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(Salon)   Let's face it, deep down we all secretly love our parent's horrible taste in music   (salon.com) divider line 269
    More: Interesting, music release, Poker Face, background music, Black Eyed Peas  
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6113 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Sep 2013 at 12:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



269 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-09 11:33:54 PM
Deep down we are all imprinted with the music we hear from age 10 to age 17.
 
2013-09-09 11:39:05 PM
this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?
 
2013-09-09 11:41:44 PM
I grew up listening to Delta blues and bebop jazz.  And while those aren't my usual taste in music today (metal), I still love 'em.  Gave me a basis for musical appreciation, it did.

/thanks Dad
 
2013-09-09 11:43:14 PM

Mztlplx: I grew up listening to Delta blues and bebop jazz.  And while those aren't my usual taste in music today (metal), I still love 'em.  Gave me a basis for musical appreciation, it did.

/thanks Dad


And my daughter (now 16) picked up a taste for the Ramones and Stevie Ray Vaughan from me.

/the circle of life......
 
2013-09-09 11:43:53 PM
Secretly? No. When we were young, my brothers and I used to get a kick out of playing our dad's old big band and mambo 78s, and Mom's 45s from the 1950s (including Rock Around The Clock).
 
2013-09-09 11:45:34 PM
My poor kids.. they get an ecclectic mix of 70-80s music via their mother and really, really heavy shiat via me.

Though my kids tell me they hate my music I have to admit pride when I catch my 2yo daughter "dancing" to Slayer or Gojira or whatever i'm listening to.
 
2013-09-10 12:00:52 AM
My step-father was into things like Nelson Eddie and Jeanette McDonald

/wasn't real fond of it
//but I can name Indian Love Call in two notes
 
2013-09-10 12:25:18 AM
My folks like country music.  I like country music.  My kids like country music.

fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net
 
2013-09-10 12:25:38 AM
my dad liked "Big Girls Dont Cry" and "Brand New Key".

my mom liked the Beatles and Creedence. My mom had excellent taste in music!
 
2013-09-10 12:26:20 AM
Philip Glass, beeyotches.

/that is all
 
2013-09-10 12:26:30 AM
I secretly love gospel? Somehow I doubt it.
 
2013-09-10 12:26:36 AM
What does the fox say?
 
2013-09-10 12:26:42 AM
I was raised in a moderately strict Lutheran household and music wasn't my parents thing. The only time I'd hear music was a mixture of Glenn Campbell and church hymns. I'm glad I found Slayer and Metallica in 1985.
 
2013-09-10 12:27:05 AM
I hope my kid doesn't end up liking Oi. I try not to listen around him.
 
2013-09-10 12:28:27 AM

Kuta: What does the fox say?


'Totally ripping off LMFAO -o-o-o'
 
2013-09-10 12:28:28 AM

Kuta: What does the fox say?


EOO EWOO CHK CHK CHK
 
2013-09-10 12:28:46 AM
I love my horrible taste in music. Lisa Lisa, the Cover Girls, T'Pau, Cathy Denis.
 
2013-09-10 12:29:04 AM
The only music that was allowed in our house was Elvis and country like Freddie Fender and Jeanie Pruett. I don't prefer it, but I tolerate it just the same as most music. The only stuff I can't stand is Polka.
 
2013-09-10 12:29:13 AM

KinetiKiteniK: I was raised in a moderately strict Lutheran household and music wasn't my parents thing. The only time I'd hear music was a mixture of Glenn Campbell and church hymns. I'm glad I found Slayer and Metallica in 1985.


Glenn Campbell was an amazing guitarist and vocalist, and was more rock n roll cocaine fueled asshole than metallica or slayer.
 
2013-09-10 12:31:13 AM
I grew up in the 90s and listen to Zeppelin, Beach Boys, old blues and jazz, plus some random newer stuff. My old man thinks my taste in music is horribly out of date compared to his love for the Cranberries, Tori Amos, etc.
 
2013-09-10 12:31:24 AM
Parents' Record Collection Deemed Hilarious

Music and pop-culture experts agree that the Schnell record collection is one of the most hilarious in the country today.

"At turns atrocious, tasteless, tepid, and self-parodying, the Schnell discography is a perfect encapsulation of the listening tastes of the American bourgeoisie in the mid- to late 20th century, as well as a knee-slappingly hilarious compendium of misguided trends in popular music," said Lydia Dreifort, director of the Alan Lomax Center For American Ethnomusicology in Oxford, MS. "Can you believe they actually own Neil Diamond's Jonathan Livingston Seagull?"

"I greatly look forward to having the chance to examine it firsthand," Dreifort said of the collection, which not only features Hooked On Classics, but Hooked On Swing and Hooked On Broadway. "The exquisite squareness of the music is truly something to behold."
 
2013-09-10 12:32:02 AM

Cewley: then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


I'm sorry, are you claiming that running scales between :teeth clench: every. god. damned note. isn't a talent?  Son, you are whiter than mayo on Wonder Bread.

/I tot... tota.. mmmmm nynanan, mmmmynana.. totalyyyy huh heuyuyuyuyuyuyu agree.
//I said I uuuuuha agREEuh with you-a. I. I saw uh I uh, I totally agree with you-wuwuwuwuwuwuw.
 
2013-09-10 12:32:30 AM
I hardly think so. My Mom use to listen to Neil Diamond, which isn't that bad I guess, but she also use to listen to John Michael Talbot. My parents are much older than I am, my Dad being 40 when I was born, so the music he likes is very different. His taste is quite odd too, the theme from the movie Flashdance being one of his favorites, yeah, I know, WTF right?
 
2013-09-10 12:32:51 AM
Freddy Fender? Boots Randolf? Polkas? Nah. I like my horrible music much better.
 
2013-09-10 12:33:29 AM

Solty Dog: The only music that was allowed in our house was Elvis and country like Freddie Fender and Jeanie Pruett. I don't prefer it, but I tolerate it just the same as most music. The only stuff I can't stand is Polka.


oompa oompa oompa oompa

It's not that different than

oontz oontz oontz oontz
 
2013-09-10 12:34:17 AM
My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.


snuff3r: My poor kids.. they get an ecclectic mix of 70-80s music via their mother and really, really heavy shiat via me.

Though my kids tell me they hate my music I have to admit pride when I catch my 2yo daughter "dancing" to Slayer or Gojira or whatever i'm listening to.


How does one dance to Gojira?  Are you sure that your music doesn't actually send the child into seizures?
 
2013-09-10 12:34:34 AM
They won an LP at a curling bonspiel and it was a Christian album. I agree about some of his music but I liked the heavier stuff.
 
2013-09-10 12:34:37 AM
My dad likes Hendrix, The Who, Genesis, Peter Gabriel, Joe Satriani, Melissa Ethridge, old school Eric Clapton (but will talk at length about how he hates Clapton's 90s-on run, especially that collaboration with Babyface and the slow version of Layla), and Tool.

I have no issues with my dad's taste in music.

/He also listens to a lot of blues stuff, but I don't know as much about who he loves in that genre outside of Bonnie Raitt
 
2013-09-10 12:35:40 AM

Smeggy Smurf: oompa oompa oompa oompa

It's not that different than

oontz oontz oontz oontz


Our local station has the Polka Hour. It plays after Sesame Street. If I'm not careful, my son gets a dose now and again.

Dubstep is alright, though.
 
2013-09-10 12:35:42 AM

Kuta: What does the fox say?


And what the fark is the meaning of Stonehenge?
 
2013-09-10 12:36:13 AM

RogermcAllen: snuff3r: My poor kids.. they get an ecclectic mix of 70-80s music via their mother and really, really heavy shiat via me.Though my kids tell me they hate my music I have to admit pride when I catch my 2yo daughter "dancing" to Slayer or Gojira or whatever i'm listening to


My daughter wants me to do the Slayer christmas lights thing. Although I think I'd go with Rammstein,.
 
2013-09-10 12:36:25 AM

Solty Dog: The only music that was allowed in our house was Elvis and country like Freddie Fender and Jeanie Pruett. I don't prefer it, but I tolerate it just the same as most music. The only stuff I can't stand is Polka.


Granny ran a diner with a decent selection of twangy deep country hits and rocking New Orleans cuts, but grand dad's bass boat had exactly three 8 tracks: Merle Haggard, Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn.  Thank God he thought playing the music scared away the fish; leaving an 8-track in the player just means it loops forever.
 
2013-09-10 12:36:55 AM
It's basically like David Chappelle said, the electric guitar is the instrument that speaks to the soul of the white person.
 
2013-09-10 12:38:21 AM
I have to admit, if a Billy Joel song comes on the radio, I am compelled to listen. That was my mom's doing. At some point she figured out that all us boys shut up when she played her Billy Joel cassette on road trips.
 
2013-09-10 12:38:46 AM
my father introduced me to sabbath, floyd, led zep, the band, etc.  can't complain
 
2013-09-10 12:39:38 AM
Simon and Garfunkle. Led Zeppelin. The Doors. Jethro Tull. Pink Floyd. Ray Charles.
 
2013-09-10 12:40:41 AM

MrEricSir: It's basically like David Chappelle said, the electric guitar is the instrument that speaks to the soul of the white person.


He's not wrong. These speak to whatever group of feelings people more spiritual might refer to as a "soul" in me:
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-09-10 12:41:11 AM
My dad was all Weavers and Joan Baez and Dylan and the Eagles...until he heard Culture Club when I was in high school and then he was all about the Karma Chameleon.

Daaaaaaaaaad!  You are so embarrassing!

"Groovy," he said.  Oh, my god.  I love him now--my teenage years, it was a little bumpy.
 
2013-09-10 12:42:29 AM
I do love Bruce Speingsteen, though I'm more of a Nebraska fan than Born in the USA.
 
2013-09-10 12:42:30 AM
I got my son interested in Tom Waits.
All downhill from here...
 
2013-09-10 12:42:50 AM

Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


You sound old. Why are you still alive?

I'm not sure I fully agree with TFA. I was raised on a steady diet of 50's and early 60's music, plus a fark ton of Billy Joel. To this day, I can appreciate it- in fact, one of the things I like doing when driving across the country, late at night, is to flip on the AM dial and tune in to some distant, crackly station playing that music. Tuning in those stations reminds me of the trips we made when I was a kid, and it was all we could get, while I stayed up as late as I possibly could to keep pops company while he drove through the night.

However....

Now he listens to country, and fark that. No way. No how. I'd rather drink subby's piss than listen to country.
 
2013-09-10 12:43:10 AM
Me: 50s-80s country, approx 70s-current hard rock/metal, and blues for the most part

Brother: Rockabilly, metal, punk, blues, and like 50s Hank Sr era country thats closer to blues than modern country

Dad: old country and like rock from prior to the hair band era(up to mid 80s)

Mom : pop/soft rock, especialy the 60s for some reason and like modern 90s and newer pop with a fiddle "country"

I guess dads resembles a slightly older version of mine moms doesnt resemble mine and is like the opposite of mine.
 
2013-09-10 12:44:34 AM
No arguments here. My dad introduced me to Cream, Hendrix, Zeppelin, The Beatles etc (I would return the favor later starting with Van Halen and ending with Soundgarden just before he died). My mom wasn't quite as hip but she did have a couple of early Jethro Tull and 70's era Elton John albums that I liked.

My first stepdad used to listen to a lot of Big Band and Swing music which didn't catch on with immediately but somewhere around my mid 20's I started to appreciate it.
 
2013-09-10 12:44:45 AM
I dunno about that.  My parents listened to a lot of Muzak in the car.  This is back in the late 70's and early 80's, when radio stations really did literally play Muzak - you know, all your favorite hits, without those troublesome lyrics.
 
2013-09-10 12:45:03 AM
I grew up with my folks blaring Led Zeppelin, The Doors, and Janis Joplin. I never thought their taste in music was horrible. Unless you mean horribly awesome.
 
