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(BBC-US)   The Moon, which did not have water, then did have water, then had ice, now no longer has water   (bbc.com) divider line 35
    More: Sad, moons, Johannes Kepler, Sir Ernest Shackleton, lunar landing, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Planetary Science, lunar regolith, radio telescopes  
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2224 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Sep 2013 at 10:03 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-09 10:03:52 AM  
Spoiler alert:  It's because Althena is dead.
 
2013-09-09 10:07:01 AM  
The aliens drank it all, dammit.
 
2013-09-09 10:07:09 AM  
Double up on the caulking for your Moon condo. Low humidity is hell on houseplants.
 
2013-09-09 10:07:43 AM  
Journalist agenda detected.
 
2013-09-09 10:08:17 AM  
Why don't they just do what their GISS unit does...have Hansen make up the data, and then go out and say that there IS water, and that the scientific debate is already settled.
 
2013-09-09 10:10:36 AM  
Just attach rocket engines to a glacier and fire it up there. Blammo, all the water you need.

Why do I have to think of everything?
 
2013-09-09 10:15:40 AM  
There is, obviously, milk.

i309.photobucket.com

Drink your moonmilk and shut up.
 
2013-09-09 10:20:30 AM  
Now what will I mix with my moon whiskey?
 
2013-09-09 10:20:39 AM  
There was a Lunar Whale so there has to have been water at some point.
 
2013-09-09 10:21:00 AM  
The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.
 
2013-09-09 10:23:38 AM  
Profile photo of BBS science writer:

img2u.info
 
2013-09-09 10:32:53 AM  

doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.


Damn those engineers and their attachment to practical, achievable reality eh? Stupid Luddites with their book larnin'.

They should listen to you instead and buy a 3D printer and start printing that warp drive, eh?

/Most of the space bilge you spew is nothing but dreams.
 
2013-09-09 10:36:06 AM  
Here's a thought: why don't we go there and use a glorified icecream scoop to put this stuff in a bucket, then try to melt it and see if was "ice".

We could sit around here and argue about wavelengths and remote controller sensors for the next three decades, but that won't answer any questions.
 
2013-09-09 10:36:35 AM  

gnosis301: Spoiler alert:  It's because Althena is dead.


That is a reference that I did not expect.

/Played the original SegaCD game.
//And the original SegaCD sequel.
 
2013-09-09 10:55:44 AM  
There's still cheese, though, right?
 
2013-09-09 11:05:26 AM  

doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.


In the whole of human history, human beings have spent a grand total of about 3 1/2 days on the surface of the moon.  Combined, the four Mars rovers have spent almost two decades on the surface of Mars.  They've collected far more data for far less money than any non-permanent human mission could ever hope for.  We'll get people back up there eventually, but it's kind of worthless to propose manned missions to Mars until we're ready to settle there permanently.  If we want to know for sure if there's water on the moon, it's better to send probes there than people.
 
2013-09-09 11:10:24 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.

Damn those engineers and their attachment to practical, achievable reality eh? Stupid Luddites with their book larnin'.

They should listen to you instead and buy a 3D printer and start printing that warp drive, eh?

/Most of the space bilge you spew is nothing but dreams.


Nah, the just use 3d printers to make impromptu tools to do repairs.
 
2013-09-09 11:23:42 AM  
FTA: The US space agency Nasa sells crushes dreams.

Unless you consider "Nothing but dead planets out there. God made all this for us alone to exploit" particularly positive.
 
2013-09-09 11:44:29 AM  
t2.gstatic.com
 
2013-09-09 11:46:16 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: Quantum Apostrophe: doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.

Damn those engineers and their attachment to practical, achievable reality eh? Stupid Luddites with their book larnin'.

They should listen to you instead and buy a 3D printer and start printing that warp drive, eh?

/Most of the space bilge you spew is nothing but dreams.

Nah, the just use 3d printers to make impromptu tools to do repairs.


Lies! Everyone knows that 3D printers are only useless toys and will never, ever, ever have practical applications. Now where is my magic immortality potion?
 
2013-09-09 11:48:15 AM  
It isn't that the moon doesn't have water ice, the moon has been proven to be less dry than we thought but the problem is that there don't appear to be significant amounts of water ice on the moon. Which is what you need for a moon base. All of which has been pretty well known since 2011 or so. Eh.

As for having a moonbase, its a nice idea but the engineering challenges are enormous. We understand the moon a lot better than we did in 1969-1972, but we don't understand the engineering capabilities needed to live/work on the moon even in short stays. That doesn't mean we shouldn't go back though, it would be crazy for us to not go back. Its there in the sky and the nearest celestial body to our planet.
 
2013-09-09 11:58:10 AM  

way south: Here's a thought: why don't we go there and use a glorified icecream scoop to put this stuff in a bucket, then try to melt it and see if was "ice".

