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(Mirror.co.uk)   If you can crack this code you could be the next James Bond: AWVLI QIQVT QOSQO ELGCV IIQWD LCUQE EOENN WWOAO LTDNU QTGAW TSMDO QTLAO QSDCH PQQIQ DQQTQ OOTUD BNIQH BHHTD UTEET FDUEA UMORE SQEQE MLTME TIREC LICAI QATUN QRALT ENEIN RKG   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 186
    More: Interesting, GCHQ, Umor, Qosqo, Bletchley Park, Alan Turing  
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4954 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Sep 2013 at 2:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



186 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-11 07:43:42 PM  
Nicely done
 
2013-09-11 07:50:28 PM  
Any guesses of the long-term effects of Britain's entire code and cipher infrastructure being taken over by Farkers?
 
2013-09-11 07:56:04 PM  

meat0918: netweavr: A computer would deserve to be called intelligent if it could deceive a human into believing that it was human www.metro.co.uk/turing?

It takes you to challenge two.


Which appears to be an intelligence challenge.

Q: "Will you download this random file to your computer?"
A: "No."
 
2013-09-11 07:56:21 PM  

mr_a: Any guesses of the long-term effects of Britain's entire code and cipher infrastructure being taken over by Farkers?


This was designed to be fairly easy.
 
2013-09-11 08:28:09 PM  

Head_Shot: Sometimes my fellow farkers impress the hell out of me.

This is one of those times.


This one was fairly easy.  Don't be too impressed.

The columns weren't shuffled via a key, which would have made it more difficult, and the total length was the factor of two primes.  A real message wouldn't be exactly that length, so you'd have to jigger the column lengths until it came out right.
 
2013-09-11 08:29:46 PM  

king of vegas: Nicely done


Thanks.
 
2013-09-11 08:33:30 PM  

dittybopper: AWVLIQIQVTQOS
QOELGCVIIQWDL
CUQEEOENNWWOA
OLTDNUQTGAWTS
MDOQTLAOQSDCH
PQQIQDQQTQOOT
UDBNIQHBHHTDU
TEETFDUEAUMOR
ESQEQEMLTMETI
RECLICAIQATUN
QRALTENEINRKG

Read the columns downward, starting at the first one and going to the right.  The Q's are spaces between the words.

/What do I win?
//I've already done SIGINT, what else you got?


Bravo, Sir!
 
2013-09-11 08:33:48 PM  

micah1701: Boy, are you guys dumb! You guys are so dumb. I got this thing all figured out.


Mister potatohead!  MISTER POTATOHEAD!!!
 
2013-09-11 08:35:31 PM  
Wow dittybopper! That was awesome!
 
2013-09-11 08:36:32 PM  
The content of the file at metro.co.uk/turing:


-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----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-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
 
2013-09-11 08:40:36 PM  

dittybopper: Hopefully, I've redeemed my intellectual credentials on Fark, after my little NPR thread this morning.


You never lost them with me, you pointed out your mistake right away.

/you have no idea how many times I've screwed up a headline
//Subby, who would never know how to crack that code
 
2013-09-11 08:42:30 PM  
They look like RNAV GPS waypoint names.
 
2013-09-11 08:47:42 PM  
Btw: the correct thing to type into the "Answer 1" text field on that website is "turing".
 
2013-09-11 08:55:10 PM  

mr_a: Any guesses of the long-term effects of Britain's entire code and cipher infrastructure being taken over by Farkers?


The Royal Armoured Corps is confused when they receive misspelled, poorly-punctuated orders to invade someplace called "Boobiestan."
 
2013-09-11 09:00:36 PM  

Blues_X: We need Bobby Shaftoe to kick someone's ass and bring us their one-time pad.