2013-09-10 12:45:05 AM
Dad : Classic 60's to 70's rock - CHECK

Mom : Sinatra - CHECK

Grandpa (RIP) : Big Band/Swing - CHECK

Holds here.

/freeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeebird!
 
2013-09-10 12:45:11 AM
My mom has excellent taste in music. She got me into classic rock, into metal, into blues and swing. My dad's tastes? More questionable. Mostly he's into pop that I can barely stand but the zydeco's not bad.

/now my classmates? Terrible taste in music
//most hellish experience of my life was an Nsync concert
 
2013-09-10 12:45:44 AM
What's with all the Freddie Fender hate? His stuff is better than most of the AM Gold singers.
 
2013-09-10 12:46:47 AM
Um... no.

Dad picked the music, and his preference was for polkas and waltzes.  With accordions and concertinas. Which he also played.

I have a good sense of rhythm and pitch.  I disappointed my my dad greatly when I never picked up an instrument. What I never told him was that every time he hit a wrong note or lost the rhythm while he was practicing I just about cringed.

On the other hand, I do like music from what should have been my parents' era.  They were born in the 1920s, and I like Louis Armstrong, Glenn Miller, the Andrew Sisters, etc.  However, that music was not what got played in our house.
 
2013-09-10 12:47:31 AM

Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


All kinds of good stuff that isn't pop music is what's left.  Seriously, anything you're into is all there, vibrant as ever, and excellent.  You just need to put some effort into finding it.  Luckily, we've got a host of places that anyone can share their stuff.  Spend some time looking through youtube (there are entire albums on there from all kinds of artists), pandora, grooveshark, spotify, etc.
 
2013-09-10 12:47:37 AM

stoli n coke: What's with all the Freddie Fender hate? His stuff is better than most of the AM Gold singers.


damn it, I love freddie fender and my rancho grande

/thanks, dad!
 
2013-09-10 12:47:48 AM
Dad's music? Yeah.

Mom's? Hell no.
 
2013-09-10 12:48:40 AM
Lucky me!  I have two parents with horrible taste in music.
 
2013-09-10 12:49:42 AM
Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.
 
2013-09-10 12:50:04 AM
My dad listened to 50s-60s oldies, lots of motown and the Beatles plus a bit of country. My mom was all about classic rock, Talking Heads, Tom Petty and I distinctly remember her wearing a Live Throwing Copper t-shirt.

/yeah, they divorced, why did you ask
 
2013-09-10 12:50:52 AM
All things considered, the music at home could have been a lot worse than this:

upload.wikimedia.org

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-10 12:52:37 AM
My parents were huge country fans and I couldn't stand it. Still can't. I started listening to Beatles and Monkees when I was young but then got bit by the Hendrix, Who, Zeppelin, Santana, Tull bug and from then on was a fan of rocking out with a side order of prog. My kids all developed very different tastes (none of them like country or pop either thankfully) but they still enjoy what my wife and I listen to as well as their own stuff.

/my daughter sent me a video the other day of her 18 month daughter dancing to YYZ
//proud grandpa
 
2013-09-10 12:52:38 AM

Ringshadow: My mom has excellent taste in music. She got me into classic rock, into metal, into blues and swing. My dad's tastes? More questionable. Mostly he's into pop that I can barely stand but the zydeco's not bad.

/now my classmates? Terrible taste in music
//most hellish experience of my life was an Nsync concert


Tell me the ensuing beejay was worth it.  It better have been awesome to go through that shiat.

oceanup.com

southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com
 
2013-09-10 12:53:31 AM
I'm finding the best music in my life right now nearing 30 with the internet to find bands that have largely never been on the radio or performed anywhere near me, but I do find it to be a largely a combination of everything that I was wanting but not quite getting from the music I had growing up but I've still got a sweet spot for most of it.

Mom - 50s and 60s Oldies, Trans Siberian and Mannheim Steamroller
Dad - 70s hard rock and early metal
School - orchestra and jazz
Teenage Obsession - Queen
Now Translation - Progressive Metal
 
2013-09-10 12:54:31 AM
Growing up I hated it when my mom would play her Neil Diamond records.  Now, I kind of like the guy's music.
 
2013-09-10 12:56:31 AM
My parents gave me a deep love of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Santana, and Bonnie Raitt. They like bluesy rock music. Nothing wrong with that.
 
2013-09-10 12:57:05 AM
My Dad's record/cd collection got me into Peter Gabriel, Phil Collins, Dire Straits, Chris DeBurgh, classical music

My Uncle got me into Yes, Genesis, ELP, Sex Pistols, King Crimson, Talking Heads, Brian Eno, Robert Fripp, Tangerine Dream, Joy Division
 
2013-09-10 12:58:58 AM

HemlockStones: I got my son interested in Tom Waits.
All downhill from here...


I actually just started getting into Tom Waits a few years ago, only to find that my dad was a huge fan and I never knew it. I started getting into Waits shortly after realizing he was behind a song in Fight Club, and the intro to Muse's Hullabaloo live concert DVD (they used "What's He Building" as an intro, which I loved. They last used it for their Origin of Symmetry 10th anniversary show).

It's kind of sad to think I'll probably never get to see him in concert
 
2013-09-10 12:59:25 AM

RogermcAllen: My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.



Groan.
But...well-played, farker.
 
2013-09-10 12:59:28 AM
For some music this is spot on.  We always listened to Billy Joel, and my parents liked Jethro Tull so much, they named me Ian.

My dad initially hooked me on Dire Straits in the early 80's.

Some other music (Meatloaf, Traffic, Neil Diamond), not so much.

My parents were the typical late-60's/early-70's Boomers.
 
2013-09-10 01:00:11 AM
I still have and listen to my parents' Louis Prima & Charlie Parker LPs. I was one of those kids who spent all his allowance money on 45s at the local Sears and followed the radio charts. Years later when my folks finally gave up the big stereo for a downsized CD console [and joined the Columbia House CD club, hah! Even though I worked in a record store!] they let me have the old vinyl which I cherry-picked and sold/donated the rest. Also got some Janis Joplin, Simon & Garfunkel, even some decent cheese like Jackie Gleason. They were hipper than I gave them credit for.
Thanks Mom & Dad!

/the piano lessons eventually turned me into a James Booker & Professor Longhair fanatic, extra-infinity thanks for that
//still got most of my Sears 45s, too
 
2013-09-10 01:03:01 AM
RogermcAllen: My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.

That was pretty good.  I almost didn't catch it at first.
 
2013-09-10 01:04:15 AM
My mother had great taste in music. I like Neil Diamond, The Carpenters, etc.
 
2013-09-10 01:04:51 AM
I won't lie I used to blast her Tina Turner shiat
 
2013-09-10 01:05:13 AM
Well, my dad hated The Beach Boys during and after their best days and I thought they were great thirty years after their prime, so he may have been on to something.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:15 AM

Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


So tell us how you really feel.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:20 AM
If I'd had kids they'd probably have become musical omnivores since I listen to every musical genre except hip hop. Got Beethoven's Violin Concerto In D on right now. Earlier I was listening to Taiko drumming, ragtime piano, and songs from WWI.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:43 AM
True for me.  My parents, incidentally, listened to what was even then considered oldies.  So even though I grew up in the 80s/early 90s, my "formative" music was 60s/70s pop, which is generally good stuff, all except for the goddamn Beegees.

/Jeremiah was a bullfrog
 
2013-09-10 01:06:00 AM
My father really, really loved Gregorian Chanting. So, no.

/dnrtfa
 
2013-09-10 01:06:46 AM

Smeggy Smurf: My folks like country music.  I like country music.  My kids like country music.

[fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net image 400x400]


What country?
 
2013-09-10 01:07:04 AM
I can agree with the article.  Listened to Connie Francis, Dion, Frankie Avalon, Shirelles, Barry Manilow, Air Supply, a lot of Oldies & easy listening, and old Italian music growing up.  I can still listen to some of it without groaning - for instance, I can tolerate only 5 songs by Manilow.  Others, like John Denver and Louis Prima, I grew to enjoy on their own merit.  Weird thing, when my mom was recently in the hospital, I gravitated towards that older music while driving. I could have used Amon Amarth emotionally, but opted for Helen Reddy.

I pity any kid I'd ever have. Since I like a little of everything, they will not have a genre of their own to get me to hate.

/back in my day, we listened to Debbie Gibson and NKOTB, and we liked it
//no, we didn't, we said we did to be accepted by some idiot friends, and then put on Queensryche when they left
 
2013-09-10 01:07:57 AM
My father was a semi-pro musician.  He played trumpet with Tommy Dorsey, Glen Miller, Benny Goodman, and Gene Krupa.  I do love some of that music, just as I love  some of the music from my own childhood in the 1960s-1980s. But if I'm being honest with myself, there was a lot more crap released than great music, and that's true of every era.

What gets preserved and passed along to the next generation are the few "gems" that are released.  The majority of songs, even the ones that are hits, are soon forgotten.  In 2033, nobody is going to be singing "Friday" or "Gangnam Style" or whatever a Justin Beiber is, because those are forgettable.

If you grew up in the 1960s, you remember The Beatles, The Stones, The Beach Boys, and The Doors.  You have probably forgotten Little Joey and the Flips, Unit 4+2, and Whistling Jack Smith.

If you grew up in the 1970s, you remember Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and maybe T-Rex, The Ramones, The Clash, and the Sex Pistols.  You've forgotten Paul Humphrey and the Cool Aid Chemists, Jud Strunk, and the Wilton Place Street Band.

You remember The Police and REM from the 1980s, but you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats.  You remember Nirvana and Sound Garden from the 1990s, but you've forgotten N2Deep and Masta Ace Incorporated.

The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present.  It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.

Also, while we're on the subject, onions on my belt, get off my lawn, kids today with their hippin' and hoppin, and bippin' and boppin.  Get me a jell-o pudding pop, uphill both ways in the snow and furthermore comma.
 
2013-09-10 01:10:34 AM
Electric Lights Orchestra =/
 
2013-09-10 01:11:00 AM
My dad likes George Strait, Petula Clark, and the Texas Aggie Band.  I don't really care for those things, except for the Aggie band, but only when the team is playing.
 
2013-09-10 01:11:04 AM

Solty Dog: Dubstep is alright, though.


Does that crap even qualify as music?
 
2013-09-10 01:11:55 AM

TwowheelinTim: Solty Dog: Dubstep is alright, though.

Does that crap even qualify as music?


It does if you're a Transformer.
 
2013-09-10 01:12:55 AM
My dad knows more about classical music -- and musicians -- than I'll ever know, plus he still has the Benny Goodman 78s that he purchased on leave during WWII.  And he designed and built his own hi-fi system out of war-surplus hardware in the late 40s, to play the then-new LP records.  I can only aspire to those levels of coolness.
 
2013-09-10 01:13:34 AM

TwowheelinTim: Solty Dog: Dubstep is alright, though.

Does that crap even qualify as music?


Dubstep is to music what Twinkies are to food: a liw-quality guilty pleasure every once in a while, but very easy to get sick of.
 
2013-09-10 01:15:40 AM

FloydA: My father was a semi-pro musician.  He played trumpet with Tommy Dorsey, Glen Miller, Benny Goodman, and Gene Krupa.  I do love some of that music, just as I love  some of the music from my own childhood in the 1960s-1980s. But if I'm being honest with myself, there was a lot more crap released than great music, and that's true of every era.

What gets preserved and passed along to the next generation are the few "gems" that are released.  The majority of songs, even the ones that are hits, are soon forgotten.  In 2033, nobody is going to be singing "Friday" or "Gangnam Style" or whatever a Justin Beiber is, because those are forgettable.

If you grew up in the 1960s, you remember The Beatles, The Stones, The Beach Boys, and The Doors.  You have probably forgotten Little Joey and the Flips, Unit 4+2, and Whistling Jack Smith.

If you grew up in the 1970s, you remember Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and maybe T-Rex, The Ramones, The Clash, and the Sex Pistols.  You've forgotten Paul Humphrey and the Cool Aid Chemists, Jud Strunk, and the Wilton Place Street Band.

