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(Fox News)   Justice Department to declassify court orders regarding government surveillance. Or people could just log on to WikiLeaks   (foxnews.com ) divider line
    More: Followup, Justice Department, Northern District of California, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, Urban League, court orders, declassification  
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574 clicks; posted to Politics » on 08 Sep 2013 at 10:27 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-08 10:43:33 AM  
Secret courts, mass surveillance. If they start putting on show trials, I'm really gonna start getting worried.

/it's too early for this shiat
//I need an advi
///and vodka
 
2013-09-08 10:47:22 AM  
The release of the records is in response to an order issued by a federal judge in California. In its filing, the Justice Department said it was "broadly construing" that order and is declassifying a larger set of documents than the ruling required.

I'm sure someone will be along shortly to tell us all why we need to be outraged.
 
2013-09-08 10:58:17 AM  

Infernalist: The release of the records is in response to an order issued by a federal judge in California. In its filing, the Justice Department said it was "broadly construing" that order and is declassifying a larger set of documents than the ruling required.

I'm sure someone will be along shortly to tell us all why we need to be outraged.


This is somehow part of 0blamer and Holder's plan to confuse the really paranoid and stupid.
 
2013-09-08 11:03:55 AM  

Infernalist: I'm sure someone will be along shortly to tell us all why we need to be outraged.


FTA: The Justice Department is declassifying portions of some secret court orders concerning the government's authority to seize records under the Patriot Act.

/ nothing to see here. move along, citizens
 
2013-09-08 11:18:13 AM  
I am sure this will fix everything.
 
2013-09-08 11:26:04 AM  
The government reminds it's employees all the time that even though information may be in the public arena it may still be classified so this is how they fix it.

Only the government would think publicly available information is a secret.
 
2013-09-08 11:30:38 AM  
Secret Courts always end well.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-08 12:20:27 PM  
IMO the Snowden fiasco points out just how screwed up our "security" has become. pre 9/11 we had too much data spread over too many competing agencies, result no one really knew anything. post 9/11 we have massively more data semi concentrated by lumping all the agencies together under a new one, no real ability to interpret it and a bureaucracy run amok. combine that with a work load that requires contractors and you have the clusterfark that is today's version of security theater.

also i'm guessing here but i'd bet that the more "secret, top secret, eyes only" stuff you have in your little fiefdom the more important it is perceived to be. hence the reclassify of open stuff as secret again.

USA USA USA
 
2013-09-08 12:25:01 PM  

edmo: The government reminds it's employees all the time that even though information may be in the public arena it may still be classified so this is how they fix it.

Only the government would think publicly available information is a secret.


It really depends upon what the information is. Lets say for instance you work for a bank, someone hacks into your bank and publishes peoples personal bank information. You as an employee may already have access to that information on a case by case basis, but working as a teller just as you shouldn't go into the data on your companies computers and peak at it, you also shouldn't go home and download this hacked info and peak at it, its part of the integrity of your job. That said, you might be tempted to peak at publicly posting memos that talk about the future direction of your company, etc. But even that may be risky if you accidentally reveal you know this information your not supposed to know.
 
2013-09-08 12:29:46 PM  

Doktor_Zhivago: Secret Courts always end well.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 219x300]


Iron Felix.  Professional paranoid and sadist.
 
2013-09-08 01:02:22 PM  
 the DOD letter i get usually includes:
Classified information, whether or not already posted on public websites, disclosed to the media, or otherwise in the public domain remains classified and must be treated as such until it is declassified by an appropriate U.S. government authority. It is the responsibility of every DoD employee and contractor to protect classified information and to follow established procedures for accessing classified information only through authorized means.
 
2013-09-08 01:30:21 PM  
You know as well as I do that the public has little to no interest in the truth, documentation, or anything of the sort.
 
2013-09-08 02:35:46 PM  
The government says it will provide hundreds of pages of documents to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an Internet civil liberties group that had filed a lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act.

Wow, "hundreds of pages." Didn't Snowden leak 10s of thousands?

Pretty pathetic, Obama.
 
2013-09-08 02:36:17 PM  
Can't log into wikileaks if you work for the NSA.

So, it's useful for those guys, I guess.
 
2013-09-08 03:04:01 PM  

sendtodave: Can't log into wikileaks if you work for the NSA.

So, it's useful for those guys, I guess.



Sure you can.  They US gov just don't want one to, and most people clutch too tightly to the government teat to think for themselves when they're on the gravy train.
 
2013-09-08 03:17:18 PM  

BafflerMeal: sendtodave: Can't log into wikileaks if you work for the NSA.

So, it's useful for those guys, I guess.


Sure you can.  They US gov just don't want one to, and most people clutch too tightly to the government teat to think for themselves when they're on the gravy train.


Viewing classified documents can get your clearance yanked, or worse.

Even If they're public.

Asinine, isn't it?
 
2013-09-08 04:42:37 PM  
If you really wanted to a trash a suspect, just publish that you have tapped it. It's not the same as a squealer, but close.

You know who else liked dirty rats.

www.ferdyonfilms.com
 
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