Extremely great reference!  I could hardly put that book down, and it really stuck with me.
 
rpm
2013-09-11 09:09:22 PM  

The Voice of Doom: The content of the file at metro.co.uk/turing:


-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----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-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----


That is a key (1022 bits???), and one of the "primes" contains some ASCII text.

ww.whtsisilguoectsrehsri.eocu./klbtehcel y
 
rpm
2013-09-11 09:17:26 PM  

rpm: The Voice of Doom: The content of the file at metro.co.uk/turing:


-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----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-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

That is a key (1022 bits???), and one of the "primes" contains some ASCII text.

ww.whtsisilguoectsrehsri.eocu./klbtehcel y


Which, after decoding for endianess, brings you to challenge 3. http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/bletchley.html
 
2013-09-11 09:31:35 PM  
rpm
Good find!
I was looking into whether they had a service running where you could use that key to authenticate yourself. :)


But what do you mean by "decoding for endianess"?
Just shuffling letters around as I was about to do when I looked at the letters and figured "www..something..gloucestershire" and "maybe something with 'tech' in the end"?
Well, turned out to be "bletchley", not "tech". Figures, what with "turing" being the first answer. :-P
 
2013-09-11 09:56:40 PM  
Probably the next one will reference the colossus.
 
2013-09-11 10:24:35 PM  

Johnny_Canuck: 21-7-b: MY CAPS LOCK KEY IS BROKEN. CONTACT THE IT DEPARTMENT

Have you tried turning it off and on?

- signed IT


Amish IT
 
2013-09-11 10:58:07 PM  
Suck it, Trebek
 
2013-09-11 10:59:37 PM  
Challenge three is hexadecimal, but that's as far as I'm likely to get with it.
 
rpm
2013-09-11 11:10:38 PM  

The Voice of Doom: But what do you mean by "decoding for endianess"?
Just shuffling letters


Swap each pair. It's just a variation of how numbers are coded in Intel. I'm betting that the message was encoded into shorts and the key generated on an Intel machine.
 
rpm
2013-09-11 11:13:49 PM  

2chris2: Challenge three is hexadecimal, but that's as far as I'm likely to get with it.


My current WAG that I haven't had a chance to verify is something encrypted with the public key matching the private key in the last step.
 
2013-09-11 11:14:08 PM  

2chris2: Challenge three is hexadecimal, but that's as far as I'm likely to get with it.


Challenge 3 consists of 256 characters (not counting the slashes at the end of the lines), which is 16*16.

With hexadecimal, I want to see if it's just some ascii code, but the sections of text like "BABF" wouldn't work for that.
 
2013-09-11 11:24:24 PM  

dittybopper: netweavr: A computer would deserve to be called intelligent if it could deceive a human into believing that it was human www.metro.co.uk/turing?

That's it.

It actually stymied me a bit because I'm not used to working with transposition ciphers, but two things clued me in, both from  Theaetetus:

You may be on to something. If you pull out the Q's, the frequency distribution is exactly what you'd expect for English.

As an additional clue, minus those Qs, it's 123 characters, which is 41*3.

Pulling the Q's gives the right frequency distribution for English, but Theaetetus made the mistake of pulling them when checking the factors.  When I saw the factor thing, combined with the distribution, it made me think "TRANSPOSITION!".



Aw, thanks, and yes, I did. I was playing around with arrangements of 3x41, trying square arrangements, etc. Stupid Qs.What got me thinking in that direction was a SF novel by James P. Hogan that had a copy of the Jesus on a Hypercube painting by Dali on the cover. Aliens transmit a serial message that happens to have a length equal to the multiple of two primes. Arrange the stream in a square, print it on circuit boards, and... I won't spoil the rest. But once I saw it wasn't a prime number of characters, I started thinking square.Full credit to you, though. Also, this is just the first clue. What's at the URL?
 
2013-09-11 11:35:49 PM  

rpm: rpm: The Voice of Doom: The content of the file at metro.co.uk/turing:


-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
MIIC2gIBAAKBgDfABK8+joDLdbFTDJ+y3PTTzkqCi1L2qEjgxdg1iyZshJTeKUck
...
gmteC4felYL/2FTAmT8=
-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

That is a key (1022 bits???), and one of the "primes" contains some ASCII text.

ww.whtsisilguoectsrehsri.eocu./klbtehcel y

Which, after decoding for endianess, brings you to challenge 3. http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/bletchley.html


I'm late to this party, but thank you, because my eyes might have glazed over the that-sure-as-hell-doesnt-look-like-a-prime-number-to-me prime2. But having started at challenge 3, that bunch of hex digits represents a 128-byte file. 1024 bits. That can't be a coincidence.