You remember The Police and REM from the 1980s, but you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats.  You remember Nirvana and Sound Garden from the 1990s, but you've forgotten N2Deep and Masta Ace Incorporated.

The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present.  It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.

Also, while we're on the subject, onions on my belt, get off my lawn, kids today with their hippin' and hoppin, and bippin' and boppin.  Get me a jell-o pudding pop, uphill both ways in the snow and furthermore comma.


Well stated.
 
2013-09-10 01:16:43 AM
Actually, I quite like Crystal Gayle, Joan Baez, Tom Jones, Neil Diamond, and Kenny Rogers. They may be "my parents' music", but they are all unabashedly in my collection.
 
2013-09-10 01:17:02 AM
I remember my parents playing Alabama, Bob Seger, The Righteous Brothers, Kenny Rogers, Charlie Daniels Band, etc, around the house when I was growing up.  Some of it I do still enjoy.  I'm not a huge fan of The Righteous Brothers, but I enjoy the country oldies and older souther rock still.
 
2013-09-10 01:20:30 AM
My dad's albums were Bob Newhart, Bill Cosby, and Jonathan Winters. Funny stuff still.
 
zez
2013-09-10 01:21:14 AM
My mom had a fantastic record collection, she was a member of columbia house and would always forget to send the card in so they would send whatever the record of the month was, but even before that she had great taste in music (I was born in 1967). My dad just listened to sports and AM talk radio. The few songs I remember him actively liking were Behind Closed Doors by Charlie Rich and Bob Segar's Old time rock n roll.

Both me and my younger brother picked up on my mom's music cues, but our much younger brother who was born after our parents' music buying days were over is into pop country (shudder).

My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior. The 5 year old likes to hear "rock music with drums and GUITAR!" It's much easier to keep the 5 year old happy when I'm around.
 
2013-09-10 01:24:23 AM
My mom saw The Doors, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and so on live in Los Angeles in the 60s. Her music history is enviable.
 
2013-09-10 01:25:04 AM
Burt Bacharach and Herb Alpert.  They're in my blood and I want them gone.
 
2013-09-10 01:26:58 AM

FloydA: The point is, the good stuff gets remembered; the dreck doesn't, so the music of the past always seems better, in retrospect, than the music of the present. It wasn't, in general, but the good parts are the only parts we remember.


Well put and true.

These days, I listen largely to what might be classified as folk rock. The modern variety, mostly.

I could compile a triple album of great songs that were made in just the last five years, so there's a lot of good material out there.

These are the good old days...  or some such.
 
2013-09-10 01:27:52 AM

zez: My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior.


Maybe you can compromise with this.  Dubstep djent progressive metal from the keyboardist in Textures.  Free on Bandcamp.
http://theulex.bandcamp.com/
 
2013-09-10 01:29:24 AM
My mom had the most unbelievable shiate in her collection, but never listened to ANY of it, so I had to discover all of it...the Who, Moody Bues, Traffic, Led Zep, The Dead, Pink Floyd, Beatles and the Stones.

She also had a lot of head scratchers of course...

What did she listen to? Utter garbage like Poco and jimmy buffet

I literally have no idea what happened in her album collection, did Martians come and plant the good stuff there? Did she suffer head trauma somewhere and lose all of her coolness? No idea.
 
2013-09-10 01:34:02 AM
Being an old Farker, I got a lot of the 50s-60s stuff, Elvis and the Beatles, But I also grew up in a household that played a lot of Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr, and Al Martino.

When my folks died, I inherited their old albums, and still pull them out once in a while to give them a listen.
 
zez
2013-09-10 01:34:23 AM

12349876: zez: My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior.

Maybe you can compromise with this.  Dubstep djent progressive metal from the keyboardist in Textures.  Free on Bandcamp.
http://theulex.bandcamp.com/


Thanks! I think my 9 year old might like this, the 5 year old likes more AC/DC type rock.
 
2013-09-10 01:36:06 AM
Enya?  ABBA?

How about NO?
 
2013-09-10 01:36:41 AM

FloydA: you've forgotten Tiffany and Men Without Hats


Are you shiatting me?  Have you seen the literal video for Safety Dance?  Goddamn funniest thing ever.

http://www.collegehumor.com/video/5812266/literal-safety-dance
 
2013-09-10 01:36:49 AM

zez: the 5 year old likes more AC/DC type rock.



Now that's a cool kid.
 
2013-09-10 01:39:03 AM
The thing that most confuses me about my parents is how the music they listen to is frozen in stone. Dad listens to one radio station (Rock 102) that near as I can tell has played the exact same 100 or so songs every single day since around 1985 or so. I'm pretty sure the poor man has heard shiat like Fly Like An Eagle and Life in the Fast Lane literally ten thousand times.

I get that you like what was around when you were young, but holy shiat that's like 15-20 years of music. You deserve more than 100 songs.
 
2013-09-10 01:39:28 AM
I do start with my dad's tastes in music. New wave, late 70's/early 80's punk. The logical continuation from there is my current tastes. Metal, Hard Rock, and the same new wave and some modern pop punk (Blink-182)
 
zez
2013-09-10 01:40:32 AM
My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.
 
2013-09-10 01:43:25 AM

gweilo8888: Philip Glass, beeyotches.

/that is all


Amateur,

tune into John Adams - The Chairman Dances, Short Ride in a Fast Machine...
 
2013-09-10 01:47:05 AM

Don't Troll Me Bro!: Tell me the ensuing beejay was worth it.  It better have been awesome to go through that shiat.

[oceanup.com image 545x574]

[southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com image 792x612]


Pfftt fark no. I was a chick who just moved to a new school in my junior year of highschool. My mom found out all the girls were going together to this NSync concert in Detroit and she thought it would be a great way for me to make friends. All I really learned was who I DID NOT want to be friends with. Surrounded by twatwaffles and I'm in, like, cargo shorts and a Styx shirt going WTF the entire concert. It was sold out! Like fifty thousand screaming fourteen year olds! I walked out of that tour through hell with my ears ringing so loud I could barely hear, which no metal show has ever done to me even when I shoved to the front. *shudder*

/Seen Styx twice, BB King, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Iced Earth, Opeth twice, Rob Zombie twice, Ozzy..
//.. Symphony X, Black Label Society, Dope, Flyleaf, Type O Negative, Queensryche, Pat Benatar, Mannheim Steamrollers..
///and so on, list not in chronological order
 
2013-09-10 01:52:51 AM

zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.


And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.
 
2013-09-10 01:52:53 AM

Ringshadow: Pfftt fark no. I was a chick who just moved to a new school in my junior year of highschool. My mom found out all the girls were going together to this NSync concert in Detroit and she thought it would be a great way for me to make friends. All I really learned was who I DID NOT want to be friends with. Surrounded by twatwaffles and I'm in, like, cargo shorts and a Styx shirt going WTF the entire concert. It was sold out! Like fifty thousand screaming fourteen year olds! I walked out of that tour through hell with my ears ringing so loud I could barely hear, which no metal show has ever done to me even when I shoved to the front. *shudder*


Dude....that's worse than going to a chick flick.
 
2013-09-10 01:53:06 AM
Could have been worse:
upload.wikimedia.orgupload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-10 01:53:12 AM

The_Sponge: Enya?  ABBA?

How about NO?


Hey now,  ABBA has been credited by many badass bands, especially other bands from Sweden, for their influence.  Tomas Haake has gone so far as to say they were a large part of what inspired him to play music.  I don't know about you, but I don't want to live in a world without Meshuggah.

/Hey guys. We've got a long night on the bus ahead. I've got an oversized pair of sunglasses and a red pen, and Tomas forgot to put his sticks in the case while we were packing up. Let's get intoxicated and make the funniest goddamn music video ever.
 
2013-09-10 01:59:39 AM

Ringshadow: I was a chick


You're not now?  (I already looked like an asshole, why not)

Seriously though, that sounds like a well-intentioned thing a parent does that just doesn't help anything.  That sounds awful.
 
2013-09-10 02:01:26 AM

AndyChrist_AUS: Amateur,

tune into John Adams - The Chairman Dances, Short Ride in a Fast Machine...


Never let it be said I'm not willing to experiment. Suggestion taken, could use a break from the Glass tonight anyhow. (I usually put something of his on when I'm overworked and feeling manic. Which sums up tonight.)
 
zez
2013-09-10 02:04:38 AM

TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.


One thing I did like and brought me back was that they would just lay on the floor flipping the album back and forth looking at it and the inner sleeve. Some things never change.
 
zez
2013-09-10 02:05:58 AM
album COVER, not the album
 
2013-09-10 02:06:22 AM

TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.


Didn't the music industry start out issuing singles?  It seems that we're going back to where we started - one track to catch interest.  It has some positive aspects: no more filler tracks.  Buy only what you want, not $10-15 for one or two good songs and never listen to the whole album.

On the other hand, some albums had gems that weren't played on air.  Occasionally, the singles were the weaker songs.  The continuous play of a concept album will be gone also. While it's great to chop up an album like The Wall or Operation: Mindcrime into singles, it loses the feel to only have those few songs and none of the other tracks.
 
2013-09-10 02:08:24 AM
Go Neil ...
thumbs1.ebaystatic.com
 
2013-09-10 02:09:32 AM

TuteTibiImperes: I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing. Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.


I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.
 
2013-09-10 02:12:49 AM
I still listen to David Byrne. Heck the first "music video" I remember watching was a rented copy of "Stop Making Sense". A friend just turned me on to the stuff he's been doing with some lady calling herself St. Vincent.
 
2013-09-10 02:13:28 AM
I make my kids listen to P-Funk and Loretta Lynn
 
2013-09-10 02:14:54 AM
Sorry Subby, but I will never tolerate the BeeGees, let alone enjoy them.
 
2013-09-10 02:16:22 AM

Don't Troll Me Bro!: I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.


You're listening to the wrong radio. There is good radio out there. Clear Channel does not own it.
 
2013-09-10 02:17:20 AM
I got Pink Floyd, Sabbath, Enya, Clannad, Supertramp, Alan Parsons Project, and Dusty Springfield.

/hiphop head
 
2013-09-10 02:19:15 AM
I had a science teacher in 6th grade, Mr. Wilson. Huge Harry Chapin fan...one quiz we had was on the lyrics for Cat's in the Cradle. The one question that sticks out still, "when the son is giving his dad excuses why he can't visit, what did he say his kids were sick with?".

I took my kids to see The Police on their tour, good times!
 
2013-09-10 02:20:00 AM

gweilo8888: Don't Troll Me Bro!: I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.

You're listening to the wrong radio. There is good radio out there. Clear Channel does not own it.


There's a station out there with no DJs or commercials and it only plays songs I like?
 
2013-09-10 02:20:39 AM
No.
 
2013-09-10 02:21:21 AM
My new plan, to listen to The worst brain rotting boy band 90's crap in front of my kid. He'll have no choice but to join a boy band.
 
2013-09-10 02:21:48 AM
Growing up on trips I would get what was played on the oldies station (50s-60s) pop/rock. At home a majority of the albums were what we now think of as classic rock and southern rock from the 60s and 70s. I could have done worse. My Dad also took me to see some concerts that were great like Crosby Stills and Nash, Grateful Dead, Skynyrd sans Ronnie of course.

One song ill always stop and listen to if I hear it is Crimson and Clover by Tommy James and the Shondells. I have no idea why I am so fond of that song in particular.
 
2013-09-10 02:23:49 AM
My parents' music from the 50's was good.
Early 60's saw rock degrade into gimmicks and cheese.
I am not fond of the late 60's hippie stuff but I can acknowledge there was talent.
The early 70's was garbage.
Late 70's you still had some junk in the mainstream but good bands and singers were rising up in all genres.
Good music peaked around 1984 - all forms of rock, rap, punk, pop, etc. even the bad stuff was good.
Around 1990, pop music was shiat but the alternative genres were good and in the early 90s there was still lots of good stuff to be found.
Around the mid-90's music all around went downhill and has been going downhill since and never recovered.
 
