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(Salon)   Let's face it, deep down we all secretly love our parent's horrible taste in music   (salon.com) divider line 269
    More: Interesting, music release, Poker Face, background music, Black Eyed Peas  
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6221 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2013 at 12:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



269 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-10 12:47:37 AM  

stoli n coke: What's with all the Freddie Fender hate? His stuff is better than most of the AM Gold singers.


damn it, I love freddie fender and my rancho grande

/thanks, dad!
 
2013-09-10 12:47:48 AM  
Dad's music? Yeah.

Mom's? Hell no.
 
2013-09-10 12:48:40 AM  
Lucky me!  I have two parents with horrible taste in music.
 
2013-09-10 12:49:42 AM  
Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.
 
2013-09-10 12:50:04 AM  
My dad listened to 50s-60s oldies, lots of motown and the Beatles plus a bit of country. My mom was all about classic rock, Talking Heads, Tom Petty and I distinctly remember her wearing a Live Throwing Copper t-shirt.

/yeah, they divorced, why did you ask
 
2013-09-10 12:50:52 AM  
All things considered, the music at home could have been a lot worse than this:

upload.wikimedia.org

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-10 12:52:37 AM  
My parents were huge country fans and I couldn't stand it. Still can't. I started listening to Beatles and Monkees when I was young but then got bit by the Hendrix, Who, Zeppelin, Santana, Tull bug and from then on was a fan of rocking out with a side order of prog. My kids all developed very different tastes (none of them like country or pop either thankfully) but they still enjoy what my wife and I listen to as well as their own stuff.

/my daughter sent me a video the other day of her 18 month daughter dancing to YYZ
//proud grandpa
 
2013-09-10 12:52:38 AM  

Ringshadow: My mom has excellent taste in music. She got me into classic rock, into metal, into blues and swing. My dad's tastes? More questionable. Mostly he's into pop that I can barely stand but the zydeco's not bad.

/now my classmates? Terrible taste in music
//most hellish experience of my life was an Nsync concert


Tell me the ensuing beejay was worth it.  It better have been awesome to go through that shiat.

oceanup.com

southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com
 
2013-09-10 12:53:31 AM  
I'm finding the best music in my life right now nearing 30 with the internet to find bands that have largely never been on the radio or performed anywhere near me, but I do find it to be a largely a combination of everything that I was wanting but not quite getting from the music I had growing up but I've still got a sweet spot for most of it.

Mom - 50s and 60s Oldies, Trans Siberian and Mannheim Steamroller
Dad - 70s hard rock and early metal
School - orchestra and jazz
Teenage Obsession - Queen
Now Translation - Progressive Metal
 
2013-09-10 12:54:31 AM  
Growing up I hated it when my mom would play her Neil Diamond records.  Now, I kind of like the guy's music.
 
2013-09-10 12:56:31 AM  
My parents gave me a deep love of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Santana, and Bonnie Raitt. They like bluesy rock music. Nothing wrong with that.
 
2013-09-10 12:57:05 AM  
My Dad's record/cd collection got me into Peter Gabriel, Phil Collins, Dire Straits, Chris DeBurgh, classical music

My Uncle got me into Yes, Genesis, ELP, Sex Pistols, King Crimson, Talking Heads, Brian Eno, Robert Fripp, Tangerine Dream, Joy Division
 
2013-09-10 12:58:58 AM  

HemlockStones: I got my son interested in Tom Waits.
All downhill from here...


I actually just started getting into Tom Waits a few years ago, only to find that my dad was a huge fan and I never knew it. I started getting into Waits shortly after realizing he was behind a song in Fight Club, and the intro to Muse's Hullabaloo live concert DVD (they used "What's He Building" as an intro, which I loved. They last used it for their Origin of Symmetry 10th anniversary show).

It's kind of sad to think I'll probably never get to see him in concert
 
2013-09-10 12:59:25 AM  

RogermcAllen: My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.



Groan.
But...well-played, farker.
 
