplanes?


The history of cartography is actually fascinating. If you know the distance between two points, and the angle from each of those points to a third, you could determine the exact location of that third point. And doing so repeatedly you could triangulate your way across the country. And the USGS did.

And every time anyone builds a tunnel, or a bridge, or anything of any importance, before any work begins you'll see a person or two with a tripod and a scope looking at something in the distance. What they're doing is locating their site on the USGS map from known markers. Look around, one you know what they look like you'll run into them quite often.

This is how we can build tunnels starting from each end, and have each side come together neatly in the center.


img.geocaching.com
 
2013-09-12 12:05:28 AM  
I'll explain it, but first I have to give you an Ænima.
 
2013-09-12 12:16:51 AM  

ChrisDe: Looking at my globe, it appears everything is an island.


No man is an island.
 
2013-09-12 12:28:53 AM  

Fart_Machine: ChrisDe: Looking at my globe, it appears everything is an island.

No man is an island.


No he's a peninsula.

/Obscure song in a thread featuring a song that's posted in every earthquake thread?
 
2013-09-12 12:35:51 AM  

skinink: TheSwizz: eyeyeye: The Pope of Manwich Village: Learn to swim

Came for this.

Can someone please explain this?  Every time someone mentions California, someone else mentions learning to swim.  And my Google-fu fails me whenever I run across this apparant meme.  Even a cursory explanation would be helpful so I'm not the only one who doesn't get it and feel like such a Tool.

Because I'm praying for rain, and I'm praying for tidal waves.


Pretty sure you dun been trolled.
 
2013-09-12 12:36:57 AM  

StopLurkListen: Lsherm: Can you imagine how hard it was to draw a farking map before we had airplanes?

The history of cartography is actually fascinating. If you know the distance between two points, and the angle from each of those points to a third, you could determine the exact location of that third point. And doing so repeatedly you could triangulate your way across the country. And the USGS did.

And every time anyone builds a tunnel, or a bridge, or anything of any importance, before any work begins you'll see a person or two with a tripod and a scope looking at something in the distance. What they're doing is locating their site on the USGS map from known markers. Look around, one you know what they look like you'll run into them quite often.

This is how we can build tunnels starting from each end, and have each side come together neatly in the center.


[img.geocaching.com image 850x702]


Can you imagine Jefferson trying to get the PLSS going in today's political climate? Hell, the Land Ordinance Act of 1785 that got the ball rolling was passed in the Articles of Confederation era, but I just can't see it happening today...maybe if it were wrapped up in some military funding.

/GISer and Cartographer
//History of cartography is both fascinating and sobering
 
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