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(WFAA Fort Worth)   Researchers with the NS Sherlock Institute for the Blindingly Obvious determine car windows, being made of a previously unknown transparent material tentatively named 'glass' until it can be studied further, does not protect you from the Sun's rays   (wfaa.com) divider line 17
    More: Stupid, transparent materials, St. Louis University, laminated glass, shard  
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857 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Sep 2013 at 3:44 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-07 12:11:52 PM
No, but your windshield does have a UV-resistant coating on it. I found out about the efficacy the hard way when I bought a pair of Transitions eyeglasses. I am nearsighted, so I primarily need them for driving. Since (at the time) I couldn't wear contacts and I didn't want the hassle of carrying around and potentially losing a pair of prescription sunglasses, I figured that I would kill two birds with one stone and get the Transitions lenses.

Nope... because of the coating on the windshield they do not work in your car. That being said, I love them for outdoor events and the like. It was really nice being able to walk outside for a barbeque or whatnot and gradually not having to squint because of the sunlight.

/that was before I burst into flames and did my impersonation of a tomato
//hurray for having a recessive ginger-gene and lupus!
 
2013-09-07 12:23:33 PM
The UV coating is fairly ineffective.  DNRTA, but the incidence of skin cancer on the left arm of truck drivers has increased quite a bit over the past few years.  Whether it's because someone started keeping stats, or it's an actual increase, I don't know.  But it's become enough of a concern that many trucking companies discuss it during safety meetings and encourage drivers to slather on the sun screen extra heavy on that arm.

/because it's the arm nearest the window
 
2013-09-07 01:47:05 PM

Rodeodoc: The UV coating is fairly ineffective.  DNRTA, but the incidence of skin cancer on the left arm of truck drivers has increased quite a bit over the past few years.  Whether it's because someone started keeping stats, or it's an actual increase, I don't know.  But it's become enough of a concern that many trucking companies discuss it during safety meetings and encourage drivers to slather on the sun screen extra heavy on that arm.

/because it's the arm nearest the window


You mean the window that's usually down?
 
2013-09-07 03:29:39 PM

Anastacya: No, but your windshield does have a UV-resistant coating on it. I found out about the efficacy the hard way when I bought a pair of Transitions eyeglasses. I am nearsighted, so I primarily need them for driving. Since (at the time) I couldn't wear contacts and I didn't want the hassle of carrying around and potentially losing a pair of prescription sunglasses, I figured that I would kill two birds with one stone and get the Transitions lenses.

Nope... because of the coating on the windshield they do not work in your car. That being said, I love them for outdoor events and the like. It was really nice being able to walk outside for a barbeque or whatnot and gradually not having to squint because of the sunlight.

/that was before I burst into flames and did my impersonation of a tomato
//hurray for having a recessive ginger-gene and lupus!


I've got Transitions lenses too, but they seem to work just fine in my car. Weird.
 
2013-09-07 03:53:27 PM
Oh yeah dumbassmitter? Then why does it get so hot inside my car on sunny days?
 
2013-09-07 04:09:53 PM
infrared light is where the heat is at
last windshield i saw had a uv rating of 400 so i question the 59 in the article
 
2013-09-07 04:11:41 PM
50+ not 59 oops.
 
2013-09-07 04:20:44 PM
[Cool history lesson, bro]
At the Trinity Bomb Test, present members of Project Manhattan watched somewhat haphazardly from various locations without much thought given to local shielding (they were miles away after all). Two scientists though, I forget which, observed from inside one of their cars on the theory that the glass would sufficiently protect them from stray radiation. Of course, this is all wildly naive today, but it's not like that line of thinking is off base.
[/Cool history lesson, bro]
 
2013-09-07 04:38:42 PM

Via Infinito: Anastacya: No, but your windshield does have a UV-resistant coating on it. I found out about the efficacy the hard way when I bought a pair of Transitions eyeglasses. I am nearsighted, so I primarily need them for driving. Since (at the time) I couldn't wear contacts and I didn't want the hassle of carrying around and potentially losing a pair of prescription sunglasses, I figured that I would kill two birds with one stone and get the Transitions lenses.

Nope... because of the coating on the windshield they do not work in your car. That being said, I love them for outdoor events and the like. It was really nice being able to walk outside for a barbeque or whatnot and gradually not having to squint because of the sunlight.

/that was before I burst into flames and did my impersonation of a tomato
//hurray for having a recessive ginger-gene and lupus!

I've got Transitions lenses too, but they seem to work just fine in my car. Weird.


That was when I first bought Transitions, gosh... 2009ish? The last pair of lenses that I had I bought in 2011. My car is a 2008, so I do not know if that makes a difference. I just remember mentioning why I was getting them to the lens tech and she told me that they don't work in a vehicle. Maybe they changed the lenses since then. It would be awesome; I did love those when I had them.
 
2013-09-07 05:05:01 PM

saintwrathchild: [Cool history lesson, bro]
At the Trinity Bomb Test, present members of Project Manhattan watched somewhat haphazardly from various locations without much thought given to local shielding (they were miles away after all). Two scientists though, I forget which, observed from inside one of their cars on the theory that the glass would sufficiently protect them from stray radiation. Of course, this is all wildly naive today, but it's not like that line of thinking is off base.
[/Cool history lesson, bro]


Richard Feynman. Who died after he got two rare forms of cancer simultaneously.
 
