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(Yahoo)   In Little Rock, the students will now have to remove the teachers underwear before being molested   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 110
    More: Obvious, Little Rock, Little Rock School District, school districts, teachers  
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14697 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Sep 2013 at 10:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-07 11:25:59 AM
And this kind of stuff is exactly why people don't take teachers and the teaching profession seriously.

Also, do unions just automatically oppose everything??? Calling a rule prohibiting flip flops and cutoffs degrading and condescending is ridiculous. The fact that some teachers or anyone in a professional role would think this would be acceptable work attire says a lot about the person.

Sorry, but you wouldn't be working for me. Grow the fark up.
 
2013-09-07 11:27:02 AM

KrispyKritter: OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.

seeking employment 20-25-30 years ago multiple times i had potential employers thank me for wearing a suit and a tie to fill out an application or interview. was more than a little surprised each time. i wouldn't hire someone who isn't attired for the position they seek.


I wore a full on suit to interview for my current job which is in a scientific lab.  We dont wear suits IN the lab obviously, but I can imagine its hard to take someone seriously in an interview if they show up in a shiate looking tshirt.

Now tshirts in lab are perfectly ok, no one wants to ruin nice cloths with chemicals and the various other things I come into contact with on a daily basis.  Lab coats only cover so much of you.
 
2013-09-07 11:31:26 AM

OhioUGrad: KrispyKritter: OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.

seeking employment 20-25-30 years ago multiple times i had potential employers thank me for wearing a suit and a tie to fill out an application or interview. was more than a little surprised each time. i wouldn't hire someone who isn't attired for the position they seek.

I think part of that nowadays might attribute to some of the younger generations not getting hired. They don't treat the job/environment as professional and assume with a diploma comes a job and don't take interviews serious. If I am researching a place I'll even dress up because you don't know who you'll run into.


You know, Talk of the Nation had a program not long before ending about about dress codes and there was a teacher discussing the (mostly) negative response he received from both students and fellow teachers from wearing a suit and tie everyday he taught. It really sounds like a situation where you just can't win.
 
2013-09-07 11:32:06 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Pocket Ninja: jaylectricity: A teacher wearing no panties with a short skirt is distracting. Boys will be staring all day just hoping it rides up a little too high.

But if the dress is tight yet long, that underwear line is going to keep the boys distracted all day long.

It is an interesting conundrum, one that I don't think has ever really been explored through science. Are panty lines more distracting through their *absence* because of the suggested implications of the woman wearing a sexy thong or nothing at all, or are they more distracting when you *can* see them, because, well, you can see her panties? Fascinating. Maybe I'll try to get some Federal grant money to pursue this further.

Doesn't matter... between puberty and manopause, men will be distracted by a (reasonably attractive woman tight clothes, or loose clothes, or no clothes, or too many clothes). If the outlines of a figure can be divined through observation then the brain takes over to become distracted.


Also women at a distance.

Or at night. I get a sillhouette boner from time to time.
 
2013-09-07 11:32:30 AM
There's an old saying that goes something like this, "dress for the job you want, not the job you have."

I think that's pretty accurate. I wear a suit to work on days when I know I have important meetings. If I'm just working in my office it's slacks, shirt and tie. It always amazes me when people see me in these meetings and I'm wearing jacket and tie they usually turn to me to ask questions and treat me with more respect.
 
2013-09-07 11:32:54 AM

italie: With helpful pic of what your teachers underwear does did not look like.


img.fark.net

I know. *sob*
 
2013-09-07 11:34:05 AM

Smackledorfer: Uchiha_Cycliste: Pocket Ninja: jaylectricity: A teacher wearing no panties with a short skirt is distracting. Boys will be staring all day just hoping it rides up a little too high.

But if the dress is tight yet long, that underwear line is going to keep the boys distracted all day long.

It is an interesting conundrum, one that I don't think has ever really been explored through science. Are panty lines more distracting through their *absence* because of the suggested implications of the woman wearing a sexy thong or nothing at all, or are they more distracting when you *can* see them, because, well, you can see her panties? Fascinating. Maybe I'll try to get some Federal grant money to pursue this further.

