If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Opposing Views)   Law student sues law school for making him retake a law class he failed   (opposingviews.com) divider line 78
    More: Amusing, Jackson Millikan, law schools, California Superior Court  
•       •       •

7681 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Sep 2013 at 3:44 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



78 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-09 02:26:15 PM
So the school required him to re-enroll in the course. Millikan, according to his legal filing, then went home for the summer to Washington state, where he worked for the State Attorney General's office. He says that over the summer he heard nothing more about the demand that he take "Civil Procedure II" a second time. Due to this "silence" on the part of the school, Millikan assumed that the school had simply given up on requiring him to retake the course.

Sounds like he really needed to pass that course.
 
2013-09-09 02:38:32 PM
Allegedly
 
2013-09-09 02:38:40 PM
Apparently the course was on how to avoid filing frivolous lawsuits.
 
2013-09-09 02:39:39 PM
I'm guessing he's figured out that he's wasted a lot of money so he's trying to make it back creatively.
 
2013-09-09 02:58:58 PM
That sounds like an argument that someone who went to the Thomas Jefferson School of Law and Agriculture might make.  I know courts will always let me get away with assuming that silence means that I don't have to file things.
 
2013-09-09 03:21:20 PM

NutWrench: So the school required him to re-enroll in the course. Millikan, according to his legal filing, then went home for the summer to Washington state, where he worked for the State Attorney General's office. He says that over the summer he heard nothing more about the demand that he take "Civil Procedure II" a second time. Due to this "silence" on the part of the school, Millikan assumed that the school had simply given up on requiring him to retake the course.

Sounds like he really needed to pass that course.


I took an incomplete in a 200-level "theory of" class in college, a pre-req for all of the upper-level courses in my major. It didn't stop me from taking those courses (which apparently it should have), so as a graduating senior, I was in the intro class with 200 freshman (and a bunch of jocks). The only way I knew to retake the class was that when I applied for graduation, they informed me that I shouldn't have been allowed to take the degree's worth of upper levels I had taken over the last 18 months.

Dude's an idiot. Credit him for creativity, but he's a moron for thinking this had a prayer of working.
 
2013-09-09 03:35:16 PM
Just when my opinion of law students had seemingly bottomed out, a challenger approaches.
 
2013-09-09 03:44:33 PM
He tried enrolling for the fall semester in a set of classes that he had selected, only to find that the school had automatically re-enrolled him in the required "Civil Procedure II." This disappointed Millikan because, he says in the complaint, "it did not fit the schedule he had already begun to build."

So he dropped the class. The school automatically reenrolled him again, freezing his account in the process so he couldn't change he schedule again.


Yeah, I know how this goes.

 Everybody on campus hates this kid. The registrar hates him for this, the student services people think he's creepy because he's always hitting on them, the career services people bemoan the fact that his resume is in Comic Sans, the financial aid people can't stand him because he filled his FAFSA out in crayon and whines that his refund isn't ready before classes and the academic team wonder how in the hell he got in.

The only people who can stand him is admissions, because he's no longer their problem. They got paid for filling the seat.
 
2013-09-09 03:45:46 PM
maybe law school isn't for him.
 
2013-09-09 03:46:41 PM
I say a lawsuit should be required to be awarded a law degree.
 
2013-09-09 03:47:16 PM
fark sues submitter for not making up a headline to go with the article and instead using the article's headline
 
2013-09-09 03:47:21 PM

ManateeGag: maybe law school isn't for him.


I'm not sure pre-school is for him
 
2013-09-09 03:47:32 PM
The student has become the master.
 
2013-09-09 03:47:44 PM
He should have gotten a GED in law instead.
 
2013-09-09 03:48:24 PM
No one is more delusionally self-assured than a third-year law student.
 
2013-09-09 03:48:25 PM
Ah yes, he believes that he is in the right because the school did not fulfill some (real or imagined) required technicality. Nevermind the fact that he's not competent to be a lawyer.

The school is trying to save you money, bud. Classes don't mean jack when you can't pass the bar exam.
 
2013-09-09 03:48:53 PM
He will make a fine state rep one day. Maybe he could even sue his way into congress.
 
2013-09-09 03:49:30 PM
Is this one of those fly by night scam law schools because California doesn't require an ABA certified JD to sit for the bar exam?
 
2013-09-09 03:50:45 PM
Hey Jackson Millikan, when a potential employer researches you, this is the first thing they'll find:

You got a D in a course and then whined that you had to retake the course. Nice work.
 
2013-09-09 03:50:53 PM
They have a pretty website so it must be legit
 
2013-09-09 03:52:20 PM

what_now: Hey Jackson Millikan, when a potential employer researches you, this is the first thing they'll find:

You got a D in a course and then whined that you had to retake the course. Nice work.


Sounds like he's on the fast track to management.
 