2013-09-07 05:17:11 PM

itcamefromschenectady: Richard Feynman. Who died after he got two rare forms of cancer simultaneously.


Yes, thank you. Cautionary tales and whatnot.
 
2013-09-07 06:28:19 PM

saintwrathchild: [Cool history lesson, bro]
At the Trinity Bomb Test, present members of Project Manhattan watched somewhat haphazardly from various locations without much thought given to local shielding (they were miles away after all). Two scientists though, I forget which, observed from inside one of their cars on the theory that the glass would sufficiently protect them from stray radiation. Of course, this is all wildly naive today, but it's not like that line of thinking is off base.
[/Cool history lesson, bro]


Plain glass affords some protection against UV light. So at the Trinity test, Feynman wanted to watch the blast without the protective eyewear so he leapt into a vehicle and ditched the goggles.
 
2013-09-07 07:33:20 PM

itcamefromschenectady: saintwrathchild: [Cool history lesson, bro]
At the Trinity Bomb Test, present members of Project Manhattan watched somewhat haphazardly from various locations without much thought given to local shielding (they were miles away after all). Two scientists though, I forget which, observed from inside one of their cars on the theory that the glass would sufficiently protect them from stray radiation. Of course, this is all wildly naive today, but it's not like that line of thinking is off base.
[/Cool history lesson, bro]
Richard Feynman. Who died after he got two rare forms of cancer simultaneously.


Well, I guess he wasn't as smart as everyone thinks he is, then.
 
2013-09-07 09:58:53 PM

Anastacya: Via Infinito: Anastacya: No, but your windshield does have a UV-resistant coating on it. I found out about the efficacy the hard way when I bought a pair of Transitions eyeglasses. I am nearsighted, so I primarily need them for driving. Since (at the time) I couldn't wear contacts and I didn't want the hassle of carrying around and potentially losing a pair of prescription sunglasses, I figured that I would kill two birds with one stone and get the Transitions lenses.

Nope... because of the coating on the windshield they do not work in your car. That being said, I love them for outdoor events and the like. It was really nice being able to walk outside for a barbeque or whatnot and gradually not having to squint because of the sunlight.

/that was before I burst into flames and did my impersonation of a tomato
//hurray for having a recessive ginger-gene and lupus!

I've got Transitions lenses too, but they seem to work just fine in my car. Weird.

That was when I first bought Transitions, gosh... 2009ish? The last pair of lenses that I had I bought in 2011. My car is a 2008, so I do not know if that makes a difference. I just remember mentioning why I was getting them to the lens tech and she told me that they don't work in a vehicle. Maybe they changed the lenses since then. It would be awesome; I did love those when I had them.


It isn't the glasses, it's the cars.  They are triggered by UV, so Via's car must have poor UV filtering.

<CSB> Back in the 80s I had a pair of photochromic lenses.  Every single flash photo of me from that period has me looking like a douche wearing sunglasses indoors </CSB>
 
2013-09-07 10:36:44 PM

cryinoutloud: itcamefromschenectady: saintwrathchild: [Cool history lesson, bro]
At the Trinity Bomb Test, present members of Project Manhattan watched somewhat haphazardly from various locations without much thought given to local shielding (they were miles away after all). Two scientists though, I forget which, observed from inside one of their cars on the theory that the glass would sufficiently protect them from stray radiation. Of course, this is all wildly naive today, but it's not like that line of thinking is off base.
[/Cool history lesson, bro]
Richard Feynman. Who died after he got two rare forms of cancer simultaneously.

Well, I guess he wasn't as smart as everyone thinks he is, then.


My comment was a bit trollish.

He didn't get cancer for another 40 years or so. And wearing goggles probably wouldn't have prevented it.
 
2013-09-07 11:25:42 PM

itcamefromschenectady: cryinoutloud: itcamefromschenectady: saintwrathchild: [Cool history lesson, bro]
At the Trinity Bomb Test, present members of Project Manhattan watched somewhat haphazardly from various locations without much thought given to local shielding (they were miles away after all). Two scientists though, I forget which, observed from inside one of their cars on the theory that the glass would sufficiently protect them from stray radiation. Of course, this is all wildly naive today, but it's not like that line of thinking is off base.
[/Cool history lesson, bro]
Richard Feynman. Who died after he got two rare forms of cancer simultaneously.

Well, I guess he wasn't as smart as everyone thinks he is, then.

My comment was a bit trollish.

He didn't get cancer for another 40 years or so. And wearing goggles probably wouldn't have prevented it.


And if he had any reason to believe it was from his work, he'd have said so. There were people who died from radiation poisoning, after all. I also think he would have corrected the UV story as it's one I've encountered three different times in his interviews and writings (and I'm sure it's mentioned many more).

/big fan of Feynman
//never met him, wish I had
///he loved the sluts
 
2013-09-08 07:57:51 AM
 
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