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(Salon)   Let's face it, deep down we all secretly love our parent's horrible taste in music   (salon.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, music release, Poker Face, background music, Black Eyed Peas  
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6234 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2013 at 12:23 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-10 03:23:10 AM  

Oldiron_79: LewDux: Kuta: What does the fox say?

"Nixon and Reagan eras had the best music"

So vote Republican?

Also Shrub Sr was POTUS when the Seatle stuff broke back east circa 92.


So blame Bush?
 
2013-09-10 03:23:21 AM  
Which parent, subby?
 
2013-09-10 03:25:51 AM  

OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.


Yessir, and then some.
 
2013-09-10 03:25:58 AM  

Raging Whore Moans: Which parent, subby?


Ooh, good point.  My parents were divorced.  My mom went on to put herself through school as a cocktail waitress in a jazz nightclub.  She tended to date jazz musicians at that time.  Unfortunately, I was too young to really appreciate jazz at that time.

/lived with my dad and the biatch he married
//the biatch had the worst possible taste in music imaginable
 
2013-09-10 03:28:41 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.


d2heru13qkbk4q.cloudfront.net

/you really want the whole album?
 
2013-09-10 03:31:29 AM  
Um, no. My mother, bless her heart, is the most tasteless music listener I know, and that includes my 12yo niece. My father? Well, he did get me into Beethoven, but now he spends his retirement years seeing the most cheesy shows and musicals out there. To me it's sad, because with his money he could be supporting real art and talent, but that only happens when I take him to something.

My older siblings, OTOH, have very solid taste. My older brothers followed Zeppelin, Metallica, etc. from the very beginning. My sister had her 80's hair and glam-rock years, but since she's been very astute.
 
2013-09-10 03:41:52 AM  
Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Herb Albert, The Kingston Trio and Johnny Cash, yes. Perry Como and other not-rock'n'roll '50s easy-listening, not so much.

Discovered early rock'n'roll without their help (they were both born in '43, just slightly pre-Boomer).

Discovered swing and big band through my grandparents.

Much prefer my grandparents music to my parents music.

/Artie Shaw & Louis Prima FTW
 
2013-09-10 03:46:03 AM  

OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.



During summers when I was a kid, I used to go with Dad. The shop area always had one of two stations playing non stop. One was classic country, the other was an oldies station that was heavy on Motown. Needless to say, I grew an early fondness for Motown, especially Smokey Robinson.

Later, in my 20s, I discovered just what a panty remover Smokey's music really is.
 
2013-09-10 03:47:11 AM  

stoli n coke: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.


During summers when I was a kid, I used to go with Dad to his work. The shop area always had one of two stations playing non stop. One was classic country, the other was an oldies station that was heavy on Motown. Needless to say, I grew an early fondness for Motown, especially Smokey Robinson.

Later, in my 20s, I discovered just what a panty remover Smokey's music really is.



FTFM
 
2013-09-10 03:49:11 AM  

Duck_of_Doom: TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

Didn't the music industry start out issuing singles?  It seems that we're going back to where we started - one track to catch interest.  It has some positive aspects: no more filler tracks.  Buy only what you want, not $10-15 for one or two good songs and never listen to the whole album.

On the other hand, some albums had gems that weren't played on air.  Occasionally, the singles were the weaker songs.  The continuous play of a concept album will be gone also. While it's great to chop up an album like The Wall or Operation: Mindcrime into singles, it loses the feel to only have those few songs and none of the other tracks.


Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.
 
2013-09-10 03:52:56 AM  
I'm happy with my parents' musical tastes.  Dad enjoyed classical music, rock, and jazz; mom was into folk and jazz.  Dad was a good enough classical pianist to be a professional, and mom was a good amateur singer.

Now in my 20s I like some music that they hate (punk, rap, hip hop), but we share a common appreciation for the aforementioned genres.  Most of all I'm glad that they gave me a musical upbringing - piano lessons, concerts, something always playing in the house, the confidence to improvise.
 
2013-09-10 03:56:34 AM  
My father was a little bit gospel (with some classical); my mother was entirely gospel.

The Carpenters were considered "Satanic". It was just short of a brawl being able to pay with my own money to see Air Supply at the local county fair (the one and only year we camped there [for church reasons]) when I was 12ish.

Didn't really hear what they call non-soft-rock until I was 14 (if I remember correctly, it was Sex (I'm A Virgin...) by Berlin).
Didn't see MTV for the first time until 15.
Homeschooled until I was kicked out and, de facto, disowned at 14 (looooong story with a JUST-non-crushingly-depressing ending) (I'm still standing!)
Yes, my first concert was Air Supply. (the other two options were Hank Williams, Jr. [certain of that one] and, I think, Tommy Tutone (of 867-5309/Jenny fame).
There's very little gospel music that doesn't make me mentally take the fetal position when I hear it today.
 