2013-09-09 03:54:27 PM
api.ning.com
 
2013-09-09 03:54:33 PM
BETTER CALL SAUL
 
2013-09-09 03:54:49 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwSKkKrUzUk

Click here, safe for work, assuming you can safely watch youtube videos and surf the net at work.
 
2013-09-09 03:57:20 PM

Dr Dreidel: NutWrench: So the school required him to re-enroll in the course. Millikan, according to his legal filing, then went home for the summer to Washington state, where he worked for the State Attorney General's office. He says that over the summer he heard nothing more about the demand that he take "Civil Procedure II" a second time. Due to this "silence" on the part of the school, Millikan assumed that the school had simply given up on requiring him to retake the course.

Sounds like he really needed to pass that course.

I took an incomplete in a 200-level "theory of" class in college, a pre-req for all of the upper-level courses in my major. It didn't stop me from taking those courses (which apparently it should have), so as a graduating senior, I was in the intro class with 200 freshman (and a bunch of jocks). The only way I knew to retake the class was that when I applied for graduation, they informed me that I shouldn't have been allowed to take the degree's worth of upper levels I had taken over the last 18 months.

Dude's an idiot. Credit him for creativity, but he's a moron for thinking this had a prayer of working.


Florida State actually tried to prevent me from registering for my first year of MBA classes because I hadn't done an exit interview when I received my bachelor's six years previously.  The worker told me I never officially graduated with a BS from FSU.  I pointed out that this was news to me, as I had earned a law degree from another school and been accepted into FSU's MBA program.  I actually had to go two levels above him to get the situation resolved.  CSB.

Bureaucracies are fun.
 
2013-09-09 03:57:24 PM
Couple of questions:

I know for all my undergrad degrees, the required courses had to passed with a "70" or higher; for my grad degree the bar is higher, 75 is the cut-off. Why would he think a "D" was an acceptable grade in a required course?

And why would he think it was the school's responsibility to remind him to retake it? I got a degree plan and had to sign acknowledgement of it; they don't remind me about jack--I don't meet the requirements, too bad. And frankly, that is how it should be in any graduate degree program.....

I hate whiny twats like this guy.
 
2013-09-09 03:57:52 PM

what_now: Hey Jackson Millikan, when a potential employer researches you, this is the first thing they'll find:

You got a D in a course and then whined that you had to retake the course. Nice work.


Last spring, I ended up bombing the last couple of exams in Precalc. Even though I was already registered for Calc I in the fall, I still had to take Precalc over in the summer if I wanted to keep my seat in the class. I retook the course and got a B this time.

It never occurred to me that I could just sue and start the next class in the sequence wholly unprepared. I paid the $800 like a sucker and went and learned something.
 
2013-09-09 03:59:25 PM
Your honor, if they'd been providing a quality legal education, there's no way I'd have been stupid enough to file this suit in the first place, is there?!
 
2013-09-09 04:01:06 PM
what's his farkhandle?

/oblig
 
2013-09-09 04:01:25 PM
That's where you sign up for the class you failed, and the followup class concurrently. Depending on how the course reqs are worded, you can get away with it.

I failed a class that was a prereq for another, requirement said "completed X class". Not completed successfully, not completed with a C, just completed.

I used the line of reasoning that I was in the class, didn't drop it, and stuck through and took the final - hence I had completed the class, just not successfully. Prof bought it and let me in the upper level class. (Passed both that time).

You're a damn lawyer, find the loophole of vague language.
 
2013-09-09 04:03:16 PM

ManateeGag: maybe law school isn't for him.


well, i DNRTFA, but I noticed in an above post quoting the article, that the dude clerked with the DA's office over the summer.  So, since he's the kind of person that would fail Civ Pro and get clerk with the DA, i can say one thing relatively comfortably: he is probably related to somebody that matters.
 
2013-09-09 04:03:58 PM
Why the fark did he only get around to taking Civ. Pro. as a 2L?
 
2013-09-09 04:07:11 PM

ManateeGag: maybe law school isn't for him.


Isn't for him?? I think this proves he has the chops to be an attorney
 
2013-09-09 04:07:20 PM

sprgrss: Why the fark did he only get around to taking Civ. Pro. as a 2L?


Depends on the school's required curriculum.  We didn't get around to it until second year either.  Five classes per semester....

1st semester:
Torts
Contracts
Property
Con Law
Research & Writing

2nd Semester
Evidence
Contracts II
Property II
R & W II
Crim Law
 
2013-09-09 04:09:53 PM

Thingster: That's where you sign up for the class you failed, and the followup class concurrently. Depending on how the course reqs are worded, you can get away with it.

I failed a class that was a prereq for another, requirement said "completed X class". Not completed successfully, not completed with a C, just completed.

I used the line of reasoning that I was in the class, didn't drop it, and stuck through and took the final - hence I had completed the class, just not successfully. Prof bought it and let me in the upper level class. (Passed both that time).

You're a damn lawyer, find the loophole of vague language.


Reasonably clever. Good work.
 