2013-09-10 12:59:28 AM  
For some music this is spot on.  We always listened to Billy Joel, and my parents liked Jethro Tull so much, they named me Ian.

My dad initially hooked me on Dire Straits in the early 80's.

Some other music (Meatloaf, Traffic, Neil Diamond), not so much.

My parents were the typical late-60's/early-70's Boomers.
 
2013-09-10 01:00:11 AM  
I still have and listen to my parents' Louis Prima & Charlie Parker LPs. I was one of those kids who spent all his allowance money on 45s at the local Sears and followed the radio charts. Years later when my folks finally gave up the big stereo for a downsized CD console [and joined the Columbia House CD club, hah! Even though I worked in a record store!] they let me have the old vinyl which I cherry-picked and sold/donated the rest. Also got some Janis Joplin, Simon & Garfunkel, even some decent cheese like Jackie Gleason. They were hipper than I gave them credit for.
Thanks Mom & Dad!

/the piano lessons eventually turned me into a James Booker & Professor Longhair fanatic, extra-infinity thanks for that
//still got most of my Sears 45s, too
 
2013-09-10 01:03:01 AM  
RogermcAllen: My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.

That was pretty good.  I almost didn't catch it at first.
 
2013-09-10 01:04:15 AM  
My mother had great taste in music. I like Neil Diamond, The Carpenters, etc.
 
2013-09-10 01:04:51 AM  
I won't lie I used to blast her Tina Turner shiat
 
2013-09-10 01:05:13 AM  
Well, my dad hated The Beach Boys during and after their best days and I thought they were great thirty years after their prime, so he may have been on to something.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:15 AM  

Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


So tell us how you really feel.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:20 AM  
If I'd had kids they'd probably have become musical omnivores since I listen to every musical genre except hip hop. Got Beethoven's Violin Concerto In D on right now. Earlier I was listening to Taiko drumming, ragtime piano, and songs from WWI.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:43 AM  
True for me.  My parents, incidentally, listened to what was even then considered oldies.  So even though I grew up in the 80s/early 90s, my "formative" music was 60s/70s pop, which is generally good stuff, all except for the goddamn Beegees.

/Jeremiah was a bullfrog
 
2013-09-10 01:06:00 AM  
My father really, really loved Gregorian Chanting. So, no.

/dnrtfa
 
2013-09-10 01:06:46 AM  

Smeggy Smurf: My folks like country music.  I like country music.  My kids like country music.

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 400x400]


What country?
 
2013-09-10 01:07:04 AM  
I can agree with the article.  Listened to Connie Francis, Dion, Frankie Avalon, Shirelles, Barry Manilow, Air Supply, a lot of Oldies & easy listening, and old Italian music growing up.  I can still listen to some of it without groaning - for instance, I can tolerate only 5 songs by Manilow.  Others, like John Denver and Louis Prima, I grew to enjoy on their own merit.  Weird thing, when my mom was recently in the hospital, I gravitated towards that older music while driving. I could have used Amon Amarth emotionally, but opted for Helen Reddy.

I pity any kid I'd ever have. Since I like a little of everything, they will not have a genre of their own to get me to hate.

/back in my day, we listened to Debbie Gibson and NKOTB, and we liked it
//no, we didn't, we said we did to be accepted by some idiot friends, and then put on Queensryche when they left
 
2013-09-10 01:07:57 AM  
My father was a semi-pro musician.  He played trumpet with Tommy Dorsey, Glen Miller, Benny Goodman, and Gene Krupa.  I do love some of that music, just as I love  some of the music from my own childhood in the 1960s-1980s. But if I'm being honest with myself, there was a lot more crap released than great music, and that's true of every era.

What gets preserved and passed along to the next generation are the few "gems" that are released.  The majority of songs, even the ones that are hits, are soon forgotten.  In 2033, nobody is going to be singing "Friday" or "Gangnam Style" or whatever a Justin Beiber is, because those are forgettable.

If you grew up in the 1960s, you remember The Beatles, The Stones, The Beach Boys, and The Doors.  You have probably forgotten Little Joey and the Flips, Unit 4+2, and Whistling Jack Smith.