2013-09-10 02:26:01 AM

gweilo8888: Don't Troll Me Bro!: I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.

You're listening to the wrong radio. There is good radio out there. Clear Channel does not own it.


I know there's good radio out there.  I just choose to search for stuff I like on the sources I mentioned earlier.  We're lucky enough to have a purely metal and punk record store in Madison, so when I find something I want I go there and ask about it.  If they don't have what I'm looking for they try to find it and get a copy.
 
2013-09-10 02:27:22 AM

Don't Troll Me Bro!: TuteTibiImperes: I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing. Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

I've found it often means "this is the easiest thing on the album to completely digest in one listen, even after we butcher half of it completely off to get it under 3 minutes."  Usually the really good stuff, like the stuff you can listen to for years and never get sick of, takes several listens to start appreciating, which is why it's not on the radio.


I agree, some of my favorite songs are ones that were never released as singles.  Some albums certainly have some filler, I'll admit, but overall there are usually some gems that never get air play.

I picked up one of my favorite albums ever from a 99 cent CD bin at Circuit City over ten years ago, almost every track is gold.  I'm not sure if any of it ever had big airplay since it was originally released when I was 8, but I'm glad I decided 'what the hell, it's cheap' and picked it up.   House of Freaks - Tantilla.
 
2013-09-10 02:27:55 AM

gweilo8888: AndyChrist_AUS: Amateur,

tune into John Adams - The Chairman Dances, Short Ride in a Fast Machine...

Never let it be said I'm not willing to experiment. Suggestion taken, could use a break from the Glass tonight anyhow. (I usually put something of his on when I'm overworked and feeling manic. Which sums up tonight.)


Drop back in a let me know how the experience went, judging from your openness - I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

If not, well...meh
 
2013-09-10 02:29:16 AM

The_Sponge: Enya?  ABBA?

How about NO?


Could be worse. I used Enya as Step 1 in weaning my mom off her Zamfir obsession.
 
2013-09-10 02:29:34 AM

TuteTibiImperes: don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.


It's like buying the Zeppelin tune Good Times Bad Times off their debut album and never bothering with the rest.

I dont get it either.
 
2013-09-10 02:32:09 AM

TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.


On one hand you aren't spending $15 to get the one or 2 songs that you liked and wanted while the rest of the CD could suck. On the other hand you run the risk of missing out on some good music that you didn't know about if you only buy a couple of individual tracks.

I grew up on cassettes then cds and now digital. I still have the cassettes and cds in a case logic holder forgotten in a box somewhere. I've ultimately gone digital ala carte but I try to preview an album on youtube or other site and then buy. Hopefully I'm not missing out on anything
 
2013-09-10 02:35:37 AM

AndyChrist_AUS: gweilo8888: AndyChrist_AUS: Amateur,

tune into John Adams - The Chairman Dances, Short Ride in a Fast Machine...

Never let it be said I'm not willing to experiment. Suggestion taken, could use a break from the Glass tonight anyhow. (I usually put something of his on when I'm overworked and feeling manic. Which sums up tonight.)

Drop back in a let me know how the experience went, judging from your openness - I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

If not, well...meh


Yeah, not bad. Would listen again. Probably will. ;-)

/I'll honestly listen to most things
//like food, you don't know what you like until you try it
 
2013-09-10 02:35:49 AM

Igor Jakovsky: TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

On one hand you aren't spending $15 to get the one or 2 songs that you liked and wanted while the rest of the CD could suck. On the other hand you run the risk of missing out on some good music that you didn't know about if you only buy a couple of individual tracks.

I grew up on cassettes then cds and now digital. I still have the cassettes and cds in a case logic holder forgotten in a box somewhere. I've ultimately gone digital ala carte but I try to preview an album on youtube or other site and then buy. Hopefully I'm not missing out on anything


I've gone with Xbox Music (horrible name for the service as it really has nothing to do with the Xbox).  I'm sure there are similar services out there, but it basically allows you to download as many tracks or albums as you like from a pretty complete catalog, as long as you keep paying the $10/month.  It also lets you download the music locally to your phone, so I can use it without eating up my data plan when I'm driving around.

I figure it's less than buying a single CD per month, and it gives me as much as I want, so I end up ahead.  Of course, if i ever cancel it I lose everything I have through it, so that's the downside, but for now it works out well.
 
2013-09-10 02:39:35 AM
Born in the early 70's my parents were 37 & 40 years old when I was born. To this day, I think of AM news talk radio and cheesy Italian music when I think of my parents choice of entertainment.

Luckily for me my much older siblings exposed me to contemporary music from the day. I am pretty well rounded now musically and have a good ear. I can't sing or play a damn thing but I can make that tune in a flash!
 
2013-09-10 02:43:35 AM
Peter, Paul, and Mary? Joan Baez? Johnny Cash? There will always be room for them among my Jazz, classical, and world music highlights. Thanks mom and dad
 
2013-09-10 02:44:43 AM

Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?


Check out The Avett Brothers, Iron & Wine, Fleet Foxes, Mumford & Sons, and Allison Krauss just to name a few. Good music is still out there, you just have to dig deeper.
 
2013-09-10 02:45:37 AM

SevenizGud: I secretly love gospel? Somehow I doubt it.


this
/ seriously: "Are you washed in the BLOOD of the lamb"
What kind of  farking psycho thought THAT up AND to make it a song?
"Hey kids, go grab that lamb over there and we'll slit it's throat! Then we can all take a sponge bath with it's blood!" Fun for all!
//yes, it get it is an allegory. Still a farked up one.
 
2013-09-10 02:45:50 AM

gweilo8888: AndyChrist_AUS: gweilo8888: AndyChrist_AUS: Amateur,

tune into John Adams - The Chairman Dances, Short Ride in a Fast Machine...

Never let it be said I'm not willing to experiment. Suggestion taken, could use a break from the Glass tonight anyhow. (I usually put something of his on when I'm overworked and feeling manic. Which sums up tonight.)

Drop back in a let me know how the experience went, judging from your openness - I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

If not, well...meh

Yeah, not bad. Would listen again. Probably will. ;-)

/I'll honestly listen to most things
//like food, you don't know what you like until you try it


I find that Adams music grows on you. Like food, the setting and mood are vital components of the whole experience, and altering one changes the entire construct... Glad my $0.02 was useful
 
2013-09-10 02:47:24 AM

The_Sponge: Dude....that's worse than going to a chick flick.


God I don't watch those either. I like action movies and old horror and stuff. Some women watch Magic Mike. I watch Iron Man. Mm, yes, RDJ. I'd sooner light myself on fire than watch "The Notebook."

Don't Troll Me Bro!: You're not now?  (I already looked like an asshole, why not)

Seriously though, that sounds like a well-intentioned thing a parent does that just doesn't help anything.  That sounds awful.


... Touche. Oh god it's early, ugh.
And yeah even before the show I was like, seriously mom? Seriously? I mean don't get me wrong they were nice enough girls but I couldn't carry on a conversation with them. It's like, uh, well I'm not wearing makeup I'm seriously carsick from the trip and I don't know any of the band member's names*. I ended up making friends with all the D&D geeks and goths once class started.

/*TBF I can't name band members in most of the band names I really like
//Unless it's a bone of contention like the Anya vs Tarja Nightwish thing
 
2013-09-10 02:48:00 AM

Begoggle: My parents' music from the 50's was good.
Early 60's saw rock degrade into gimmicks and cheese.
I am not fond of the late 60's hippie stuff but I can acknowledge there was talent.
The early 70's was garbage.
Late 70's you still had some junk in the mainstream but good bands and singers were rising up in all genres.
Good music peaked around 1984 - all forms of rock, rap, punk, pop, etc. even the bad stuff was good.
Around 1990, pop music was shiat but the alternative genres were good and in the early 90s there was still lots of good stuff to be found.
Around the mid-90's music all around went downhill and has been going downhill since and never recovered.


I mostly agree except the early 70s, I mean thats like right around the time Zeppelin, Floyd, and the Who was at thier prime and around the time Sabbath and Priest launched.
 
2013-09-10 02:51:17 AM
still enjoy my parents talk/sport/commercial radio,
but not as much as grandpa's
www.texasplayboys.net
/hot like bob wills is still the king
//yah, haw, haa
///is what i imagined it.... in reality it was three dog night on 8 track
 
2013-09-10 02:51:25 AM

ladyfortuna: Cewley: this is total bullshiat. i grew up in the 60s. i wasn't a huge fan of my parents music, but it was certainly tolerable, and in some cases quite good. the reason my children (and grand children) like music from my favorite era is that ever since music that was yelled (not sung) by angry people became what was played on mtv and the radio, popular music has been in the toilet. then add the horrible vocal masturbation by the likes of mariah carey, and all her clones, what's left?

Check out The Avett Brothers, Iron & Wine, Fleet Foxes, Mumford & Sons, and Allison Krauss just to name a few. Good music is still out there, you just have to dig deeper.


I love Alison Krauss.
 
2013-09-10 02:59:17 AM
My dad's taste in music went through various stages, as it does with most people.  I distinctly remember his protest folk music phase.  I never could stand Joan Baez and hated that for a few years he played her records (actual vinyl) all the farking time.  But during that phase he also picked up the Carly Simon No Secrets album.  Which every teenage boy loved, even if he never actually played the album.  GIS it, you'll understand.

Fortunately, he got over that and we did agree on some music.  He liked Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon, but not really any of their other work.  He especially loved classical guitar, which I also enjoyed.  He never cared for The Blues, which is my preferred genre.
 
2013-09-10 03:01:36 AM
When I was barely old enough to remember, Dad used to plonk a huge set of headphones on my tiny little ears and I got exposed to all kinds of strange stuff that my parents grew up with...from classical to folk, to 50's rock n' roll.

I think I was probably able to thread the reel-to-reel successfully by the time I was 3 or 4, and entertain myself for hours.
 
2013-09-10 03:02:09 AM
 
2013-09-10 03:13:28 AM

Kuta: What does the fox say?


The coyote says Aha ha haha ha ahhhhh

  He was smiling through his own personal hell
  dropped his last dime in a wishing well
  but he wished too close and then he fell
  now he's Casper the Friendly Ghost....
 
2013-09-10 03:15:47 AM

Kuta: What does the fox say?


"Nixon and Reagan eras had the best music"
 
2013-09-10 03:17:47 AM

Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.


If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.
 
2013-09-10 03:20:41 AM

LewDux: Kuta: What does the fox say?

"Nixon and Reagan eras had the best music"


So vote Republican?

Also Shrub Sr was POTUS when the Seatle stuff broke back east circa 92.
 
2013-09-10 03:22:32 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.


Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.
 
2013-09-10 03:23:10 AM

Oldiron_79: LewDux: Kuta: What does the fox say?

"Nixon and Reagan eras had the best music"

So vote Republican?

Also Shrub Sr was POTUS when the Seatle stuff broke back east circa 92.


So blame Bush?
 
2013-09-10 03:23:21 AM
Which parent, subby?
 
2013-09-10 03:25:51 AM

OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.


Yessir, and then some.
 
2013-09-10 03:25:58 AM

Raging Whore Moans: Which parent, subby?


Ooh, good point.  My parents were divorced.  My mom went on to put herself through school as a cocktail waitress in a jazz nightclub.  She tended to date jazz musicians at that time.  Unfortunately, I was too young to really appreciate jazz at that time.

/lived with my dad and the biatch he married
//the biatch had the worst possible taste in music imaginable
 
2013-09-10 03:28:41 AM

TuteTibiImperes: The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.


d2heru13qkbk4q.cloudfront.net

/you really want the whole album?
 
2013-09-10 03:31:29 AM
Um, no. My mother, bless her heart, is the most tasteless music listener I know, and that includes my 12yo niece. My father? Well, he did get me into Beethoven, but now he spends his retirement years seeing the most cheesy shows and musicals out there. To me it's sad, because with his money he could be supporting real art and talent, but that only happens when I take him to something.