2013-09-10 03:57:59 AM  

Igor Jakovsky: Growing up on trips I would get what was played on the oldies station (50s-60s) pop/rock. At home a majority of the albums were what we now think of as classic rock and southern rock from the 60s and 70s. I could have done worse. My Dad also took me to see some concerts that were great like Crosby Stills and Nash, Grateful Dead, Skynyrd sans Ronnie of course.

One song ill always stop and listen to if I hear it is Crimson and Clover by Tommy James and the Shondells. I have no idea why I am so fond of that song in particular.


That's a great song. Ever heard the full album version? It's almost 6 minutes and a lot trippier.

Begoggle: My parents' music from the 50's was good.
Early 60's saw rock degrade into gimmicks and cheese.
I am not fond of the late 60's hippie stuff but I can acknowledge there was talent.
The early 70's was garbage.
Late 70's you still had some junk in the mainstream but good bands and singers were rising up in all genres.
Good music peaked around 1984 - all forms of rock, rap, punk, pop, etc. even the bad stuff was good.

Around 1990, pop music was shiat but the alternative genres were good and in the early 90s there was still lots of good stuff to be found.
Around the mid-90's music all around went downhill and has been going downhill since and never recovered.


9/10 - This is how trolling is done.

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.


I just hate it. They like most of my stuff though, so...
 
2013-09-10 04:01:17 AM  
...take the fetal position on those extremely rare occasions when I allow myself to be exposed to it today.

altered.
 
2013-09-10 04:02:12 AM  

ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.


I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).
 
2013-09-10 04:03:25 AM  

Abacus9: Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.


upload.wikimedia.org

If you say so.
 
2013-09-10 04:11:08 AM  

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Abacus9: Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x399]

If you say so.


What's your point?
 
2013-09-10 04:22:25 AM  

Abacus9: Duck_of_Doom: TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

Didn't the music industry start out issuing singles?  It seems that we're going back to where we started - one track to catch interest.  It has some positive aspects: no more filler tracks.  Buy only what you want, not $10-15 for one or two good songs and never listen to the whole album.

On the other hand, some albums had gems that weren't played on air.  Occasionally, the singles were the weaker songs.  The continuous play of a concept album will be gone also. While it's great to chop up an album like The Wall or Operation: Mindcrime into singles, it loses the feel to only have those few songs and none of the other tracks.

Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.



Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.
 
2013-09-10 04:25:06 AM  

Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).


Rock on man.
 
2013-09-10 04:29:43 AM  

stoli n coke: Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.


Led Zeppelin refused to record singles. The record company could do what they wanted. That's why much of their stuff is good, they refused to package it into a poppy 3 minute crapbasket. Albums were a bigger deal in those days than before. I grew up in the early 90's, and it was the same. If Soundgarden had a new song on the radio, I don't know a single person that went out and bought the single.
 
2013-09-10 04:30:21 AM  

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).

Rock on man.


Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.
 
2013-09-10 04:34:33 AM  

Abacus9: Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.



How ya doin'? Pleased (?) to make your virtual acquaintance.

over 40, not yet 50.

/although, honestly, I prefer Stax.
 
2013-09-10 04:38:30 AM  

Abacus9: stoli n coke: Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.

Led Zeppelin refused to record singles. The record company could do what they wanted. That's why much of their stuff is good, they refused to package it into a poppy 3 minute crapbasket. Albums were a bigger deal in those days than before. I grew up in the early 90's, and it was the same. If Soundgarden had a new song on the radio, I don't know a single person that went out and bought the single.



And Stairway To Heaven became a breakout single mainly because it was a song long enough to allow DJs to take a smoke break.

Still, in the 50s and 60s, many artists would put out singles between albums just to keep interest going. Since audiences were fickle, it was a safer bet than waiting 2 years for an album to get finished.

Plus, you have to remember, those were the jukebox days. Bands wanted to keep their stuff playing at bars, clubs, restaurants, etc, so putting out a single or two every couple of months while working on the album was just good business.

It didn't really start getting album centric until around the Abbey Road days.
 
2013-09-10 04:46:31 AM  

Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).

Rock on man.

Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.


What's the first Motown song you think of?
 
2013-09-10 04:48:03 AM  
Mom gave us classical music, John Philips Sousa and honky tonk piano.  She also gave us Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich and Glen Miller.  I love them still.  My kids have had my teenaged musical taste inflicted on them their entire lives.  Yet, they still sing along to the classics from the sixties and seventies.  It's okay, we're only bleeding.
 