If you grew up in the 1970s, you remember Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and maybe T-Rex, The Ramones, The Clash, and the Sex Pistols.  You've forgotten Paul Humphrey and the Cool Aid Chemists, Jud Strunk, and the Wilton Place Street Band.

You remember The Police and REM from the 1980s, but you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats.  You remember Nirvana and Sound Garden from the 1990s, but you've forgotten N2Deep and Masta Ace Incorporated.

The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present.  It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.

Also, while we're on the subject, onions on my belt, get off my lawn, kids today with their hippin' and hoppin, and bippin' and boppin.  Get me a jell-o pudding pop, uphill both ways in the snow and furthermore comma.
 
2013-09-10 01:10:34 AM  
Electric Lights Orchestra =/
 
2013-09-10 01:11:00 AM  
My dad likes George Strait, Petula Clark, and the Texas Aggie Band.  I don't really care for those things, except for the Aggie band, but only when the team is playing.
 
2013-09-10 01:11:04 AM  

Solty Dog: Dubstep is alright, though.


Does that crap even qualify as music?
 
2013-09-10 01:11:55 AM  

TwowheelinTim: Solty Dog: Dubstep is alright, though.

Does that crap even qualify as music?


It does if you're a Transformer.
 
2013-09-10 01:12:55 AM  
My dad knows more about classical music -- and musicians -- than I'll ever know, plus he still has the Benny Goodman 78s that he purchased on leave during WWII.  And he designed and built his own hi-fi system out of war-surplus hardware in the late 40s, to play the then-new LP records.  I can only aspire to those levels of coolness.
 
2013-09-10 01:13:34 AM  

TwowheelinTim: Solty Dog: Dubstep is alright, though.

Does that crap even qualify as music?


Dubstep is to music what Twinkies are to food: a liw-quality guilty pleasure every once in a while, but very easy to get sick of.
 
2013-09-10 01:15:40 AM  

FloydA: My father was a semi-pro musician.  He played trumpet with Tommy Dorsey, Glen Miller, Benny Goodman, and Gene Krupa.  I do love some of that music, just as I love  some of the music from my own childhood in the 1960s-1980s. But if I'm being honest with myself, there was a lot more crap released than great music, and that's true of every era.

What gets preserved and passed along to the next generation are the few "gems" that are released.  The majority of songs, even the ones that are hits, are soon forgotten.  In 2033, nobody is going to be singing "Friday" or "Gangnam Style" or whatever a Justin Beiber is, because those are forgettable.

If you grew up in the 1960s, you remember The Beatles, The Stones, The Beach Boys, and The Doors.  You have probably forgotten Little Joey and the Flips, Unit 4+2, and Whistling Jack Smith.

If you grew up in the 1970s, you remember Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and maybe T-Rex, The Ramones, The Clash, and the Sex Pistols.  You've forgotten Paul Humphrey and the Cool Aid Chemists, Jud Strunk, and the Wilton Place Street Band.

You remember The Police and REM from the 1980s, but you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats.  You remember Nirvana and Sound Garden from the 1990s, but you've forgotten N2Deep and Masta Ace Incorporated.

The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present.  It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.

Also, while we're on the subject, onions on my belt, get off my lawn, kids today with their hippin' and hoppin, and bippin' and boppin.  Get me a jell-o pudding pop, uphill both ways in the snow and furthermore comma.


Well stated.
 
2013-09-10 01:16:43 AM  
Actually, I quite like Crystal Gayle, Joan Baez, Tom Jones, Neil Diamond, and Kenny Rogers. They may be "my parents' music", but they are all unabashedly in my collection.
 
2013-09-10 01:17:02 AM  
I remember my parents playing Alabama, Bob Seger, The Righteous Brothers, Kenny Rogers, Charlie Daniels Band, etc, around the house when I was growing up.  Some of it I do still enjoy.  I'm not a huge fan of The Righteous Brothers, but I enjoy the country oldies and older souther rock still.
 