Taking a second look at the key from challenge 2, we know the modulus (37:c0:04...), the public exponent (0x10001), the private exponent (13:5b:5d...), and we have 1024 mysterious bits. If we assume the 1024 bits is cyphertext, and we decrypt (via this nifty web interface for those playing along at home) we get the following hex/ASCII.

00000000 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 77 77 2E 77 68 74 72 65 ww.whtre
^B 67 65 73 69 65 74 2E 72 6F 63 75 2E 2F 6B 6E 65 gesiet.rocu./kne
00000020 67 69 61 6D 30 32 33 31 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 giam0231

Which, after correcting again for endianness, yields http://www.theregister.co.uk/enigma2013. Ooh, pretty!
 
2013-09-11 11:53:33 PM  

dittybopper: Jekylman: Remove Q's, and then anagramize among the word islands

AWVLII  TO SOLVE GCVII   CLUE ONE, ONE WOULD WANT


...and that's as far as I got

You were headed in the wrong direction.  It's a simple 13 column, 11 row transposition cipher with the Q's acting as nulls:

AWVLIQIQVTQOS
QOELGCVIIQWDL
CUQEEOENNWWOA
OLTDNUQTGAWTS
MDOQTLAOQSDCH
PQQIQDQQTQOOT
UDBNIQHBHHTDU
TEETFDUEAUMOR
ESQEQEMLTMETI
RECLICAIQATUN
QRALTENEINRKG

Becomes this:

AWVLI I VT OS
 OELGCVII WDL
CU EEOENNWWOA
OLTDNU TGAWTS
MDO TLAO SDCH
P  I D  T OOT
UDBNI HBHHTDU
TEETFDUEAUMOR
ES E EMLTMETI
RECLICAI ATUN
 RALTENEINRKG

Reading the columns down, from left to right, you get:

A COMPUTER WOULD DESERVE TO BE CALLED INTELLIGENT IF IT COULD DECEIVE A HUMAN INTO BELIEVING THAT IT WAS HUMAN WWW DOT METRO DOT CO DOT UK SLASH TURING


SOOOPAH GENIUSSSS
 
2013-09-12 12:05:23 AM  
OK, I know a .JPG is supposed to end in 0xff 0xd9, which it does, but that padding seems... weird. Suspecting stego of some sort, and the repeating 63 18 C6 31 (when translated to binary) is also odd. Two ones, three zeroes, two ones, three zeroes... File is 62468 bytes long. I wonder if...

$ outguess -k "NOPE" -r challenge4.jpg challenge4.txt
Reading challenge4.jpg....
Extracting usable bits: 48722 bits
Steg retrieve: seed: 56225, len: 40661
Extracted datalen is too long: 40661 > 6091

$ outguess -k "Spoileralert" -r comp3.jpg challenge4.out
Reading challenge4.jpg....
Extracting usable bits: 48722 bits
Steg retrieve: seed: 1627, len: 2250

It's 2250 bytes long, begins with 0xb3 0xF1... and ends with 0x69 0x98, whatever it is and now I'm stumped. 18000 bits. That's a not-very-computery number. I wonder if it's a bitmap. BRB.
 
2013-09-12 12:11:05 AM  
Didn't decode anything but the correct answer to number 4 is Colossus.  It works on the entry page.  I just know the name of the computer in the jpeg.   Doesn't get us the url for challenge 5  but    4 should end in     www.blahblahblha/Colossus   if pattern holds
 
2013-09-12 12:24:08 AM  

holden1978: Didn't decode anything but the correct answer to number 4 is Colossus.  It works on the entry page.  I just know the name of the computer in the jpeg.   Doesn't get us the url for challenge 5  but    4 should end in     www.blahblahblha/Colossus   if pattern holds


nice work :) it's www.standard.co.uk/colossus

Which will give the last answer
 
2013-09-12 12:25:36 AM  

holden1978: Didn't decode anything but the correct answer to number 4 is Colossus.  It works on the entry page.  I just know the name of the computer in the jpeg.   Doesn't get us the url for challenge 5  but    4 should end in     www.blahblahblha.co.uk/Colossus   if pattern holds


;)

/and actually, knowing that you're looking for ".co.uk/" or "dotcodotukslash" might help find the plaintext.
 