Doesn't matter... between puberty and manopause, men will be distracted by a (reasonably attractive woman tight clothes, or loose clothes, or no clothes, or too many clothes). If the outlines of a figure can be divined through observation then the brain takes over to become distracted.

Also women at a distance.

Or at night. I get a sillhouette boner from time to time.


I'm pretty sure it's a built in response. Oh look, a woman who's not enormous or disfigured time for a boner!
 
2013-09-07 11:35:17 AM
Also, while I conform to society because dressing better rewards me, I think the human obsession with complex wardrobes is retarded. It is all in your minds.
 
2013-09-07 11:38:00 AM

WordyGrrl: TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...

Maybe all professions need that seminar these days. A friend of mine had to issue a memo to an office full of counselors (people with Masters and PhD degrees in psychology and counseling) that dressing like a professional authority figure rather than a beach bum served an important purpose beyond just "looking nice." It helped reduce the chances of getting assaulted by the clients (many of whom had PTSD).

When the counselors began dressing too casually, the clientele started to get the impression that the casually-dressed counselors were just lowly customer service agents whose job it was to give the client whatever he/she wanted, regardless of whether or not that client qualified for a particular benefit. Several clients got so rude and threatening that security was called to escort them out of the building and off the premises.


Painfully true.  I work for a medium size consulting firm and when we hire new consultants I am usually the guy who ends up training them.  I spend as much time teaching these individuals how to be a consultant (how to dress, show up early/on-time, how to interact with various levels of management, body language and why it is important, how to pack a suitcase and travel for fark's sake) as I do teaching them the subject matter that is our expertise.  As a friend of mine who is a muckety-muck with Wells Fargo once told me "...it is always ok to be the most over-dressed person in the room.  It is never ok to be the most under-dressed in the room".
 
2013-09-07 11:44:38 AM
Well ...  I got nothing ...

(wtf do they look like that you  have to tell them)
 
2013-09-07 11:44:47 AM

Smackledorfer: Also, while I conform to society because dressing better rewards me, I think the human obsession with complex wardrobes is retarded. It is all in your minds.


Actually, I prefer suit and tie...Dark suit, white shirt, dark tie...Not even I can screw that up...

/I miss the days when all I had to do was match the animals on the pants and shirt to get them to match
//Lucky enough to have married a woman who can tactfully tell me I am not going out in public wearing "That"
 
2013-09-07 11:45:39 AM

Twist2005: poison_amy: These teachers would never make it in the facility where I teach. Not only do I have to wear underwear, I also have to go through a metal detector and do a series of calisthenics to make sure none of my clothing shifts, clings, rides, gaps, or otherwise provides a glimpse of skin from knee to collarbone. Doesn't stop my students from trying to see though, and they aren't even teenagers.

Where the hell do you teach?! I usually do the "on your knees, bend forward, then stand on your toes and reach" routine, but it's something I do at home with a mirror. There's nobody supervising it.

Also, no metal detectors.

/Gotta love SW VA


State penitentiary.  Of course it's a 150 year old building with no air conditioning, so it's extremely uncomfortable to be covered head to toe in the summer but if I wanted to go parading around panty-less I would just go teach 8th grade at the public school.
 
2013-09-07 11:45:44 AM

Abox: [assets.sbnation.com image 455x341]

/remembers when the teacher was a much older woman: kindly, discreet, unattractive.


yea really most of my teachers were born before underwear was invented
 
2013-09-07 11:47:35 AM
i18.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-07 11:52:08 AM

Lochsteppe: ZAZ: Organized labor vocally opposes the new universal underwear requirement

This is my favorite sentence of the day so far, but I've only been up for two hours.

The unions are just trying to protect their members' hard-earned right to academic freeballing.


Along with the school officials suddenly deciding out of the blue that this is a problem there's plenty of derp here to go around.

I'm truly glad my kids are done with their schooling now and I don't have to deal with moronic officials and uninterested teaching staff. I can just sit back and watch the unions, teachers and school officials go at it.
 
2013-09-07 12:03:09 PM
So... No hot for teacher thread, huh.

/moseys off
//but seriously, it's a shame they even needed to establish this rule. I'm not anti-union, but here the union needs to stfu.
 
