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(Salon)   Let's face it, deep down we all secretly love our parent's horrible taste in music   (salon.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, music release, Poker Face, background music, Black Eyed Peas  
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6112 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2013 at 12:23 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-09-09 11:33:54 PM
6 votes:
Deep down we are all imprinted with the music we hear from age 10 to age 17.
2013-09-10 01:07:57 AM
5 votes:
My father was a semi-pro musician.  He played trumpet with Tommy Dorsey, Glen Miller, Benny Goodman, and Gene Krupa.  I do love some of that music, just as I love  some of the music from my own childhood in the 1960s-1980s. But if I'm being honest with myself, there was a lot more crap released than great music, and that's true of every era.

What gets preserved and passed along to the next generation are the few "gems" that are released.  The majority of songs, even the ones that are hits, are soon forgotten.  In 2033, nobody is going to be singing "Friday" or "Gangnam Style" or whatever a Justin Beiber is, because those are forgettable.

If you grew up in the 1960s, you remember The Beatles, The Stones, The Beach Boys, and The Doors.  You have probably forgotten Little Joey and the Flips, Unit 4+2, and Whistling Jack Smith.

If you grew up in the 1970s, you remember Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and maybe T-Rex, The Ramones, The Clash, and the Sex Pistols.  You've forgotten Paul Humphrey and the Cool Aid Chemists, Jud Strunk, and the Wilton Place Street Band.

You remember The Police and REM from the 1980s, but you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats.  You remember Nirvana and Sound Garden from the 1990s, but you've forgotten N2Deep and Masta Ace Incorporated.

The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present.  It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.

Also, while we're on the subject, onions on my belt, get off my lawn, kids today with their hippin' and hoppin, and bippin' and boppin.  Get me a jell-o pudding pop, uphill both ways in the snow and furthermore comma.
2013-09-09 11:39:05 PM
5 votes:
this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?
2013-09-10 01:39:03 AM
3 votes:
The thing that most confuses me about my parents is how the music they listen to is frozen in stone. Dad listens to one radio station (Rock 102) that near as I can tell has played the exact same 100 or so songs every single day since around 1985 or so. I'm pretty sure the poor man has heard shiat like Fly Like An Eagle and Life in the Fast Lane literally ten thousand times.

I get that you like what was around when you were young, but holy shiat that's like 15-20 years of music. You deserve more than 100 songs.
2013-09-10 12:47:31 AM
3 votes:

Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


All kinds of good stuff that isn't pop music is what's left.  Seriously, anything you're into is all there, vibrant as ever, and excellent.  You just need to put some effort into finding it.  Luckily, we've got a host of places that anyone can share their stuff.  Spend some time looking through youtube (there are entire albums on there from all kinds of artists), pandora, grooveshark, spotify, etc.
2013-09-10 12:28:46 AM
3 votes:
I love my horrible taste in music. Lisa Lisa, the Cover Girls, T'Pau, Cathy Denis.
2013-09-10 12:26:42 AM
3 votes:
I was raised in a moderately strict Lutheran household and music wasn't my parents thing. The only time I'd hear music was a mixture of Glenn Campbell and church hymns. I'm glad I found Slayer and Metallica in 1985.
2013-09-10 12:25:38 AM
3 votes:
my dad liked "Big Girls Dont Cry" and "Brand New Key".

my mom liked the Beatles and Creedence. My mom had excellent taste in music!
2013-09-09 11:43:14 PM
3 votes:

Mztlplx: I grew up listening to Delta blues and bebop jazz.  And while those aren't my usual taste in music today (metal), I still love 'em.  Gave me a basis for musical appreciation, it did.

/thanks Dad


And my daughter (now 16) picked up a taste for the Ramones and Stevie Ray Vaughan from me.

/the circle of life......
2013-09-10 12:56:31 AM
2 votes:
My parents gave me a deep love of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Santana, and Bonnie Raitt. They like bluesy rock music. Nothing wrong with that.
2013-09-10 12:38:21 AM
2 votes:
I have to admit, if a Billy Joel song comes on the radio, I am compelled to listen. That was my mom's doing. At some point she figured out that all us boys shut up when she played her Billy Joel cassette on road trips.
2013-09-10 12:36:55 AM
2 votes:
It's basically like David Chappelle said, the electric guitar is the instrument that speaks to the soul of the white person.
2013-09-09 11:41:44 PM
2 votes:
I grew up listening to Delta blues and bebop jazz.  And while those aren't my usual taste in music today (metal), I still love 'em.  Gave me a basis for musical appreciation, it did.

/thanks Dad
2013-09-10 10:06:35 AM
1 votes:

StreetlightInTheGhetto: My Dad raised me on the Clash, Pretenders, and Joe Jackson


Your dad has great taste in music. All of that stuff is awesome.
2013-09-10 09:56:13 AM
1 votes:
My Mom is a big Weird Al fan, going back to Another One Rides the Bus.