2013-09-12 12:34:43 AM  
Here's a hint:
Jpeg images begin with the bytepairs FF D8 FF E(0|1)

A common image obscuring technique is to take two images and overlay them with one having its white/black pixels acting as a transparency. Overlay one over the other...

There are 2 images in one....
 
2013-09-12 12:37:05 AM  

DuudeStanky: holden1978: Didn't decode anything but the correct answer to number 4 is Colossus.  It works on the entry page.  I just know the name of the computer in the jpeg.   Doesn't get us the url for challenge 5  but    4 should end in     www.blahblahblha/Colossus   if pattern holds

nice work :) it's www.standard.co.uk/colossus

Which will give the last answer


Hmm... Source there looks mighty interesting.
 
2013-09-12 12:39:26 AM  
I AM LORD VOLDEMORT
 
2013-09-12 12:53:27 AM  
Ok I get the whitespace thing... but how do you copy it from the source to tell what is a space, tab or cr? and 5k lines on a JS page is a bit excessive.
 
2013-09-12 12:56:54 AM  

paleryder69: Ok I get the whitespace thing... but how do you copy it from the source to tell what is a space, tab or cr? and 5k lines on a JS page is a bit excessive.


Save the image to your desktop. get a hex editor like HxD and open the image with that. Search for hex FF D8 FF E0. Search twice.
The second image starts at the second set of those bytes. Select to the end of the file, copy, paste into a new file and save as comp4jpg
Then take a look at it.
 
2013-09-12 12:58:58 AM  

DuudeStanky: paleryder69: Ok I get the whitespace thing... but how do you copy it from the source to tell what is a space, tab or cr? and 5k lines on a JS page is a bit excessive.

Save the image to your desktop. get a hex editor like HxD and open the image with that. Search for hex FF D8 FF E0. Search twice.
The second image starts at the second set of those bytes. Select to the end of the file, copy, paste into a new file and save as comp4jpg
Then take a look at it.


Oh oops, thought you were looking at the image one. Ignore me :)
 
2013-09-12 01:00:45 AM  
Twilight Farkle
Taking a second look at the key from challenge 2, we know the modulus (37:c0:04...), the public exponent (0x10001), the private exponent (13:5b:5d...), and we have 1024 mysterious bits. If we assume the 1024 bits is cyphertext, and we decrypt (via this nifty web interface for those playing along at home) we get the following hex/ASCII.


Do you or someone else know how to decrypt that one on the command line?
Because I got an error(*) when I tried doing it earlier with:

openssl rsautl -in /tmp/input.bin -inkey /tmp/comp1.key -decrypt

where /tmp/input.bin is the cyphertext as a binary:

> xxd input.bin
0000000: 2910 404c 21cf 8bf4 cc93 b7d4 a518 babf ).@L!...........
0000010: 34b4 2a8a b004 7627 998d 633e 653a f63a 4.*...v'..c>e:.:
0000020: 873c 8fab be8d 095e d125 d453 9706 9324 .<.....^.%.S...$
0000030: 25e7 8c26 1e2a b927 3d17 7578 f20e 38af %..&.*.'=.ux..8.
0000040: ef12 4e06 8d23 0ba6 4aeb 8ff8 0256 ea01 ..N..#..J....V..
0000050: 5aa3 bff1 02fe 652a 4cbd 33b4 036f 519e Z.....e*L.3..oQ.
0000060: 5899 316a 6250 840d 141b 8535 ab56 0bdc X.1jbP.....5.V..
0000070: bde8 a67a 09b7 c97c b2fa 308d ffba d9f9 ...z...|..0.....