2013-09-07 12:07:20 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: OhioUGrad: KrispyKritter: OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.

seeking employment 20-25-30 years ago multiple times i had potential employers thank me for wearing a suit and a tie to fill out an application or interview. was more than a little surprised each time. i wouldn't hire someone who isn't attired for the position they seek.

I think part of that nowadays might attribute to some of the younger generations not getting hired. They don't treat the job/environment as professional and assume with a diploma comes a job and don't take interviews serious. If I am researching a place I'll even dress up because you don't know who you'll run into.

You know, Talk of the Nation had a program not long before ending about about dress codes and there was a teacher discussing the (mostly) negative response he received from both students and fellow teachers from wearing a suit and tie everyday he taught. It really sounds like a situation where you just can't win.


I agree that it's pretty dated in most professions, but when you have idiots who still think that flip-flops, ripped jeans, and provocative shirts for women are acceptable, it's not going to go anywhere. Not to mention suits are hot, women have a LOT more freedom when it comes to what they can wear (I think if you make a man wear a suit and tie, women should have to as well......I mean they are all about equality, right??). I think you'll always have some sort of dress code though, because idiots just don't learn.
 
2013-09-07 12:13:07 PM
But who gets to check to see if he's wearing underwear?
 
2013-09-07 12:15:55 PM

KrispyKritter: OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.

seeking employment 20-25-30 years ago multiple times i had potential employers thank me for wearing a suit and a tie to fill out an application or interview. was more than a little surprised each time. i wouldn't hire someone who isn't attired for the position they seek.


Of course, there's the opposite, as well. Companies that expect you to show up for work in a call center in suit and tie. Okay, I exaggerate- "business casual" is the rule. I mean, the damn customers can't see what the employees are wearing, so why's it matter??
 
2013-09-07 12:22:23 PM

brimed03: So... No hot for teacher thread, huh.


I'll just leave this here.
 
2013-09-07 12:23:11 PM

wantingout: Well i'm glad the used the word 'verboten' in this story. Next it'll be "Ihre Papier Bitte".


No, next it'll be "Ihre bra und panties, bitte."
Seriously, this is just an excuse for administration to get hot teachers to show them their undies.
 
2013-09-07 12:24:26 PM
Teacher dress code should be at least as stringent as the student one. Anything else is totally hypocritical. In my experience teachers will tell another teacher if something is inappropriate. Usually the little old lady who it's impossible to take offense to ends up having to do it.

I used to wear dress pants and button up shirts.
Now I wear Jeans and usually a collared or button up shirt. It's a choice. I give up a little authority in order to be more relatable to the student base here. It fits my teaching style. And I'm old enough now to need to be more relatable.

We had a 19-year-old come into the middle school I worked in last year as an aide. He wore a shirt and tie every day. He needed to; he needed that obvious separation from the kids.

If this was a problem, I can see why the district made the policy. But in my experience, district administration does these things just because they like to exhibit their power, not because there was an actual problem. That's probably why teachers are upset.
 
2013-09-07 12:31:24 PM

OhioUGrad: Uchiha_Cycliste: OhioUGrad: KrispyKritter: OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.

seeking employment 20-25-30 years ago multiple times i had potential employers thank me for wearing a suit and a tie to fill out an application or interview. was more than a little surprised each time. i wouldn't hire someone who isn't attired for the position they seek.

I think part of that nowadays might attribute to some of the younger generations not getting hired. They don't treat the job/environment as professional and assume with a diploma comes a job and don't take interviews serious. If I am researching a place I'll even dress up because you don't know who you'll run into.

You know, Talk of the Nation had a program not long before ending about about dress codes and there was a teacher discussing the (mostly) negative response he received from both students and fellow teachers from wearing a suit and tie everyday he taught. It really sounds like a situation where you just can't win.

I agree that it's pretty dated in most professions, but when you have idiots who still think that flip-flops, ripped jeans, and provocative shirts for women are acceptable, it's not going to go anywhere. Not to mention suits are hot, women have a LOT more freedom when it comes to what they can wear (I think ...


I don't think it's that idiots don't learn. I think that it's that they take inappropriate advantage of being told their wardrobe is left to their discretion. They are so busy deciding what they can get away with that they don't consider whether what they are doing is a wise decision. Essentially they are given the option to exercise self-control (or not) an wholly abandon any semblance of maturity simply because they can.
 