My older siblings, OTOH, have very solid taste. My older brothers followed Zeppelin, Metallica, etc. from the very beginning. My sister had her 80's hair and glam-rock years, but since she's been very astute.
 
2013-09-10 03:41:52 AM
Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Herb Albert, The Kingston Trio and Johnny Cash, yes. Perry Como and other not-rock'n'roll '50s easy-listening, not so much.

Discovered early rock'n'roll without their help (they were both born in '43, just slightly pre-Boomer).

Discovered swing and big band through my grandparents.

Much prefer my grandparents music to my parents music.

/Artie Shaw & Louis Prima FTW
 
2013-09-10 03:46:03 AM

OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.



During summers when I was a kid, I used to go with Dad. The shop area always had one of two stations playing non stop. One was classic country, the other was an oldies station that was heavy on Motown. Needless to say, I grew an early fondness for Motown, especially Smokey Robinson.

Later, in my 20s, I discovered just what a panty remover Smokey's music really is.
 
2013-09-10 03:47:11 AM

stoli n coke: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.


During summers when I was a kid, I used to go with Dad to his work. The shop area always had one of two stations playing non stop. One was classic country, the other was an oldies station that was heavy on Motown. Needless to say, I grew an early fondness for Motown, especially Smokey Robinson.

Later, in my 20s, I discovered just what a panty remover Smokey's music really is.



FTFM
 
2013-09-10 03:49:11 AM

Duck_of_Doom: TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

Didn't the music industry start out issuing singles?  It seems that we're going back to where we started - one track to catch interest.  It has some positive aspects: no more filler tracks.  Buy only what you want, not $10-15 for one or two good songs and never listen to the whole album.

On the other hand, some albums had gems that weren't played on air.  Occasionally, the singles were the weaker songs.  The continuous play of a concept album will be gone also. While it's great to chop up an album like The Wall or Operation: Mindcrime into singles, it loses the feel to only have those few songs and none of the other tracks.


Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.
 
2013-09-10 03:52:56 AM
I'm happy with my parents' musical tastes.  Dad enjoyed classical music, rock, and jazz; mom was into folk and jazz.  Dad was a good enough classical pianist to be a professional, and mom was a good amateur singer.

Now in my 20s I like some music that they hate (punk, rap, hip hop), but we share a common appreciation for the aforementioned genres.  Most of all I'm glad that they gave me a musical upbringing - piano lessons, concerts, something always playing in the house, the confidence to improvise.
 
2013-09-10 03:56:34 AM
My father was a little bit gospel (with some classical); my mother was entirely gospel.

The Carpenters were considered "Satanic". It was just short of a brawl being able to pay with my own money to see Air Supply at the local county fair (the one and only year we camped there [for church reasons]) when I was 12ish.

Didn't really hear what they call non-soft-rock until I was 14 (if I remember correctly, it was Sex (I'm A Virgin...) by Berlin).
Didn't see MTV for the first time until 15.
Homeschooled until I was kicked out and, de facto, disowned at 14 (looooong story with a JUST-non-crushingly-depressing ending) (I'm still standing!)
Yes, my first concert was Air Supply. (the other two options were Hank Williams, Jr. [certain of that one] and, I think, Tommy Tutone (of 867-5309/Jenny fame).
There's very little gospel music that doesn't make me mentally take the fetal position when I hear it today.
 
2013-09-10 03:57:59 AM

Igor Jakovsky: Growing up on trips I would get what was played on the oldies station (50s-60s) pop/rock. At home a majority of the albums were what we now think of as classic rock and southern rock from the 60s and 70s. I could have done worse. My Dad also took me to see some concerts that were great like Crosby Stills and Nash, Grateful Dead, Skynyrd sans Ronnie of course.

One song ill always stop and listen to if I hear it is Crimson and Clover by Tommy James and the Shondells. I have no idea why I am so fond of that song in particular.


That's a great song. Ever heard the full album version? It's almost 6 minutes and a lot trippier.

Begoggle: My parents' music from the 50's was good.
Early 60's saw rock degrade into gimmicks and cheese.
I am not fond of the late 60's hippie stuff but I can acknowledge there was talent.
The early 70's was garbage.
Late 70's you still had some junk in the mainstream but good bands and singers were rising up in all genres.
Good music peaked around 1984 - all forms of rock, rap, punk, pop, etc. even the bad stuff was good.

Around 1990, pop music was shiat but the alternative genres were good and in the early 90s there was still lots of good stuff to be found.
Around the mid-90's music all around went downhill and has been going downhill since and never recovered.


9/10 - This is how trolling is done.

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.


I just hate it. They like most of my stuff though, so...
 
2013-09-10 04:01:17 AM
...take the fetal position on those extremely rare occasions when I allow myself to be exposed to it today.

altered.
 
2013-09-10 04:02:12 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.


I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).
 
2013-09-10 04:03:25 AM

Abacus9: Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.


upload.wikimedia.org

If you say so.
 
2013-09-10 04:11:08 AM

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Abacus9: Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 400x399]

If you say so.


What's your point?
 
2013-09-10 04:22:25 AM

Abacus9: Duck_of_Doom: TuteTibiImperes: zez: My kids had been pestering me for years to take the turntable out of the closet so they could hear a record so recently I did and dug out my record collection. I would put one one and go sit to listen and all I heard is "I don't like this song, how can we skip?" "I want to hear this band now" "I gotta pee, can you pause it?"

I remembered LPs as being a relaxing 20+ minutes where you didn't have to do anything. It was weird seeing how much music listening has changed when it was all thrown back into my face.

And even more since the market has shifted towards digital download instead of CDs.  The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.  I grew up when CDs were king, if I hear a song I like, I get the whole album, and listen through each album at a time, I don't get the whole 'just get one track' thing.  Just because one bit is getting the radio play doesn't mean it's the only worthwhile thing on the album.

Didn't the music industry start out issuing singles?  It seems that we're going back to where we started - one track to catch interest.  It has some positive aspects: no more filler tracks.  Buy only what you want, not $10-15 for one or two good songs and never listen to the whole album.

On the other hand, some albums had gems that weren't played on air.  Occasionally, the singles were the weaker songs.  The continuous play of a concept album will be gone also. While it's great to chop up an album like The Wall or Operation: Mindcrime into singles, it loses the feel to only have those few songs and none of the other tracks.

Singles were only really issued as promotion for a band or an album. Most albums I'd say are better than just the singles, as singles are just marketing material, that's why they're mostly short and catchy with no real depth.



Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.
 
2013-09-10 04:25:06 AM

Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).


Rock on man.
 
2013-09-10 04:29:43 AM

stoli n coke: Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.


Led Zeppelin refused to record singles. The record company could do what they wanted. That's why much of their stuff is good, they refused to package it into a poppy 3 minute crapbasket. Albums were a bigger deal in those days than before. I grew up in the early 90's, and it was the same. If Soundgarden had a new song on the radio, I don't know a single person that went out and bought the single.
 
2013-09-10 04:30:21 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).

Rock on man.


Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.
 
2013-09-10 04:34:33 AM

Abacus9: Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.



How ya doin'? Pleased (?) to make your virtual acquaintance.

over 40, not yet 50.

/although, honestly, I prefer Stax.
 
2013-09-10 04:38:30 AM

Abacus9: stoli n coke: Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.

Led Zeppelin refused to record singles. The record company could do what they wanted. That's why much of their stuff is good, they refused to package it into a poppy 3 minute crapbasket. Albums were a bigger deal in those days than before. I grew up in the early 90's, and it was the same. If Soundgarden had a new song on the radio, I don't know a single person that went out and bought the single.



And Stairway To Heaven became a breakout single mainly because it was a song long enough to allow DJs to take a smoke break.

Still, in the 50s and 60s, many artists would put out singles between albums just to keep interest going. Since audiences were fickle, it was a safer bet than waiting 2 years for an album to get finished.

Plus, you have to remember, those were the jukebox days. Bands wanted to keep their stuff playing at bars, clubs, restaurants, etc, so putting out a single or two every couple of months while working on the album was just good business.

It didn't really start getting album centric until around the Abbey Road days.
 
2013-09-10 04:46:31 AM

Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).

Rock on man.

Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.


What's the first Motown song you think of?
 
2013-09-10 04:48:03 AM
Mom gave us classical music, John Philips Sousa and honky tonk piano.  She also gave us Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich and Glen Miller.  I love them still.  My kids have had my teenaged musical taste inflicted on them their entire lives.  Yet, they still sing along to the classics from the sixties and seventies.  It's okay, we're only bleeding.
 
2013-09-10 04:51:07 AM
Was that a typo in the headline, or does this only apply to one parent? Both of mine like the same stuff.
 
2013-09-10 04:54:53 AM

stoli n coke: Abacus9: stoli n coke: Well, you could argue that in the 50s and 60s, singles were a way to gauge whether there was enough interest for an album. That's why the Beatles had like 25 songs out before Meet the Beatles came out, which only had 8.

By the time they started putting out albums, they already had 2 or 3 greatest hits records.

Led Zeppelin refused to record singles. The record company could do what they wanted. That's why much of their stuff is good, they refused to package it into a poppy 3 minute crapbasket. Albums were a bigger deal in those days than before. I grew up in the early 90's, and it was the same. If Soundgarden had a new song on the radio, I don't know a single person that went out and bought the single.


And Stairway To Heaven became a breakout single mainly because it was a song long enough to allow DJs to take a smoke break. -

Yes, but it wasn't recorded to be a single.

Still, in the 50s and 60s, many artists would put out singles between albums just to keep interest going. Since audiences were fickle, it was a safer bet than waiting 2 years for an album to get finished. - This is true, and occasionally still happens, but is still promotional more than anything. They don't make a ton of money.

Plus, you have to remember, those were the jukebox days. Bands wanted to keep their stuff playing at bars, clubs, restaurants, etc, so putting out a single or two every couple of months while working on the album was just good business.

It didn't really start getting album centric until around the Abbey Road days. -
Yeah, and in those early days it wasn't really an album so much as a collection of songs recorded around the same time. In the really old days you would fit a symphony onto one record, but popular music had much shorter songs recorded onto the same format. When real albums started coming out, the singles were basically just to promote them and to promote the tour (where the real money was). It's sad to see things turning back to single-centric music, as a good album was a true art.
 
2013-09-10 04:56:50 AM

ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: ghostfacekillahrabbit: OgreMagi: ghostfacekillahrabbit: Abacus9: Bullshiat. My parents loved Motown, which I mostly despise. They had a couple of decent 45's but other than that, no. Although they actually like a lot of what I listen to, even the newer stuff. There's no accounting for taste, but by most accounts, I have better taste than they do.

If you despise Motown, you're wrong about the "by most accounts" parts. Nttawwt. Power to ya.

Motown produced some of the best "getting laid" music of all time.

Yessir, and then some.

I don't know a single chick that listens to that crap. All the ones I know are/were into grunge, metal and classic rock (a few are into country which I also can't stand).

Rock on man.

Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.

What's the first Motown song you think of?


My Girl, I guess.
 
2013-09-10 05:00:08 AM
I grew up with my parents listening to the likes of Fleetwood Mac, Alabama, The Statler Brothers, The Oak Ridge Boys, Eddie Rabbit, Simon and Garfunkel, Elton John, Bob Seger, and Jim Croce.  I still, to this day, get choked up listening to Croce's "Operator"......
 
2013-09-10 05:00:41 AM
I was born then albums were popular, am I not clever?
 
2013-09-10 05:01:56 AM
My dad taught me the love of swing and Big Band. He used to put a speaker under my pillow when I was a tot.

I learned to love the Blues on my own.
 
2013-09-10 05:40:40 AM

12349876: zez: My 9 year old is into dubstep but for some reason it helps to calm his ADD behavior.