2013-09-10 04:51:07 AM  
Was that a typo in the headline, or does this only apply to one parent? Both of mine like the same stuff.
 
2013-09-10 04:54:53 AM  

stoli n coke: Abacus9: stoli n coke: Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.

Led Zeppelin refused to record singles. The record company could do what they wanted. That's why much of their stuff is good, they refused to package it into a poppy 3 minute crapbasket. Albums were a bigger deal in those days than before. I grew up in the early 90's, and it was the same. If Soundgarden had a new song on the radio, I don't know a single person that went out and bought the single.


And Stairway To Heaven became a breakout single mainly because it was a song long enough to allow DJs to take a smoke break. -

Yes, but it wasn't recorded to be a single.

Still, in the 50s and 60s, many artists would put out singles between albums just to keep interest going. Since audiences were fickle, it was a safer bet than waiting 2 years for an album to get finished. - This is true, and occasionally still happens, but is still promotional more than anything. They don't make a ton of money.

Plus, you have to remember, those were the jukebox days. Bands wanted to keep their stuff playing at bars, clubs, restaurants, etc, so putting out a single or two every couple of months while working on the album was just good business.

It didn't really start getting album centric until around the Abbey Road days. -
Yeah, and in those early days it wasn't really an album so much as a collection of songs recorded around the same time. In the really old days you would fit a symphony onto one record, but popular music had much shorter songs recorded onto the same format. When real albums started coming out, the singles were basically just to promote them and to promote the tour (where the real money was). It's sad to see things turning back to single-centric music, as a good album was a true art.
 
2013-09-10 04:56:50 AM  

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).

Rock on man.

Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.

What's the first Motown song you think of?


My Girl, I guess.
 
2013-09-10 05:00:08 AM  
I grew up with my parents listening to the likes of Fleetwood Mac, Alabama, The Statler Brothers, The Oak Ridge Boys, Eddie Rabbit, Simon and Garfunkel, Elton John, Bob Seger, and Jim Croce.  I still, to this day, get choked up listening to Croce's "Operator"......
 
2013-09-10 05:00:41 AM  
I was born then albums were popular, am I not clever?
 
2013-09-10 05:01:56 AM  
My dad taught me the love of swing and Big Band. He used to put a speaker under my pillow when I was a tot.

I learned to love the Blues on my own.
 
2013-09-10 05:40:40 AM  

12349876: zez: My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior.

Maybe you can compromise with this.  Dubstep djent progressive metal from the keyboardist in Textures.  Free on Bandcamp.
http://theulex.bandcamp.com/


Awesome stuff, thanks for the link
 
2013-09-10 06:20:35 AM  
If you mean the Jazz and Swing they listened to as younger people, yes.  If you mean the elevator music they listen to as senior citizens, then no.
 
2013-09-10 06:31:35 AM  
Hang down your head Tom Dooley, hang down your head and cry...

Fighting soldiers from the sky, fearless men....

It was an itsy, bitsy, teeny, weenie, yellow polka dot bikini
 
2013-09-10 06:39:41 AM  
My mom loved Big Band/Swing.  My dad loved 30s-40s standards, and Don McLean.

I love all kinds of music, so yeah, I love their stuff too.
 
2013-09-10 06:41:44 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: My step-father was into things like Nelson Eddie and Jeanette McDonald

/wasn't real fond of it
//but I can name Indian Love Call in two notes


When I'm calling you-ooo-ooo-ooo...
 
2013-09-10 06:43:48 AM  
My children are doomed.  Dad is playing 70-80's heavy metal on constant rotation in his car, and I swing from Neil Diamond to Hank Jr. and Merle Haggard, with some Alice Cooper thrown in, in mine.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA!
 
2013-09-10 06:48:05 AM  

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: TuteTibiImperes: The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.

[d2heru13qkbk4q.cloudfront.net image 685x630]

/you really want the whole album?


The recording of this was bankrolled by the sister of the founder of Stax Records, after her share of the company was bought out. Dees was a DJ in Memphis..RSO distributed it. Estelle Axton was originally half owner of Stax, and ran the record shop attached to the studio and knew what would be popular with frightening regularity.
 
2013-09-10 06:50:46 AM  
This record scarred me for life.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-10 06:51:41 AM  

LiteWerk: Hang down your head Tom Dooley, hang down your head and cry...

Fighting soldiers from the sky, fearless men....

It was an itsy, bitsy, teeny, weenie, yellow polka dot bikini


In 1814 we took a little trip...
 
2013-09-10 06:56:20 AM  

Sinbox: Abacus9: Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.