2013-09-07 12:34:30 PM

italie: With helpful pic of what your teachers underwear does not look like.

[l.yimg.com image 630x270]


Art Frahm lives!
 
2013-09-07 12:37:43 PM
Was this an issue, or was it something that was passed despite there being no problem with teachers' dress and designed to make it sound like teachers were wearing inappropriate clothes? The letter from the union would make sense if that were the case. I worked at a unionized plant where the plant manager (unabashedly racist, he moved from South Africa because he didn't want to live in a post-Apartheid country and brought his racism with him to the States) issued rule after rule about things that never happened, like defecating on the production lines. But he wanted to beat down the mostly black workforce, make them understand that he thought they were animals and incapable of decency.

The plant ended up being closed down, production moved to another state because of the toxic environment he left behind when he was fired. When I was there, my boss was still the only salaried minority.

I don't automatically assume that a rule being created is a response to an actual problem, especially when the response is that it is degrading for the rule to even exist. The creation of the rule creates the perception of an existing problem. Why have a rule against something if it wasn't happening? Well, what if the people creating the rule simply were trying to cast the workers in a poor light by creating the perception?
 
2013-09-07 12:37:49 PM

fredklein: KrispyKritter: OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.

seeking employment 20-25-30 years ago multiple times i had potential employers thank me for wearing a suit and a tie to fill out an application or interview. was more than a little surprised each time. i wouldn't hire someone who isn't attired for the position they seek.

Of course, there's the opposite, as well. Companies that expect you to show up for work in a call center in suit and tie. Okay, I exaggerate- "business casual" is the rule. I mean, the damn customers can't see what the employees are wearing, so why's it matter??


Having worked in a call center in a supervisory capacity, I can tell you that when we tried to go to a full time casual dress code, behavior did change: people got lazier, talked more, etc... We also went through more crappy employees during that time. After we changed back, it got back to normal. When I left, we still had casual dress Fri-Sun and during most of the summer (unless clients came in).

I, of course, still had to dress business casual every day.
 
2013-09-07 12:38:38 PM

MediaAreAllHacks: Anything else is totally hypocritical.


Pet peeve, but you aren't using that word right.

Teachers aren't students, and a teacher may certainly feel one rule applies to them while another applies to students. If two groups are different or are in different circumstances, there is no problem with them having different rules. Moreover, since teachers do not make the rules for students but administrators do, there is nothing hypocritical about a teacher showing up to work in cutoffs if that is technically allowed while at the same time the students are forced to wear tuxedos. You might be able to make an argument that the administrative staff could not make a student or teacher dress code without making an administrative staff dress code, but the different groups bit still applies.

Believing "I can do X because I am a Y, but you need to do Z because you are a T" is not an example of hypocrisy. Only if the stated beliefs of the administration was "all people should dress well" and then they didn't dress well would that be hypocrisy.

tldr: 'do as I say not as I do' is not necessarily an example of hypocrisy.

MediaAreAllHacks: But in my experience, district administration does these things just because they like to exhibit their power, not because there was an actual problem. That's probably why teachers are upset.


Combine that with what will no doubt include ambiguous wording and the administration will have one more way to fire without true cause.
 
2013-09-07 12:56:51 PM

TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...


I'm nowhere near "off my lawn" age, and I totally agree.  If you want to go commando in your free time, because it's more comfortable or whatever, that's fine.  At work though, you should be dressed appropriately, and that includes wearing underwear.  That's just basic common sense to me.  What you do when you're not at work is no one's business, but when you're on the job, you should at least have the intellect to not leave your house half-dressed.  It doesn't matter if no one will see or won't be able to tell.

I'm honestly a bit taken aback that grown adults in charge of educating our young have to be told to wear underwear.  That's just farking sad.
 
2013-09-07 12:58:44 PM

TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...


FTFA "In 2012, teachers in the beachside hamlet of Hampton, N.H. called an attempt to prevent teachers from wearing jeans, tank-tops and flip-flops "derogatory and condescending."

these people have no concept of professional dress. and yet they wonder why they don't get respected as professionals.

tank tops for christ sake? as a school teacher? at work? WTF

/yes i'm well into get off my lawn age but good lord.
 