2013-09-10 01:20:30 AM  
My dad's albums were Bob Newhart, Bill Cosby, and Jonathan Winters. Funny stuff still.
 
zez
2013-09-10 01:21:14 AM  
My mom had a fantastic record collection, she was a member of columbia house and would always forget to send the card in so they would send whatever the record of the month was, but even before that she had great taste in music (I was born in 1967). My dad just listened to sports and AM talk radio. The few songs I remember him actively liking were Behind Closed Doors by Charlie Rich and Bob Segar's Old time rock n roll.

Both me and my younger brother picked up on my mom's music cues, but our much younger brother who was born after our parents' music buying days were over is into pop country (shudder).

My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior. The 5 year old likes to hear "rock music with drums and GUITAR!" It's much easier to keep the 5 year old happy when I'm around.
 
2013-09-10 01:24:23 AM  
My mom saw The Doors, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and so on live in Los Angeles in the 60s. Her music history is enviable.
 
2013-09-10 01:25:04 AM  
Burt Bacharach and Herb Alpert.  They're in my blood and I want them gone.
 
2013-09-10 01:26:58 AM  

FloydA: The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present. It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.


Well put and true.

These days, I listen largely to what might be classified as folk rock. The modern variety, mostly.

I could compile a triple album of great songs that were made in just the last five years, so there's a lot of good material out there.

These are the good old days...  or some such.
 
2013-09-10 01:27:52 AM  

zez: My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior.


Maybe you can compromise with this.  Dubstep djent progressive metal from the keyboardist in Textures.  Free on Bandcamp.
http://theulex.bandcamp.com/
 
2013-09-10 01:29:24 AM  
My mom had the most unbelievable shiate in her collection, but never listened to ANY of it, so I had to discover all of it...the Who, Moody Bues, Traffic, Led Zep, The Dead, Pink Floyd, Beatles and the Stones.

She also had a lot of head scratchers of course...

What did she listen to? Utter garbage like Poco and jimmy buffet

I literally have no idea what happened in her album collection, did Martians come and plant the good stuff there? Did she suffer head trauma somewhere and lose all of her coolness? No idea.
 
2013-09-10 01:34:02 AM  
Being an old Farker, I got a lot of the 50s-60s stuff, Elvis and the Beatles, But I also grew up in a household that played a lot of Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr, and Al Martino.

When my folks died, I inherited their old albums, and still pull them out once in a while to give them a listen.
 
zez
2013-09-10 01:34:23 AM  

12349876: zez: My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior.

Maybe you can compromise with this.  Dubstep djent progressive metal from the keyboardist in Textures.  Free on Bandcamp.
http://theulex.bandcamp.com/


Thanks! I think my 9 year old might like this, the 5 year old likes more AC/DC type rock.
 
2013-09-10 01:36:06 AM  
Enya?  ABBA?

How about NO?
 
2013-09-10 01:36:41 AM  

FloydA: you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats


Are you shiatting me?  Have you seen the literal video for Safety Dance?  Goddamn funniest thing ever.

http://www.collegehumor.com/video/5812266/literal-safety-dance
 
2013-09-10 01:36:49 AM  

zez: the 5 year old likes more AC/DC type rock.



Now that's a cool kid.
 
2013-09-10 01:39:03 AM  
The thing that most confuses me about my parents is how the music they listen to is frozen in stone. Dad listens to one radio station (Rock 102) that near as I can tell has played the exact same 100 or so songs every single day since around 1985 or so. I'm pretty sure the poor man has heard shiat like Fly Like An Eagle and Life in the Fast Lane literally ten thousand times.

I get that you like what was around when you were young, but holy shiat that's like 15-20 years of music. You deserve more than 100 songs.
 
2013-09-10 01:39:28 AM  
I do start with my dad's tastes in music. New wave, late 70's/early 80's punk. The logical continuation from there is my current tastes. Metal, Hard Rock, and the same new wave and some modern pop punk (Blink-182)
 
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