Maybe you can compromise with this.  Dubstep djent progressive metal from the keyboardist in Textures.  Free on Bandcamp.
http://theulex.bandcamp.com/


Awesome stuff, thanks for the link
 
2013-09-10 06:20:35 AM
If you mean the Jazz and Swing they listened to as younger people, yes.  If you mean the elevator music they listen to as senior citizens, then no.
 
2013-09-10 06:31:35 AM
Hang down your head Tom Dooley, hang down your head and cry...

Fighting soldiers from the sky, fearless men....

It was an itsy, bitsy, teeny, weenie, yellow polka dot bikini
 
2013-09-10 06:39:41 AM
My mom loved Big Band/Swing.  My dad loved 30s-40s standards, and Don McLean.

I love all kinds of music, so yeah, I love their stuff too.
 
2013-09-10 06:41:44 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: My step-father was into things like Nelson Eddie and Jeanette McDonald

/wasn't real fond of it
//but I can name Indian Love Call in two notes


When I'm calling you-ooo-ooo-ooo...
 
2013-09-10 06:43:48 AM
My children are doomed.  Dad is playing 70-80's heavy metal on constant rotation in his car, and I swing from Neil Diamond to Hank Jr. and Merle Haggard, with some Alice Cooper thrown in, in mine.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA!
 
2013-09-10 06:48:05 AM

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: TuteTibiImperes: The kids in HS or maybe college now who grew up with iTunes and whatnot seem to think of music as a track by track thing, you like one or two songs by a band, and you buy those, but you don't get the whole album.

[d2heru13qkbk4q.cloudfront.net image 685x630]

/you really want the whole album?


The recording of this was bankrolled by the sister of the founder of Stax Records, after her share of the company was bought out. Dees was a DJ in Memphis..RSO distributed it. Estelle Axton was originally half owner of Stax, and ran the record shop attached to the studio and knew what would be popular with frightening regularity.
 
2013-09-10 06:50:46 AM
This record scarred me for life.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-10 06:51:41 AM

LiteWerk: Hang down your head Tom Dooley, hang down your head and cry...

Fighting soldiers from the sky, fearless men....

It was an itsy, bitsy, teeny, weenie, yellow polka dot bikini


In 1814 we took a little trip...
 
2013-09-10 06:56:20 AM

Sinbox: Abacus9: Just saying, I don't know a single person under age 60 who listens to Motown.


How ya doin'? Pleased (?) to make your virtual acquaintance.

over 40, not yet 50.

/although, honestly, I prefer Stax.


45 currently, I've loved Motown for years. But I'm also a wannabe bass player, so those James Jamerson and Bill Babbett basslines (and Carol Kaye from the later LA sessions) are the shiat.
 
2013-09-10 06:56:21 AM
My parents listened to the classical music station on the radio. It's the background sound of my childhood, masking the silence that was my parents unwillingness/inability to communicate with each other. To this day, hearing classical music fills me with low-level anxiety and a general feeling of despair.
 
2013-09-10 06:57:02 AM
My dad went from Beatles to ZZ Top. Its my mom's taste in music that sucked.
 
2013-09-10 07:04:03 AM
Wait. Johnny Cash is only mentioned twice on this page? It's the only thing my grandfather, father, and I really agreed about. Well that and Hank Williams. Senior. Junior tries too hard.
 
2013-09-10 07:19:00 AM
I'm a metalhead, which means that my kids will secretly love Pantera, Machine Head, Judas Priest, and Motorhead.

But when they're teenagers the little shiatheads will probably become hip-hop or dubstep fans just to annoy me.
 
2013-09-10 07:47:47 AM

mr lawson: SevenizGud: I secretly love gospel? Somehow I doubt it.

this
/ seriously: "Are you washed in the BLOOD of the lamb"
What kind of  farking psycho thought THAT up AND to make it a song?
"Hey kids, go grab that lamb over there and we'll slit it's throat! Then we can all take a sponge bath with it's blood!" Fun for all!
//yes, it get it is an allegory. Still a farked up one.


Some of the... uh... urban gospel is really catchy and well produced. Super musicians and great choirs. It's great sounding music. If you have a system that can reproduce bass well, this will do it.
 
2013-09-10 07:56:56 AM

gweilo8888: Philip Glass, beeyotches.

/that is all


I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.
 
2013-09-10 07:58:56 AM
I'm against it.

Somewhere along the line, somebody got the idea that music was a disposable commodity with an expiration date. And a preferred origin, for that matter. That's pure marketing nonsense, and all of the arguments that stem from it are pretty much uninformed, or disinformed.

If you can develop an immunity to the small instrumental and stylistic differences, any age or origin of music is valid and fair for consideration. Al Jolson and Cab Calloway are bumptious and joyful, Fats Waller is sly and puckish, and George Formby and Eddie Cantor are pretty hysterical, in a Voh-de-oh-doh kind of way. Middle Eastern Oud music is half-brother to Indian Sitar and Sarangi ragas, and Irish Trad is a direct cousin to American folk.

In short, there's a lot of good stuff out there everywhere and everywhen, if you're open to the experience.

The trick is getting exposure to it. Exposure is what creates the immunity to marketing and vox populi claims of obsolescence, and it's hard to come by. Instead of accepting that children are programmed to enjoy certain old music because somebody gave them a cookie while they were listening to "Freddy and the Dreamers," perhaps it is as simple as they were exposed to music they found enjoyable before they were programmed by society to Not enjoy "that old stuff."

There are plenty of examples of people on this board who rejected their parent's taste in music, which shoots holes in the Pavlovian theory put forth in the article. The lazy insistence that cause-and-effect rules every aspect of human existence strips people of credit for their individual choices, at any age.
 
2013-09-10 08:00:19 AM

RogermcAllen: My dad used to listen to this song about cats and the moon all the time.  I would ask him what it was, but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't seen him for a while.


snuff3r: My poor kids.. they get an ecclectic mix of 70-80s music via their mother and really, really heavy shiat via me.

Though my kids tell me they hate my music I have to admit pride when I catch my 2yo daughter "dancing" to Slayer or Gojira or whatever i'm listening to.

How does one dance to Gojira?  Are you sure that your music doesn't actually send the child into seizures?


http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/Cat's-in-the-Cradle-lyrics-Harr y-Chapin/BA220879AAA70B8A48256CAA002DFE9B
 
2013-09-10 08:01:45 AM
my dad is weird.  he doesn't really listen to music.  he doesn't own any music of his own and he's never once expressed liking a particular band or singer.  he just turns on classic rock radio stations and refers to it as "background noise."  he doesn't actually listen to it or pay any attention to it.  he's the only person i think i've ever known who really has no interest in music.

my mom on the other hand loves music but doesn't seem to have any particular favorites.  when i was a kid in the 80s, she listened to bon jovi and def leppard just like me, and in the 90s listened to pop stuff like collective soul and hootie and the blowfish.  she claims her favorite band is the bee gees, but in my entire life i've never heard her actually listen to the bee gees.  she also listens to oldies stations and country music, she likes almost everything.
 
2013-09-10 08:03:39 AM
I think this is just scientific proof some music is better than other.

I was super proud the other day when my 11 year old daughter suddenly squealed with delight when we were at the yogurt shop. Turned out Sinatra's "Strangers In The Night" had just started playing. Unless she's responding to racial memories from her great grandmother, it just means good music is timeless.
 
2013-09-10 08:04:05 AM
My dad got me listening to Grand Funk Railroad Bo Diddley, so yeah
 
2013-09-10 08:05:02 AM
That would be Grand Funk AND Bo Diddley. 'Scuse me for just getting off a 12 hour shift
 
2013-09-10 08:05:40 AM
I'm not immume to it....

eil.com

// Damn good album... especially stoned
 
2013-09-10 08:09:02 AM
My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.
 
2013-09-10 08:17:33 AM

Nina Haagen Dazs: Freddy Fender? Boots Randolf? Polkas? Nah. I like my horrible music much better.



Shut your mouth. Freddy Fender was awesome.
 
2013-09-10 08:21:12 AM

perigee: I'm against it.

Somewhere along the line, somebody got the idea that music was a disposable commodity with an expiration date. And a preferred origin, for that matter. That's pure marketing nonsense, and all of the arguments that stem from it are pretty much uninformed, or disinformed.

If you can develop an immunity to the small instrumental and stylistic differences, any age or origin of music is valid and fair for consideration. Al Jolson and Cab Calloway are bumptious and joyful, Fats Waller is sly and puckish, and George Formby and Eddie Cantor are pretty hysterical, in a Voh-de-oh-doh kind of way. Middle Eastern Oud music is half-brother to Indian Sitar and Sarangi ragas, and Irish Trad is a direct cousin to American folk.

In short, there's a lot of good stuff out there everywhere and everywhen, if you're open to the experience.

The trick is getting exposure to it. Exposure is what creates the immunity to marketing and vox populi claims of obsolescence, and it's hard to come by. Instead of accepting that children are programmed to enjoy certain old music because somebody gave them a cookie while they were listening to "Freddy and the Dreamers," perhaps it is as simple as they were exposed to music they found enjoyable before they were programmed by society to Not enjoy "that old stuff."

There are plenty of examples of people on this board who rejected their parent's taste in music, which shoots holes in the Pavlovian theory put forth in the article. The lazy insistence that cause-and-effect rules every aspect of human existence strips people of credit for their individual choices, at any age.


One word. Radio. That is the method still that most people around the world are exposed to music. In the commercial radio model, there isn't much money in flogging "oldies" or "gold" music, as that has pretty much reached it's potential market. They survive on commercial sales alone. The teenager enjoying the new freedom of driving often finds that mysterious radio station that suddenly speaks to him, and in the process, George Thorogood.

New releases, no matter which genre, are going to get far more promotion, which means more money from record companies. And yes, radio is still a major factor is bankrolling new artists.

So the radio stations can hit songs harder based not so much on which songs are better, but on which songs are more suitable for a business model. For example, I live in the Lafayette, Louisiana radio market. The 107th biggest market in the US. There are 2 competing country stations, among other formats competing against each other.

But in a market of 400,000 that also gets signals from the Baton Rouge market, is that needed? How can those 2 country stations really be that different? The commercials are the same. The music is the same. The answer is whoever wants to take more money from promotions for playing a new release. It's a business decision. The same with the other formats.

And if it wasn't profitable, they wouldn't be doing it. Guaranteed.
 
2013-09-10 08:31:51 AM
Back in the '80s, I ended up in Boots Randolph's club in Nashville w/ my Dad. It was his pick for the evening's entertainment. Well, we saw Mr. Yakety Sax himself & it wasn't terrible; Dad shook his hand on the way out.
Later on, I rediscovered Western music (not country) & we would spend time listening to Gene Autry, Bob Wills/ Texas Playboys, etc.
Today, I listen to damn near anything non-Pop but still can tell Ernest Tubb from Tex Ritter.
 
2013-09-10 08:39:50 AM
Well, let's see here: Dad liked Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Chet Atkins.

Mom was partial to Glenn Miller, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Rosemary Clooney.

Yep, crap tastes. No wonder I grew up scarred.
 
2013-09-10 08:41:48 AM
No.  No, we don't.

"Lake...  WLAK...  Beautiful music...  in Chicago...."
 
2013-09-10 08:42:29 AM
Speak for yourself subby.

Raised on Pink Floyd, Cat Stevens, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eagles, Linda Ronstadt, Muddy Waters, Clapton etc etc etc.
 
2013-09-10 08:47:04 AM
The 14-year-old of today will be humming "Gagnam Style" at the tricentennial.
 
2013-09-10 08:48:01 AM
My dad was born in '53. For being an uptight navy captain, his music tastes lean acid dropping hippie when it comes to older stuff from the 60's and 70's. He and I have exactly the same tastes in music, especially female vocalists.

The only place we differ is that I have a soft spot in my heart for bluegrass while my father can't stand it.

My mother on the other hand listens exclusively to Irish Tenors, Celtic Thunder, Celtic Women, and she went through a Gordon Lightfoot phase. All I can say is I am glad the Edmund Fitzgerald sunk after enough 8 hour car rides to Santa Rosa.
 