2013-09-07 12:58:54 PM
Their new motto:  Semper Ubi Sub Ubi
 
2013-09-07 01:01:33 PM

Big_Doofus: Also, do unions just automatically oppose everything???


Yes.
 
2013-09-07 01:11:12 PM
Go ahead, school. I absolutely dare you to try and check if your female teacher is wearing underwear if she says she is. Seems like early retirement for both parties, except the teacher will have a new house and car for it.
 
2013-09-07 01:23:20 PM

Curious: TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...

FTFA "In 2012, teachers in the beachside hamlet of Hampton, N.H. called an attempt to prevent teachers from wearing jeans, tank-tops and flip-flops "derogatory and condescending."

these people have no concept of professional dress. and yet they wonder why they don't get respected as professionals.

tank tops for christ sake? as a school teacher? at work? WTF

/yes i'm well into get off my lawn age but good lord.


My sister is a music teacher and considering the amount of furniture, equipment and instruments she has to reposition and lug around, I think she would be glad if she could wear a tank top. I don't think she would because she likes to look more professional, but it would be more comfortable I'm sure. Gym teachers aren't the only ones who have to move around.
 
2013-09-07 01:25:57 PM

OhioUGrad: skinink: The no flip flops thing I agree with. you're at your job, not at Margaritaville. Just wear casual shoes or flats. Just dress sensibly at work. I can't believe grownups have to be told that and the union is making a big deal of this.

It's amazing the amount of people who don't understand the difference between what you wear on the weekend with your friends and what you wear to work even in a casual work environment. I interviewed for an IT job at a college at the start of the year, and wore a shirt and tie and dress pants (totally different from my baggy pants and t-shirt home routine) the woman told me I was the only person she interviewed who dressed up and most people came in jeans and one had on flip-flops.




The shorts and flip flops to work crowd is normally fat and it is hard for them to be comfortable being dressed like a normal person.
 
2013-09-07 01:34:15 PM

BolloxReader: Was this an issue, or was it something that was passed despite there being no problem with teachers' dress and designed to make it sound like teachers were wearing inappropriate clothes? The letter from the union would make sense if that were the case. I worked at a unionized plant where the plant manager (unabashedly racist, he moved from South Africa because he didn't want to live in a post-Apartheid country and brought his racism with him to the States) issued rule after rule about things that never happened, like defecating on the production lines. But he wanted to beat down the mostly black workforce, make them understand that he thought they were animals and incapable of decency.

The plant ended up being closed down, production moved to another state because of the toxic environment he left behind when he was fired. When I was there, my boss was still the only salaried minority.

I don't automatically assume that a rule being created is a response to an actual problem, especially when the response is that it is degrading for the rule to even exist. The creation of the rule creates the perception of an existing problem. Why have a rule against something if it wasn't happening? Well, what if the people creating the rule simply were trying to cast the workers in a poor light by creating the perception?


ding ding ding, we have a winner.... and the icing on the cake is the termination for "insubordination" based on subjective or arbitrary enforcement...

but please, let's carry on with the teacher bashing because unions.  hurr durr
 
2013-09-07 02:14:55 PM

Coco LaFemme: TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...

I'm nowhere near "off my lawn" age, and I totally agree.  If you want to go commando in your free time, because it's more comfortable or whatever, that's fine.  At work though, you should be dressed appropriately, and that includes wearing underwear.  That's just basic common sense to me.  What you do when you're not at work is no one's business, but when you're on the job, you should at least have the intellect to not leave your house half-dressed.  It doesn't matter if no one will see or won't be able to tell.

I'm honestly a bit taken aback that grown adults in charge of educating our young have to be told to wear underwear.  That's just farking sad.


You shouldn't wear plastic bags over your head.  The fact I told you this must mean you are a mouth-breathing retard of the highest order.
 
2013-09-07 02:24:40 PM

Gimmick: Coco LaFemme: TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...

I'm nowhere near "off my lawn" age, and I totally agree.  If you want to go commando in your free time, because it's more comfortable or whatever, that's fine.  At work though, you should be dressed appropriately, and that includes wearing underwear.  That's just basic common sense to me.  What you do when you're not at work is no one's business, but when you're on the job, you should at least have the intellect to not leave your house half-dressed.  It doesn't matter if no one will see or won't be able to tell.