We could sit around here and argue about wavelengths and remote controller sensors for the next three decades, but that won't answer any questions.


but that's madness, the moon is far too far away to comtemplate ever reaching it, much less bringing anything back!

?watched a moon shot take off from Wallops Island last Sat night
 
2013-09-09 12:05:05 PM  
farking hate this headline meme... "geez why won't science just make up it's mind and stick to it?!?!"
 
2013-09-09 12:19:49 PM  
On a clear day, you can even see Lake Armstrong.
 
2013-09-09 12:39:28 PM  
Shut up, shiatbag.

No, seriously. STFU.
 
2013-09-09 12:41:04 PM  

Mega Steve: Tyrone Slothrop: Quantum Apostrophe: doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.

Damn those engineers and their attachment to practical, achievable reality eh? Stupid Luddites with their book larnin'.

They should listen to you instead and buy a 3D printer and start printing that warp drive, eh?

/Most of the space bilge you spew is nothing but dreams.

Nah, the just use 3d printers to make impromptu tools to do repairs.

Lies! Everyone knows that 3D printers are only useless toys and will never, ever, ever have practical applications. Now where is my magic immortality potion?


Luddite!  I mean, I'm the Luddite!  Wait, who is the Luddite in this scenario
 
2013-09-09 12:57:25 PM  

AngryDragon: Journalist agenda detected.


Yup.  Amazingly enough, the author mentions the LRO, but fails to mention or refute the findings of the accompanying LCROSS mission-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCROSS#Results
 
2013-09-09 01:02:17 PM  
"We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too."

Yeah, dead dreams.

/love space
//studied astrophysics in college
///want off this ball of rock
////still stuck in my cube
 
2013-09-09 01:03:43 PM  

rugman11: doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.

In the whole of human history, human beings have spent a grand total of about 3 1/2 days on the surface of the moon.  Combined, the four Mars rovers have spent almost two decades on the surface of Mars.  They've collected far more data for far less money than any non-permanent human mission could ever hope for.  We'll get people back up there eventually, but it's kind of worthless to propose manned missions to Mars until we're ready to settle there permanently.  If we want to know for sure if there's water on the moon, it's better to send probes there than people.



You know... I wonder why we don't send a robotic rover up to the moon to settle the issue once and for all. It would be a lot easier to land one on the moon than it would be to land one on Mars. So much closer to us, lower gravity, no atmosphere...

If there IS significant quantities of water it would certainly make a convenient jumping off point to the rest of the solar syatem.

Water or not I think we should have a permenant outpost on the moon at some point. I'm sure there's plenty of science we could do up there at least. I don't know about thin-skinned surface habitats, but I hear that closing off a lunar cave and building the habitat in a long-extinct lava tube underground might be a good way to go. Radiation and micrometeorite shielding built in...
 
2013-09-09 01:35:53 PM  
Water on the Moon is not as important as having hydrates.

A hydrate is stable at higher temps in a hard vacuum and is therefore easier to deal with.

And if you need the water, just heat it up.

Many NEOs are showing up with hydrates in the regolith, much of which could be created in a solar wind interaction.
 
2013-09-09 03:44:48 PM  
"Why we might not be able to live on the Moonread the article"
 
2013-09-09 05:46:04 PM  
There go my plans for raising chickens on the Moon. Moon-chickens, I was gonna call them. But now...(sigh)
 
2013-09-09 10:00:26 PM  
Great, let's dump all our nuclear waste there. Also all of our beige, bell-bottomed jumpsuits.
i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-10 12:23:12 AM  

rugman11: doglover: The US space agency Nasa sells dreams.

No they don't. They try to, but then the budget gets cut and those dreams die a slow, pathetic death as they try to spin obvious backup plans, such as robotic missions, as preferable to humans setting foot on other planets.

In the whole of human history, human beings have spent a grand total of about 3 1/2 days on the surface of the moon.  Combined, the four Mars rovers have spent almost two decades on the surface of Mars.  They've collected far more data for far less money than any non-permanent human mission could ever hope for.  We'll get people back up there eventually, but it's kind of worthless to propose manned missions to Mars until we're ready to settle there permanently.  If we want to know for sure if there's water on the moon, it's better to send probes there than people.


Information on what?

All we've got is rocks. And we keep aiming the robots at sandboxes, not likely biological sites. Screw astrogeology. Boots on the ground is where it's at. Humans don't need information on Mars. We need the ability to abandon ship if Earth gets weird. We'll have all the time in the world and all the resources to do it with if we could just survive space travel.
 
2013-09-10 12:12:13 PM  

gnosis301: Spoiler alert:  It's because Althena is dead.


But it was proven that her intervention was not needed!

Even GHALLEON ultimately believed in the power of humanity!

/Seriously those games were great.
//I admit I only got to play the PSx Remakes.
 
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