2013-09-10 08:56:38 AM
I liked a lot of my parents' music, except for my dad's dreadful country western and my mom's opera. But I liked the 60's rock, and I stole my dad's Beatles and Who albums and my stepdad's Pink Floyd, Blondie and Kate Bush albums.
 
2013-09-10 08:59:16 AM
My parents were big fans of 50s-70s country and rock & roll. Some of it I still like very much (Carl Perkins, Roy Orbison, Johnny Horton, Jerry Reed for instance) and some of it I'm not crazy about.

But I also made my parents fans of some blues and rock stuff I listened to when I was a teenager (Clapton, Floyd, Dire Straits, Robert Palmer, SRV, and most blues stuff I listened to.) so it worked both ways.

These days I listen to a lot of jazz and oddball rock stuff.
 
2013-09-10 09:05:42 AM
lh3.googleusercontent.com
Thanks, Dad!

/no, really......Thanks!!
 
2013-09-10 09:16:39 AM
No, I don't have the same tastes as my dad. He was an organ player, and he was a big Led Zeppelin fan before I was born. He also grew up in the age of disco, so he really likes to dance (poorly). Since I've been alive his tastes have changed to popular radio crap. For the longest time, I couldn't really figure out what made him like the particular groups he does. In the last ten years or so, I finally determined that he likes music that is made by a group that has a blond-haired chick in it that he wants to fark. In the 80's, he liked Madonna, who he wanted to fark. Remember that one-hit wonder Roxette? Yeah, he liked them cause he wanted to fark the chick in it. Later, it was Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. Then on to Black Eyed Peas and Fergie. If the band doesn't have a blond chick in it that he wants to fark, then he doesn't like their music.

When I go to his house, I bring my ipod so I don't have to listen to that crap.
 
2013-09-10 09:17:14 AM
Gordon Lightfoot
Emmylou Harris
Paul Simon
Doors
Eagles
Beatles
Seals and Crofts

Stuff like that. I think my parents were members of some tape/record club for awhile and that was the kind of stuff we had.
 
2013-09-10 09:18:19 AM

OldManDownDRoad: Well, let's see here: Dad liked Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Chet Atkins.

Mom was partial to Glenn Miller, Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra, Rosemary Clooney.

Yep, crap tastes. No wonder I grew up scarred.



I like your parents.
 
2013-09-10 09:21:28 AM

Bedurndurn: The thing that most confuses me about my parents is how the music they listen to is frozen in stone. Dad listens to one radio station (Rock 102) that near as I can tell has played the exact same 100 or so songs every single day since around 1985 or so. I'm pretty sure the poor man has heard shiat like Fly Like An Eagle and Life in the Fast Lane literally ten thousand times.

I get that you like what was around when you were young, but holy shiat that's like 15-20 years of music. You deserve more than 100 songs.




I remember being puzzled by this when I would listen to classic rock stations. What I decided was that the reason they never play some of the more obscure songs by these artists is that it would defeat the entire reason for the stations existence. This is music as a security blanket; to perform that function, all of the songs have to be ones the listeners know by heart. A less popular Pink Floyd or Yes song would be disturbingly unfamiliar. An old unknown song is really just as bad as a new unknown song. The people choosing to listen to these stations don't want novelty. The concept of a top 40 of classic rock songs is a strange one. The Bob stations around the country are just about as bad. Sure, every now and then they'll throw in a song by The Cure, or New Order, but it's always Blue Monday, or Like An Angel.
 
2013-09-10 09:27:10 AM

cameroncrazy1984: My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.


Maybe he was singing the original rather than Tesla's cover? It probably depends on how old your father is.
 
2013-09-10 09:28:55 AM

endmile: No, I don't have the same tastes as my dad. He was an organ player, and he was a big Led Zeppelin fan before I was born. He also grew up in the age of disco, so he really likes to dance (poorly). Since I've been alive his tastes have changed to popular radio crap. For the longest time, I couldn't really figure out what made him like the particular groups he does. In the last ten years or so, I finally determined that he likes music that is made by a group that has a blond-haired chick in it that he wants to fark. In the 80's, he liked Madonna, who he wanted to fark. Remember that one-hit wonder Roxette? Yeah, he liked them cause he wanted to fark the chick in it. Later, it was Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. Then on to Black Eyed Peas and Fergie. If the band doesn't have a blond chick in it that he wants to fark, then he doesn't like their music.

When I go to his house, I bring my ipod so I don't have to listen to that crap.


You misspelled "four-number-one US hits wonder Roxette"
 
2013-09-10 09:30:43 AM

Harry_Seldon: My mother had great taste in music. I like Neil Diamond, The Carpenters, etc.


I chuckled. My mother as well. Her younger sister liked some cool stuff though. My aunt gave me an old copy of The Dark Side of the Moon in 1981, and I'll be forever grateful.
 
2013-09-10 09:30:47 AM
My Dad raised me on the Clash, Pretenders, and Joe Jackson, and bought me tickets for Sigur Ros/The National/Dismemberment Plan (yay!)/etc this weekend.  We're 110% cool.

I still hate my Mom's taste in music, which ranges from Rod Stewart to Christmas Tunes.  We could agree on the oldies station, but they've started working in the worst of the 80s into their rotation.
 
2013-09-10 09:31:19 AM
I'm an older Farker -- born in mid60s.
My dad liked 50s/60s folk like the Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul & Mary sprinkled with a little Johnny Cash. My Mom basically had no music preference -- a few 50s singles that were around the house -- mostly novelty stuff like Rock Around the Clock, Tie Me Kangaroo Down Sport, Purple People Eater.  In the 90s, for some reason she got onto a Helen Reddy kick.  That was horrifying.
Only thing I remember them listening to on the radio was Prairie Home Companion and talk radio.

When all is said and done, I don't mind an occasional hit of Kingston Trio or Johnny Cash.... and I know all the words to "Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport."
 
2013-09-10 09:32:36 AM

skinink: I love my horrible taste in music. Lisa Lisa, the Cover Girls, T'Pau, Cathy Denis.


www.startrek.com

She's a musician? I knew Spock played the lute, but not her...
 
2013-09-10 09:49:29 AM
My step-dad liked the beatles, rolling stones, pink floyd, jethro tull, king crimson, elp, santana, mott the hoople, david bowie, queen, allman brothers, eric clapton, alan parsons project, genesis, mamas and the papas, blood sweat and tears, frank zappa, led zeppelin, fleeteood mac, joni mitchell, james gang, deep purple, black sabbath, phoebe snow, captain beefheart, chicago, iron butterfly, elo, cream, jimmy hendrix, yardbirds, moody blues, miles davis, talking heads, blondie, joan jett, aerosmith, linda ronstadt, abba, zz top ...

And lots more if I were to search my memory more. Those were his main interests. :)

I do still love a lot of that stuff, especially the deep purple, black sabbath, santana, miles davis, queen, david bowie, and all the prog rock like yes, king crimson, elp and jethro tull. That sort of thing.

For years I went off the deep end into prog rock and jazz fusion and anything in the deep purple / whitesnake / rainbow family tree. Then into lots of neo prog and then into modern britpop. Recently lots of k-pop.

But my main love in the last two years has been salsa and bachata artists, timba, and some cuban music of other sorts. Ray Barretto, oscar d'leon, celia cruz, grupo niche, orquesta guayacan, bobby valentin, hector lavoe, willie colon, pupy, charanga habanera, aventura, bachata heightz, toby love, marc anthony, xtreme (different group), monchy y alexandra, carlos y alejandra, bobby paunetto, calle real, tommy olivencia, willie bobo, sonora carruseles, eddie palmieri, gran combo, orlando pabellon ... and the list goes on.

I really think he would have liked a fair bit of it (not to mention all the modern prog and prog metal I didnt mention) if he were still alive.

So yeah, my stepdad's musical tastes were a bedrock and springboard for me. I still love a lot of it.
 
2013-09-10 09:50:33 AM
You never forget what was playing when you enjoyed your first kiss.

I'm pretty sure it was Marilyn Manson.
 
2013-09-10 09:52:43 AM

Sgygus: Deep down we are all imprinted with the music we hear from age 10 to age 17.


This and BTW subby, when my dad listens to Led Zepp, the Beatles and the Stones, how is this "horrible"?
 
2013-09-10 09:54:21 AM

KinetiKiteniK: I was raised in a moderately strict Lutheran household and music wasn't my parents thing. The only time I'd hear music was a mixture of Glenn Campbell and church hymns. I'm glad I found Slayer and Metallica in 1985.


fc06.deviantart.net

/oblig
 
2013-09-10 09:54:42 AM
This is why I'm Yacht Rocking every weekend.
 
2013-09-10 09:55:36 AM
Crap. Forgot to mention my stepdad was into the pretenders, dire straits, the clash, grand funk railroad, credence clearwater, eurythmics, ... No. This way lies madness. He was into so many cool artists. :)
 
2013-09-10 09:56:13 AM
My Mom is a big Weird Al fan, going back to Another One Rides the Bus.

I never had a chance of a normal life.
 
2013-09-10 09:59:06 AM

LewDux: endmile: No, I don't have the same tastes as my dad. He was an organ player, and he was a big Led Zeppelin fan before I was born. He also grew up in the age of disco, so he really likes to dance (poorly). Since I've been alive his tastes have changed to popular radio crap. For the longest time, I couldn't really figure out what made him like the particular groups he does. In the last ten years or so, I finally determined that he likes music that is made by a group that has a blond-haired chick in it that he wants to fark. In the 80's, he liked Madonna, who he wanted to fark. Remember that one-hit wonder Roxette? Yeah, he liked them cause he wanted to fark the chick in it. Later, it was Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. Then on to Black Eyed Peas and Fergie. If the band doesn't have a blond chick in it that he wants to fark, then he doesn't like their music.

When I go to his house, I bring my ipod so I don't have to listen to that crap.

You misspelled "four-number-one US hits wonder Roxette"


Yeah, their music has really stood the test of time, hasn't it? Honestly, the only reason I remember this band is because of my dad. Otherwise, I probably would say, "who?"
 
2013-09-10 10:06:35 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: My Dad raised me on the Clash, Pretenders, and Joe Jackson


Your dad has great taste in music. All of that stuff is awesome.
 
2013-09-10 10:30:56 AM
With all the show tunes I heard growing up, I'm somewhat surprised my parents were heterosexuals.

/it was a different time.
 
2013-09-10 11:34:07 AM
If out of the entire history of people making music they found to be pleasant and worth while you decide to not listen to or attempt to appreciate music because your parents liked it, then I hope you can summon all that emotion on yearbook picture taking day.
 
2013-09-10 11:34:51 AM
I hated everything about my parents music growing up because I was one of those "No one understand my pain but Ian McKaye, mannnnnnnnn" kinda doucher kids.     Now that I've gotten over myself, I like to go back listen to their music and I like individually dissecting the tracks and hooks.   A carefully crafted pop song where the sum is more that the total of it's parts can be a fascinating thing.
 
2013-09-10 11:52:23 AM

Zizzowop: I hardly think so. My Mom use to listen to Neil Diamond, which isn't that bad I guess, but she also use to listen to John Michael Talbot. My parents are much older than I am, my Dad being 40 when I was born, so the music he likes is very different. His taste is quite odd too, the theme from the movie Flashdance being one of his favorites, yeah, I know, WTF right?



We must be related.
 
2013-09-10 12:02:39 PM
Not entirely true....

BURN IN HELL, RED SOVINE!!!
photo.sing365.com
 
2013-09-10 12:27:30 PM
My parents.. overall, the country stuff I still don't care for..

But overall, I listen to just about anything aside (c)rap and hiphop as it's nothing but mostly whining, enough to be country songs sound uplifting or so repetitive that it's like a broken record or are completely interchangeable.

My kids, listen to just about anything also... so we have a single collection that we all share.


/listening to Elvis this morning...
 