2013-09-09 04:10:19 PM
Isn't there a current glut of lawyers?  And that there is no control on the faucet that's spilling out those legal eagles?  It appears that the door to the law profession is open a little too wide and anyone with a lukewarm IQ can stroll on through.  Just sayin'.

/I know I could be sued for this.
 
2013-09-09 04:12:55 PM
When I was a senior in college, I discovered that due to switching my major a few times, I had actually failed to take enough gen ed classes, and needed to take either a freshman level English or a Lab Science.

This was complicated by the fact that although the graduation application had been available since September, and was actually DUE by mid November, I hadn't gotten around to it until February- after the add/drop period for second semester. The adviser told me I would have to take summer classes unless I could persuade a professor to let me in,

At the time, I was taking a graduate level seminar on Jane Austen (for fun) and I begged the Prof to let me into her "Intro to British Lit" class, by telling her that I had already read 85% of her syllabus and promising a report on anything at all by the end of the week.

Why didn't I just threaten to sue? I totally should have- it was clearly the college's fault for only reminding me 5 times to get my graduation application in on time. The 6th time totally would have fixed the problem.
 
2013-09-09 04:15:35 PM
Of the graduating class of 2011, http://www.lstscorereports.com/?school=thomasjefferson&show=sals">26.7 % were employed and reported a salary.
 
2013-09-09 04:16:37 PM

ProfessorOhki: Your honor, if they'd been providing a quality legal education, there's no way I'd have been stupid enough to file this suit in the first place, is there?!


It just.   Might.   Work!
 
2013-09-09 04:17:10 PM
I will hammer and hammer until...oh wait, you failed?
 
2013-09-09 04:17:51 PM
The school told him he failed and needed to retake the class, so he's suing them for not telling him a second time?

Well that certainly makes sense.
 
2013-09-09 04:18:20 PM
I'm sure that suing a school filled to the brim with lawyers who teach law is a brilliant idea for a 3rd year law student who got D's in class.
 
2013-09-09 04:21:26 PM

BritneysSpeculum: That sounds like an argument that someone who went to the Thomas Jefferson School of Law and Agriculture might make.  I know courts will always let me get away with assuming that silence means that I don't have to file things.


A friend of mine is an attorney in a discrimination lawsuit.

The plaintiff stopped going to work. Four months later she showed up.

"Fired? Nobody came and told me I was fired. You can't do this!"

She also represented herself in court. You can imagine how well such a genius handled that.
 
2013-09-09 04:27:17 PM

you_idiot: I'm sure that suing a school filled to the brim with lawyers who teach law is a brilliant idea for a 3rd year law student who got D's in class.


Seems he learned all the important lessons, except one, and he's about to learn that one.

Lawyering is more often than not the art of passing bullshiat off as 100% lean Award* winning CowPIETM.
 
2013-09-09 04:27:51 PM
Law student frivolous lawsuit to gain an advantage trifecta in play.
 
2013-09-09 04:27:52 PM
zimbomba63:   Isn't there a current glut of lawyers?  And that there is no control on the faucet that's spilling out those legal eagles?  It appears that the door to the law profession is open a little too wide and anyone with a lukewarm IQ can stroll on through.  Just sayin'.

This is California.  At last count, I believe there are well over 50 law schools in this state.  Yes, you did not misread that.  Roughly 20 are accredited.

The bar exam is supposed to the control on the faucet, I guess.
 
2013-09-09 04:31:24 PM
Professor Kingsfield frowns on these shenanigans.
John T. Hart grins uncontrollably:

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-09-09 04:51:07 PM
Technically I'm still a quarter of a PE short of graduating from undergrad because I didn't file the right paperwork each semester to get credit for intercollegiate sports, and since I thought I was getting credit for that I didn't bother signing in for other things. They were kind enough to overlook that, and I didn't even have to file a lawsuit. Not that it ever occurred to me to do so.
 
2013-09-09 04:56:24 PM
The guy should just transfer to Hollywood Upstairs Law School.
 
2013-09-09 04:57:18 PM

SirEattonHogg: zimbomba63:   Isn't there a current glut of lawyers?  And that there is no control on the faucet that's spilling out those legal eagles?  It appears that the door to the law profession is open a little too wide and anyone with a lukewarm IQ can stroll on through.  Just sayin'.

This is California.  At last count, I believe there are well over 50 law schools in this state.  Yes, you did not misread that.  Roughly 20 are accredited.

The bar exam is supposed to the control on the faucet, I guess.


Back when I was in college and my belt was festooned with onions, the accounting department would have grads come in and tell us what real life was like out there.  One speaker was a CPA/tax attorney, so he gave his talk and it was question and answer time, one of the questions concerned the bar exam, how hard was that?  He said, If you could pass the CPA exam, you will have no problem with the bar exam.  This was in Illinois, so I don't know the various degrees of difficulty in the various states' exams, but I think this may be the problem.  The bar exam may need to be made a bit more difficult to pass and standardized for the nation, like the CPA exam.
 
Displayed 50 of 78 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report