I never had a chance of a normal life.
2013-09-10 09:30:47 AM
1 votes:
My Dad raised me on the Clash, Pretenders, and Joe Jackson, and bought me tickets for Sigur Ros/The National/Dismemberment Plan (yay!)/etc this weekend.  We're 110% cool.

I still hate my Mom's taste in music, which ranges from Rod Stewart to Christmas Tunes.  We could agree on the oldies station, but they've started working in the worst of the 80s into their rotation.
2013-09-10 09:21:28 AM
1 votes:

Bedurndurn: The thing that most confuses me about my parents is how the music they listen to is frozen in stone. Dad listens to one radio station (Rock 102) that near as I can tell has played the exact same 100 or so songs every single day since around 1985 or so. I'm pretty sure the poor man has heard shiat like Fly Like An Eagle and Life in the Fast Lane literally ten thousand times.

I get that you like what was around when you were young, but holy shiat that's like 15-20 years of music. You deserve more than 100 songs.




I remember being puzzled by this when I would listen to classic rock stations. What I decided was that the reason they never play some of the more obscure songs by these artists is that it would defeat the entire reason for the stations existence. This is music as a security blanket; to perform that function, all of the songs have to be ones the listeners know by heart. A less popular Pink Floyd or Yes song would be disturbingly unfamiliar. An old unknown song is really just as bad as a new unknown song. The people choosing to listen to these stations don't want novelty. The concept of a top 40 of classic rock songs is a strange one. The Bob stations around the country are just about as bad. Sure, every now and then they'll throw in a song by The Cure, or New Order, but it's always Blue Monday, or Like An Angel.
2013-09-10 09:05:42 AM
1 votes:
lh3.googleusercontent.com
Thanks, Dad!

/no, really......Thanks!!
2013-09-10 08:09:02 AM
1 votes:
My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.
2013-09-10 06:57:02 AM
1 votes:
My dad went from Beatles to ZZ Top. Its my mom's taste in music that sucked.
2013-09-10 06:56:21 AM
1 votes:
My parents listened to the classical music station on the radio. It's the background sound of my childhood, masking the silence that was my parents unwillingness/inability to communicate with each other. To this day, hearing classical music fills me with low-level anxiety and a general feeling of despair.
2013-09-10 06:43:48 AM
1 votes:
My children are doomed.  Dad is playing 70-80's heavy metal on constant rotation in his car, and I swing from Neil Diamond to Hank Jr. and Merle Haggard, with some Alice Cooper thrown in, in mine.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA!
2013-09-10 02:27:22 AM
1 votes:

Don't Troll Me Bro!: TuteTibiImperes: I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing. Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.


I agree, some of my favorite songs are ones that were never released as singles.  Some albums certainly have some filler, I'll admit, but overall there are usually some gems that never get air play.

I picked up one of my favorite albums ever from a 99 cent CD bin at Circuit City over ten years ago, almost every track is gold.  I'm not sure if any of it ever had big airplay since it was originally released when I was 8, but I'm glad I decided 'what the hell, it's cheap' and picked it up.   House of Freaks - Tantilla.
2013-09-10 02:19:15 AM
1 votes:
I had a science teacher in 6th grade, Mr. Wilson. Huge Harry Chapin fan...one quiz we had was on the lyrics for Cat's in the Cradle. The one question that sticks out still, "when the son is giving his dad excuses why he can't visit, what did he say his kids were sick with?".

I took my kids to see The Police on their tour, good times!
2013-09-10 02:17:20 AM
1 votes:
I got Pink Floyd, Sabbath, Enya, Clannad, Supertramp, Alan Parsons Project, and Dusty Springfield.

/hiphop head
2013-09-10 02:16:22 AM
1 votes:

Don't Troll Me Bro!: I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.


You're listening to the wrong radio. There is good radio out there. Clear Channel does not own it.
2013-09-10 02:14:54 AM
1 votes:
Sorry Subby, but I will never tolerate the BeeGees, let alone enjoy them.
2013-09-10 01:47:05 AM
1 votes:

Don't Troll Me Bro!: Tell me the ensuing beejay was worth it.  It better have been awesome to go through that shiat.

[oceanup.com image 545x574]

[southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com image 792x612]


Pfftt fark no. I was a chick who just moved to a new school in my junior year of highschool. My mom found out all the girls were going together to this NSync concert in Detroit and she thought it would be a great way for me to make friends. All I really learned was who I DID NOT want to be friends with. Surrounded by twatwaffles and I'm in, like, cargo shorts and a Styx shirt going WTF the entire concert. It was sold out! Like fifty thousand screaming fourteen year olds! I walked out of that tour through hell with my ears ringing so loud I could barely hear, which no metal show has ever done to me even when I shoved to the front. *shudder*

/Seen Styx twice, BB King, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Iced Earth, Opeth twice, Rob Zombie twice, Ozzy..
//.. Symphony X, Black Label Society, Dope, Flyleaf, Type O Negative, Queensryche, Pat Benatar, Mannheim Steamrollers..
///and so on, list not in chronological order
2013-09-10 01:36:49 AM
1 votes:

zez: the 5 year old likes more AC/DC type rock.