How ya doin'? Pleased (?) to make your virtual acquaintance.

over 40, not yet 50.

/although, honestly, I prefer Stax.


45 currently, I've loved Motown for years. But I'm also a wannabe bass player, so those James Jamerson and Bill Babbett basslines (and Carol Kaye from the later LA sessions) are the shiat.
 
2013-09-10 06:56:21 AM  
My parents listened to the classical music station on the radio. It's the background sound of my childhood, masking the silence that was my parents unwillingness/inability to communicate with each other. To this day, hearing classical music fills me with low-level anxiety and a general feeling of despair.
 
2013-09-10 06:57:02 AM  
My dad went from Beatles to ZZ Top. Its my mom's taste in music that sucked.
 
2013-09-10 07:04:03 AM  
Wait. Johnny Cash is only mentioned twice on this page? It's the only thing my grandfather, father, and I really agreed about. Well that and Hank Williams. Senior. Junior tries too hard.
 
2013-09-10 07:19:00 AM  
I'm a metalhead, which means that my kids will secretly love Pantera, Machine Head, Judas Priest, and Motorhead.

But when they're teenagers the little shiatheads will probably become hip-hop or dubstep fans just to annoy me.
 
2013-09-10 07:47:47 AM  

mr lawson: SevenizGud: I secretly love gospel? Somehow I doubt it.

this
/ seriously: "Are you washed in the BLOOD of the lamb"
What kind of  farking psycho thought THAT up AND to make it a song?
"Hey kids, go grab that lamb over there and we'll slit it's throat! Then we can all take a sponge bath with it's blood!" Fun for all!
//yes, it get it is an allegory. Still a farked up one.


Some of the... uh... urban gospel is really catchy and well produced. Super musicians and great choirs. It's great sounding music. If you have a system that can reproduce bass well, this will do it.
 
2013-09-10 07:56:56 AM  

gweilo8888: Philip Glass, beeyotches.

/that is all


I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.
 
2013-09-10 07:58:56 AM  
I'm against it.

Somewhere along the line, somebody got the idea that music was a disposable commodity with an expiration date. And a preferred origin, for that matter. That's pure marketing nonsense, and all of the arguments that stem from it are pretty much uninformed, or disinformed.

If you can develop an immunity to the small instrumental and stylistic differences, any age or origin of music is valid and fair for consideration. Al Jolson and Cab Calloway are bumptious and joyful, Fats Waller is sly and puckish, and George Formby and Eddie Cantor are pretty hysterical, in a Voh-de-oh-doh kind of way. Middle Eastern Oud music is half-brother to Indian Sitar and Sarangi ragas, and Irish Trad is a direct cousin to American folk.

In short, there's a lot of good stuff out there everywhere and everywhen, if you're open to the experience.

The trick is getting exposure to it. Exposure is what creates the immunity to marketing and vox populi claims of obsolescence, and it's hard to come by. Instead of accepting that children are programmed to enjoy certain old music because somebody gave them a cookie while they were listening to "Freddy and the Dreamers," perhaps it is as simple as they were exposed to music they found enjoyable before they were programmed by society to Not enjoy "that old stuff."

There are plenty of examples of people on this board who rejected their parent's taste in music, which shoots holes in the Pavlovian theory put forth in the article. The lazy insistence that cause-and-effect rules every aspect of human existence strips people of credit for their individual choices, at any age.
 
2013-09-10 08:00:19 AM  

RogermcAllen: My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.


snuff3r: My poor kids.. they get an ecclectic mix of 70-80s music via their mother and really, really heavy shiat via me.

Though my kids tell me they hate my music I have to admit pride when I catch my 2yo daughter "dancing" to Slayer or Gojira or whatever i'm listening to.

How does one dance to Gojira?  Are you sure that your music doesn't actually send the child into seizures?


http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/Cat's-in-the-Cradle-lyrics-Harr y-Chapin/BA220879AAA70B8A48256CAA002DFE9B
 
2013-09-10 08:01:45 AM  
my dad is weird.  he doesn't really listen to music.  he doesn't own any music of his own and he's never once expressed liking a particular band or singer.  he just turns on classic rock radio stations and refers to it as "background noise."  he doesn't actually listen to it or pay any attention to it.  he's the only person i think i've ever known who really has no interest in music.

my mom on the other hand loves music but doesn't seem to have any particular favorites.  when i was a kid in the 80s, she listened to bon jovi and def leppard just like me, and in the 90s listened to pop stuff like collective soul and hootie and the blowfish.  she claims her favorite band is the bee gees, but in my entire life i've never heard her actually listen to the bee gees.  she also listens to oldies stations and country music, she likes almost everything.
 
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