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(Yahoo)   Intelligent life may now be possible in California   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 20
    More: Cool, California, Earth, origin of life, hydrothermal vents, electronic components  
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6241 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2013 at 9:34 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-10 09:41:31 AM
i527.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-10 09:46:15 AM
Meteorite discovered at Sutter's mill, site of the 1849 gold rush, I'm not saying it was aliens.....
 
2013-09-10 09:51:48 AM
Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?
 
2013-09-10 09:51:49 AM
alextcooks.com
 
2013-09-10 09:54:32 AM

TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?


Quiet you, the empire is monitoring.
 
2013-09-10 09:55:31 AM

TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?


Is this a troll? There's tons of theories about it being a planet that was destroyed/didn't finish forming in the early solar system. Just not enough research/evidence to back it up so it mostly gets carted around conspiracy websites as planet X or something.
 
2013-09-10 10:08:03 AM
Damn centers of art, culture and technology!
 
2013-09-10 10:11:48 AM

Esroc: TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?

Is this a troll? There's tons of theories about it being a planet that was destroyed/didn't finish forming in the early solar system. Just not enough research/evidence to back it up so it mostly gets carted around conspiracy websites as planet X or something.


Yeah, but do any of them mention a death star?
 
2013-09-10 10:15:11 AM

TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?


Because the combined mass of all the asteroids something like a 4% of our moon. The belt is basically leftover junk that has fallen into an region of orbital stability near Jupiter.
 
2013-09-10 10:19:41 AM

TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?


There isn't enough mass there to have made up a planet.
 
2013-09-10 10:32:41 AM
Great - a new tax revenue stream!
 
2013-09-10 10:39:09 AM

Ned Stark: TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?

There isn't enough mass there to have made up a planet.


Duh, it was vaporized. Study it out.
 
2013-09-10 10:42:30 AM

Mad_Radhu: TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?

Because the combined mass of all the asteroids something like a 4% of our moon. The belt is basically leftover junk that has fallen into an region of orbital stability near Jupiter.


And thankfully enough Jupiter exists/ed to throw these objects either into stability away from us or consume them entirely. When you think about the number of conditions required to allow our lives to exist it really does baffle the mind on how the universe hasn't snuffed us out yet.

Good for us though, we're doing a bang up job of doing it ourselves though!
 
2013-09-10 11:10:55 AM

Ned Stark: There isn't enough mass there to have made up a planet.


Yes there is. The current minimum definition of planet is that a) It orbits a star, b) has enough gravity to cause it to reach hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e., roughly spherical), and c) has "cleared out" its local neighbourhood.  Ceres passes both a & b but fails c.  If Ceres could somehow suck in (or eject) the other 2/3 of the asteroid belt, it would be a planet.  A very small planet, but a planet nonetheless.
 
2013-09-10 11:34:05 AM

snarfyboy: Ned Stark: There isn't enough mass there to have made up a planet.

Yes there is. The current minimum definition of planet is that a) It orbits a star, b) has enough gravity to cause it to reach hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e., roughly spherical), and c) has "cleared out" its local neighbourhood.  Ceres passes both a & b but fails c.  If Ceres could somehow suck in (or eject) the other 2/3 of the asteroid belt, it would be a planet.  A very small planet, but a planet nonetheless.


They should probably have qualified it as an Earth sized planet. Adding up Ceres, Vesta, and all the rest still only gets you up to a tiny fraction of the Moon's mass. Yes, it Ceres is considered a dwarf planet, but it would be a tiny one compared to many of the moons in the solar system.
 
2013-09-10 12:03:39 PM

Mad_Radhu: They should probably have qualified it as an Earth sized planet. Adding up Ceres, Vesta, and all the rest still only gets you up to a tiny fraction of the Moon's mass. Yes, it Ceres is considered a dwarf planet, but it would be a tiny one compared to many of the moons in the solar system.


That's true it would be a very small planet. But Earth size is not a good qualifier, as it's the largest of the terrestrial planets. Venus is close enough to be negligible, but Mars is considerably smaller. Then there's Mercury. Ganymede and Titan are bigger than Mercury (although less massive, Mercury is mostly iron).  So being smaller than a moon doesn't disqualify you from being a planet.
 
2013-09-10 12:16:20 PM
Esroc


>>>> TwowheelinTim: Am I the only one who wonders why there is a planet sized gap between Mars and Jupiter that is
>>>> full of billions of fragments of rock? I've never heard anything remotely suggesting those fragments could be what's
>>>> left of a planet that was destroyed by the death star. Why is that?

Is this a troll? There's tons of theories about it being a planet that was destroyed/didn't finish forming in the early solar system. Just not enough research/evidence to back it up so it mostly gets carted around conspiracy websites as planet X or something.


Not a troll, that's exactly what these conspiracy nuts think. "I don't know......so it must be < insert batshiat theory >" then claim "main stream" scientists aren't looking into it.
 
2013-09-10 12:19:56 PM

snarfyboy: Mad_Radhu: They should probably have qualified it as an Earth sized planet. Adding up Ceres, Vesta, and all the rest still only gets you up to a tiny fraction of the Moon's mass. Yes, it Ceres is considered a dwarf planet, but it would be a tiny one compared to many of the moons in the solar system.

That's true it would be a very small planet. But Earth size is not a good qualifier, as it's the largest of the terrestrial planets. Venus is close enough to be negligible, but Mars is considerably smaller. Then there's Mercury. Ganymede and Titan are bigger than Mercury (although less massive, Mercury is mostly iron).  So being smaller than a moon doesn't disqualify you from being a planet.


I was thinking more from the standpoint of being something more interesting than a dead piece of rock. Once you get up past Mars size you have the possibility of life, which is relevant to organic material that TFA was discussing.
 
2013-09-10 12:26:08 PM

Mad_Radhu: I was thinking more from the standpoint of being something more interesting than a dead piece of rock. Once you get up past Mars size you have the possibility of life, which is relevant to organic material that TFA was discussing.


There is currently discussion that Ceres could harbor life as it is suspected to be largely water and like Europa, may have a subsurface ocean.  It lacks any obvious heat sources of course, but we are constantly surprised but what we find out there.
 
2013-09-10 04:10:49 PM

snarfyboy: Mad_Radhu: I was thinking more from the standpoint of being something more interesting than a dead piece of rock. Once you get up past Mars size you have the possibility of life, which is relevant to organic material that TFA was discussing.

There is currently discussion that Ceres could harbor life as it is suspected to be largely water and like Europa, may have a subsurface ocean.  It lacks any obvious heat sources of course, but we are constantly surprised but what we find out there.


Hell, we're constantly surprised by what we find here.

I imagine the universe has been rather creative out there if our planet is even a vague indication the adaptability of life.
 
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