2013-09-10 12:35:30 PM

Sgygus: Deep down we are all imprinted with the music we hear from age 10 to age 17.


Eh, I don't know about that. 10-17 year old me would've hated jazz, alt-country, rockabilly, folk, and a lot of stuff I listen to regularly now.

Back in my youth it was pretty much hard rock, heavy metal, or nothing. Nowadays I actually enjoy The Prairie Home Companion, and my Larry Coryell station is my most-used on Pandora. I still enjoy metal quite a bit, but it's gotta be something somewhat obscure or interesting to rock my boat.

/Also I loathe most of my wife's favorite artists. Especially all the 90s stuff she likes.
 
2013-09-10 01:03:46 PM
There was a lot of good music my parent's listened to when I was growing up.  They really liked

- Simon and Garfunkel (not my usual fare, but I really do like it on occasion)
- Johnny Cash
- Merle Haggard
- Willie Nelson
- Hank Williams Sr (not Jr)
-Jim Croce (on selected occasions)
- Fleetwood Mac (hit or miss, but I really like some of their stuff)
- Elvis
- Beatles
- The Eagles (by far their best music, still love it today)

Generally speaking, they didn't go for anything harder, but pretty good stuff, especially on the "old" country side.  Once they got into "new" country they lost me.  Hank Williams Jr. is the worst offender, IMHO.

I was able to return the favor to them, after a fashion.  They really like Tom Petty and Johnny Cash's American Recordings and when I was a teenager, got them into Genesis/Phil Collins, Huey Lewis (when I was a fan), Blondie and even an appreciation for U2 later.
 
2013-09-10 01:05:09 PM

PainfulItching: Wait. Johnny Cash is only mentioned twice on this page? It's the only thing my grandfather, father, and I really agreed about. Well that and Hank Williams. Senior. Junior tries too hard.


This.
 
2013-09-10 02:06:02 PM

dv-ous: I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.

I I I I I I I I think think think think you've you've you've you've you've gotta be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be be pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling pulling my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my my leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg leg.


I LOL'ed.

/and then put the Philip Glass back on
 
2013-09-10 02:17:26 PM

cherryl taggart: My children are doomed.  Dad is playing 70-80's heavy metal on constant rotation in his car, and I swing from Neil Diamond to Hank Jr. and Merle Haggard, with some Alice Cooper thrown in, in mine.

BWAHAHAHAHAHA!


I'm looking forward to corrupting my niece & nephew. My sister and her husband have *ok* taste in contemporary music, and I have to give them props for the huge amount of classical, but they ignore a lot of really good, more modern stuff. Except Coldplay for some friggin' reason.

enderthexenocide: my dad is weird.  he doesn't really listen to music.  he doesn't own any music of his own and he's never once expressed liking a particular band or singer.  he just turns on classic rock radio stations and refers to it as "background noise."  he doesn't actually listen to it or pay any attention to it.  he's the only person i think i've ever known who really has no interest in music.


By any chance, is he tone-deaf? I've noticed that people who can't really distinguish notes and how they change tend not to care much about music and/or listen to really bad stuff. We all know those people who can't carry a tune worth a damn.
 
2013-09-10 02:20:32 PM
Having deaf parents, I must be the exception that proves the rule. I'll give anything a chance, but modern country and polka.
 
2013-09-10 02:32:29 PM
RyansPrivates:
- The Eagles (by far their best music, still love it today)


i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-10 02:34:13 PM

RobSeace: skinink: I love my horrible taste in music. Lisa Lisa, the Cover Girls, T'Pau, Cathy Denis.

[www.startrek.com image 320x240]

She's a musician? I knew Spock played the lute, but not her...


i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-10 02:40:15 PM
I love my parents' taste in music, as it's what shaped mine.  They were born in 1949, so their formative years were the 1950s and 60s.  As such, what some people would called "oldies" music is what I love listening to the most, followed by bands like Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Who, The Rolling Stones and such, that my dad really got into in the 70s.  I do like some contemporary or modern artists, but I'd really rather listen to that.

Also, my dad developed a fondness for the stuff HIS parents listened to when he was a kid, and because of that, I've got more than a Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, and Rosemary Clooney albums.  Great stuff.
 
2013-09-10 03:22:52 PM
Mom's music? Anne Murray, Cher, Seals & Crofts: no, no, no, no.

My father tended to listen to oldies stations back in the 1970s, so his music was largely mid-50s rock & roll (soundtrack for his hellraising years). That and a bunch of Hank Williams, Sr. 45s & compilation albums; when I was a kid & asked why he liked Hank, he told me it was his "feeling blue" music. Now it's part of my "feeling blue" music.

Me? All over the place, but mostly 80s post-punk (soundtrack for my hellraising years).
 
2013-09-10 04:19:11 PM

alcoda: Having deaf parents, I must be the exception that proves the rule. I'll give anything a chance, but modern country and polka.


The Barry Boyce Band is one of the only local acts I can stand, and they play polka.

/Look forward to Oktoberfest each year because of ol' Barry.
 
2013-09-10 05:33:39 PM
Dad was a jazz hound from his early teens, frequenting after hours joints to hear the likes of Louis Jordan, Charlie Parker, Count Basie. I took him to see 'The Last of the Blue Devils' , which I recommend to any jazz lover. It is a documentary of the Kansas City jazz scene of the '30s , cool beyond anything we have had in the subsequent 80 years, and he just kept saying, "I saw him" over and over. Thanks Pop, for pointing me in the proper direction.
 
2013-09-10 06:00:04 PM

tbriggs: Dad was a jazz hound from his early teens, frequenting after hours joints to hear the likes of Louis Jordan, Charlie Parker, Count Basie. I took him to see 'The Last of the Blue Devils' , which I recommend to any jazz lover. It is a documentary of the Kansas City jazz scene of the '30s , cool beyond anything we have had in the subsequent 80 years, and he just kept saying, "I saw him" over and over. Thanks Pop, for pointing me in the proper direction.


Hipster
 
2013-09-10 06:28:39 PM

endmile: No, I don't have the same tastes as my dad. He was an organ player, and he was a big Led Zeppelin fan before I was born. He also grew up in the age of disco, so he really likes to dance (poorly). Since I've been alive his tastes have changed to popular radio crap. For the longest time, I couldn't really figure out what made him like the particular groups he does. In the last ten years or so, I finally determined that he likes music that is made by a group that has a blond-haired chick in it that he wants to fark. In the 80's, he liked Madonna, who he wanted to fark. Remember that one-hit wonder Roxette? Yeah, he liked them cause he wanted to fark the chick in it. Later, it was Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. Then on to Black Eyed Peas and Fergie. If the band doesn't have a blond chick in it that he wants to fark, then he doesn't like their music.

When I go to his house, I bring my ipod so I don't have to listen to that crap.


Your dad is going to love Samantha Fish.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9QxChq4pdk
 
2013-09-10 06:55:56 PM

PainfulItching: One word. Radio.


Two words. No thanks.
 
2013-09-10 07:08:37 PM

LewDux: tbriggs: Dad was a jazz hound from his early teens, frequenting after hours joints to hear the likes of Louis Jordan, Charlie Parker, Count Basie. I took him to see 'The Last of the Blue Devils' , which I recommend to any jazz lover. It is a documentary of the Kansas City jazz scene of the '30s , cool beyond anything we have had in the subsequent 80 years, and he just kept saying, "I saw him" over and over. Thanks Pop, for pointing me in the proper direction.

Hipster


Age 57, I think not.  This was the early '80s . There was a larval-hipster in the seat in front of us who was proudly identifying the musicians, never having heard them live.

--only 2 professional musicians  among my siblings
 
2013-09-10 08:22:41 PM
I certainly am not a fan of 1950's b-bop music.

Although both my kids have Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin on their iPods.
 
2013-09-10 09:57:07 PM
Sgygus: Deep down we are all imprinted with the music we hear from age 10 to age 17.

Verbaltoxin:Eh, I don't know about that.

I don't eitherexactly. As a music lover, my horizons have expanded.  But I do think most persons with a casual interest in music seem to be largely stuck with the music of their teenage years.
 
2013-09-10 10:46:35 PM
I grew up listening to "16 Tons" and "Little Boxes" so, yeah, my parents had *weird* taste in music. When my mom wasn't listening to old-school hyper-twang country (as an Italian Bostonian!), she was listening to "O Solo Mio" and "Oh My Papa".

I can still handle some of the stuff, but not country music of whatever era or form. Just cannot tolerate it.

My kid grew up listening to 80's New Wave and Weird Al, which is what we liked, and it was hysterical when we moved on to stuff like NIN and Nirvana when she was in her N'Sync and Backstreet Boys phase and she used to come stomping out of her room and yell at us to "Turn that NOISE down!"

But she eventually turned to the good 80's and 90's stuff, and went back to explore the 70's metal music, too. We all survived and have our own tastes now, so it's all good.
 
2013-09-10 11:03:22 PM
Yes BS! I mean I dislike the old time country and western music my parents listened less than I dislike C&W since then, but only in the fashion death by firing squad is probably better than death by lynching.
 
2013-09-11 04:17:31 AM

perigee: Instead of accepting that children are programmed to enjoy certain old music because somebody gave them a cookie while they were listening to "Freddy and the Dreamers," perhaps it is as simple as they were exposed to music they found enjoyable before they were programmed by society to Not enjoy "that old stuff."


Maybe it has nothing to do with that. My dad even admits that music got better after he grew up. More complex, better songwriting, better playing. Once you taste a fine wine, you don't want the three dollar stuff.
 
2013-09-11 04:23:27 AM

cameroncrazy1984: My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.


Cool song, but Tesla didn't write it, it was originally done by the Five Man Electrical Band.
 
2013-09-11 04:50:23 AM

Abacus9: cameroncrazy1984: My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.

Cool song, but Tesla didn't write it, it was originally done by the Five Man Electrical Band.


Five Man Acoustical Band. It was Tesla's live album.

Kids these days...
 
2013-09-11 06:07:41 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Abacus9: cameroncrazy1984: My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.

Cool song, but Tesla didn't write it, it was originally done by the Five Man Electrical Band.

Five Man Acoustical Band Jam. It was Tesla's live album.

Kids these days...


If you're gonna troll, at least get the album name correct.
 
2013-09-11 06:11:39 AM

Abacus9: AverageAmericanGuy: Abacus9: cameroncrazy1984: My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.

Cool song, but Tesla didn't write it, it was originally done by the Five Man Electrical Band.

Five Man Acoustical Band Jam. It was Tesla's live album.

Kids these days...

If you're gonna troll, at least get the album name correct.


No, I'm pretty sure it's Five Man Acoustical Band. It's a play on the actual band named Five Man Electric Band.
 
2013-09-11 06:18:51 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Abacus9: AverageAmericanGuy: Abacus9: cameroncrazy1984: My dad used to randomly sing the chorus to Tesla's "Signs" when I was little. He would never tell us what it was. Took us years before we figured it out.

Cool song, but Tesla didn't write it, it was originally done by the Five Man Electrical Band.

Five Man Acoustical Band Jam. It was Tesla's live album.

Kids these days...

If you're gonna troll, at least get the album name correct.

No, I'm pretty sure it's Five Man Acoustical Band. It's a play on the actual band named Five Man Electric Band.


I'll be back in a bit to see if you two got this worked out yet.  Let me know if you need any help.
 
2013-09-11 06:56:26 AM

Soup_In_A_Basket: [lh3.googleusercontent.com image 207x207]
Thanks, Dad!

/no, really......Thanks!!


I remember being a little kid, 3 or 4, and just staring at that cover.  Didn't really know why at the time... I just really liked it!
 
2013-09-11 08:51:57 AM
My mom had the better music tastes - she has pretty much every Beatles and Zeppelin album released in the US.  I'll forgive her for Elvis though.

My dad, who grew up the same time as my mom - no clue.  He had to ask me who was playing on the TV one day.  It was Zeppelin playing "Stairway to Heaven".
 
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