---
(*)
RSA operation error
139803526198952:error:0306E06C:bignum routines:BN_mod_inverse:no inverse:bn_gcd.c:492:
 
2013-09-12 01:01:43 AM  

paleryder69: Ok I get the whitespace thing... but how do you copy it from the source to tell what is a space, tab or cr? and 5k lines on a JS page is a bit excessive.


Copy, paste-as-plain-text in Word, then turn on invisibles? Worked for me.

Now, it's not specifically in whitespace, but I think it's relevant.  There are a lot of repeated values of space-space or tab-tab-space-space or the like, so my guess is you'd then want to convert each line value into something else for decoding, rather than attempting to directly equate them to letters. And remember, we're probably looking for "*.co.uk/*" in the middle.
 
2013-09-12 01:07:45 AM  
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but it looks like every line in the code that begins with spaces begins with a multiple of 2 spaces.
 
2013-09-12 01:09:05 AM  

DuudeStanky: Then take a look at it.


I was talking about the source code for the 5th one. it is obvious they embedded some kind of whitespace code in the javascript section of the html 5k lines worth... but the decryptions of such is a headscratcher at the moment as whitespace code requires you differentiate between spaces, line breaks, tabs etc. while it is all contained in the hex I am not so sure it can be copied out.
 
2013-09-12 01:11:44 AM  
It could actually be a red herring - some terrible code editor application could indent every child line by 2 spaces. That would be consistent with some of the HTML nesting.
 
2013-09-12 01:16:45 AM  

paleryder69: but the decryptions of such is a headscratcher at the moment as whitespace code requires you differentiate between spaces, line breaks, tabs etc. while it is all contained in the hex I am not so sure it can be copied out.


paste-as-plain-text in Word, then do a find-replace for ^t for [tab] or whatever you like. Similar with the spaces and carriage returns.
 
2013-09-12 01:19:45 AM  
paleryder69
I was talking about the source code for the 5th one. it is obvious they embedded some kind of whitespace code in the javascript section of the html 5k lines worth... but the decryptions of such is a headscratcher at the moment as whitespace code requires you differentiate between spaces, line breaks, tabs etc. while it is all contained in the hex I am not so sure it can be copied out.


Could also be the number of whitespaces per line that's encoding numbers.

Or some drawing/thumb cinema/ASCII art sort of thing - excerpt:
i.imgur.com

;-)
 
2013-09-12 01:22:26 AM  

dittybopper: AWVLIQIQVTQOS
QOELGCVIIQWDL
CUQEEOENNWWOA
OLTDNUQTGAWTS
MDOQTLAOQSDCH
PQQIQDQQTQOOT
UDBNIQHBHHTDU
TEETFDUEAUMOR
ESQEQEMLTMETI
RECLICAIQATUN
QRALTENEINRKG

Read the columns downward, starting at the first one and going to the right.  The Q's are spaces between the words.

/What do I win?
//I've already done SIGINT, what else you got?


I bow to your superior knowledge!!!
 
2013-09-12 01:25:58 AM  

paleryder69: DuudeStanky: Then take a look at it.

I was talking about the source code for the 5th one. it is obvious they embedded some kind of whitespace code in the javascript section of the html 5k lines worth... but the decryptions of such is a headscratcher at the moment as whitespace code requires you differentiate between spaces, line breaks, tabs etc. while it is all contained in the hex I am not so sure it can be copied out.


Maybe I just got lucky or something, but the 5th and final answer was displayed right in front of me on the webpage, with a clickable link and everything..
Entering in what I saw on the main page validated successfully and I was entered into the draw.

It doesn't appear in a big blue box for you guys?
 
2013-09-12 01:30:38 AM  
I

DuudeStanky: It doesn't appear in a big blue box for you guys?


I take it you filled in an answer in each of the 5 boxes? Also I am in the States... the rules state you gotta be a UK resident.. maybe they allow Canucks to participate but I bet the site discriminates against Yanks
 
2013-09-12 01:34:38 AM  
can't enter, not a UK citizen.  Was still fun
 
2013-09-12 01:36:07 AM  
Yes, the link yields a pop-up, but the validation does not work for me.... 

It also seems to me that following a link is not much of a challenge.

meh
 
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