Now that's a cool kid.
2013-09-10 01:34:02 AM
1 votes:
Being an old Farker, I got a lot of the 50s-60s stuff, Elvis and the Beatles, But I also grew up in a household that played a lot of Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr, and Al Martino.

When my folks died, I inherited their old albums, and still pull them out once in a while to give them a listen.
2013-09-10 01:24:23 AM
1 votes:
My mom saw The Doors, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and so on live in Los Angeles in the 60s. Her music history is enviable.
2013-09-10 01:20:30 AM
1 votes:
My dad's albums were Bob Newhart, Bill Cosby, and Jonathan Winters. Funny stuff still.
2013-09-10 01:12:55 AM
1 votes:
My dad knows more about classical music -- and musicians -- than I'll ever know, plus he still has the Benny Goodman 78s that he purchased on leave during WWII.  And he designed and built his own hi-fi system out of war-surplus hardware in the late 40s, to play the then-new LP records.  I can only aspire to those levels of coolness.
2013-09-10 12:57:05 AM
1 votes:
My Dad's record/cd collection got me into Peter Gabriel, Phil Collins, Dire Straits, Chris DeBurgh, classical music

My Uncle got me into Yes, Genesis, ELP, Sex Pistols, King Crimson, Talking Heads, Brian Eno, Robert Fripp, Tangerine Dream, Joy Division
2013-09-10 12:50:52 AM
1 votes:
All things considered, the music at home could have been a lot worse than this:

upload.wikimedia.org

upload.wikimedia.org
2013-09-10 12:45:03 AM
1 votes:
I grew up with my folks blaring Led Zeppelin, The Doors, and Janis Joplin. I never thought their taste in music was horrible. Unless you mean horribly awesome.
2013-09-10 12:42:30 AM
1 votes:
I got my son interested in Tom Waits.
All downhill from here...
2013-09-10 12:41:11 AM
1 votes:
My dad was all Weavers and Joan Baez and Dylan and the Eagles...until he heard Culture Club when I was in high school and then he was all about the Karma Chameleon.

Daaaaaaaaaad!  You are so embarrassing!

"Groovy," he said.  Oh, my god.  I love him now--my teenage years, it was a little bumpy.
2013-09-10 12:38:46 AM
1 votes:
my father introduced me to sabbath, floyd, led zep, the band, etc.  can't complain
2013-09-10 12:34:17 AM
1 votes:
My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.


snuff3r: My poor kids.. they get an ecclectic mix of 70-80s music via their mother and really, really heavy shiat via me.

Though my kids tell me they hate my music I have to admit pride when I catch my 2yo daughter "dancing" to Slayer or Gojira or whatever i'm listening to.


How does one dance to Gojira?  Are you sure that your music doesn't actually send the child into seizures?
2013-09-10 12:32:51 AM
1 votes:
Freddy Fender? Boots Randolf? Polkas? Nah. I like my horrible music much better.
2013-09-10 12:32:02 AM
1 votes:

Cewley: then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


I'm sorry, are you claiming that running scales between :teeth clench: every. god. damned note. isn't a talent?  Son, you are whiter than mayo on Wonder Bread.

/I tot... tota.. mmmmm nynanan, mmmmynana.. totalyyyy huh heuyuyuyuyuyuyu agree.
//I said I uuuuuha agREEuh with you-a. I. I saw uh I uh, I totally agree with you-wuwuwuwuwuwuw.
2013-09-10 12:29:13 AM
1 votes:

KinetiKiteniK: I was raised in a moderately strict Lutheran household and music wasn't my parents thing. The only time I'd hear music was a mixture of Glenn Campbell and church hymns. I'm glad I found Slayer and Metallica in 1985.


Glenn Campbell was an amazing guitarist and vocalist, and was more rock n roll cocaine fueled asshole than metallica or slayer.
2013-09-10 12:29:04 AM
1 votes:
The only music that was allowed in our house was Elvis and country like Freddie Fender and Jeanie Pruett. I don't prefer it, but I tolerate it just the same as most music. The only stuff I can't stand is Polka.
2013-09-10 12:26:36 AM
1 votes:
What does the fox say?
2013-09-10 12:26:30 AM
1 votes:
I secretly love gospel? Somehow I doubt it.
2013-09-10 12:00:52 AM
1 votes:
My step-father was into things like Nelson Eddie and Jeanette McDonald

/wasn't real fond of it
//but I can name Indian Love Call in two notes
 
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