I'm honestly a bit taken aback that grown adults in charge of educating our young have to be told to wear underwear.  That's just farking sad.

You shouldn't wear plastic bags over your head.  The fact I told you this must mean you are a mouth-breathing retard of the highest order.


?????

Warnings on products are there mostly because of children, not adults.  I don't see how that's similar to a dress code requiring all teachers to wear underpants.
 
2013-09-07 02:36:25 PM
Typical Little Rock school district. Ignore the elephant in the room and focus on the teacher's underwear. Sounds legit.
 
2013-09-07 02:49:51 PM

Coco LaFemme: Gimmick: Coco LaFemme: TheMaskedArmadillo: Not clear on why this is an issue...I may be getting close to "Get off my lawn" age, but shouldn't professionals (in this case professional teachers) know how to dress professionally?  Perhaps the teacher's union should hold a seminar for its members for how to dress in the classroom instead of writing strongly worded letters...

I'm nowhere near "off my lawn" age, and I totally agree.  If you want to go commando in your free time, because it's more comfortable or whatever, that's fine.  At work though, you should be dressed appropriately, and that includes wearing underwear.  That's just basic common sense to me.  What you do when you're not at work is no one's business, but when you're on the job, you should at least have the intellect to not leave your house half-dressed.  It doesn't matter if no one will see or won't be able to tell.

I'm honestly a bit taken aback that grown adults in charge of educating our young have to be told to wear underwear.  That's just farking sad.

You shouldn't wear plastic bags over your head.  The fact I told you this must mean you are a mouth-breathing retard of the highest order.

?????

Warnings on products are there mostly because of children, not adults.  I don't see how that's similar to a dress code requiring all teachers to wear underpants.


Then you have missed a much repeated point in the thread: there may very well have been zero problems with people meeting a decent dress code, and the rule is only being added for other reasons, which include things like making others assume that teachers were such scum they had to be told not to wear underwear as well as an excuse to fire without real cause using a loosely defined dressing policy.  Remember this is a very public and politically attacked union.  Any number of union-busting legislators would love to turn public sentiment their way by adding things like this and then using them to imply the teachers are a bunch of immoral sluts on the government dole.

Then when they fire the teacher they don't like (for political reasons, because she threatened a harassment lawsuit, whatever) they can point to the two prior warnings they gave him/her for a nonsense policy violation as cause.  Catch the teacher with his shirt slightly untucked towards the end of the long day, write up a final written reprimand, and you've got yourself an easily fired teacher.

That said, I don't know the specifics, and neither does anywhere else here.  Many a ridiculous policy HAS had to be added because some dumb farker was doing it too.  But as a union member (not teacher's union) I see the union fight over bullshiat obscure policies added for exactly this reason every time our contract gets renegotiated. These things are added for no reason other than to give the supervisory staff the leeway to discriminate or fire without cause while having an excuse cause in which to do it.

Of course, not everything unions fight for is awesome, and the union bashers can surely point to abuse, but until legislators end their grift and ceos lose their ridiculous cheating of sitting on one another's boards and voting massive salaries, I'm going to pick the little guy in the adversarial system and not the bigger guy.  ymmv.
 
2013-09-07 03:08:22 PM

BolloxReader: I don't automatically assume that a rule being created is a response to an actual problem,


Given that we have several teachers per week arrested for banging grade school kids in the backs of cars, I really, honestly, don't find it at all difficult to believe that appropriate dress is also a problem with some teachers.   The idea that they might wear inappropriate clothing is tame compared to the blatant teacher stupidity we read about all the time.  In fact, I would be surprised if wasn't a problem with many twenty something teachers.

Most professional workplaces have a dress code.  The union needs to pick a different fight or just go away entirely.
 
2013-09-07 03:18:30 PM

eaglepuss: My sister is a music teacher and considering the amount of furniture, equipment and instruments she has to reposition and lug around, I think she would be glad if she could wear a tank top. I don't think she would because she likes to look more professional, but it would be more comfortable I'm sure. Gym teachers aren't the only ones who have to move around.


you answered the point with "she like to look more professional". there is no teaching situation where a tank top is professional.
 
2013-09-07 03:31:54 PM
This is Little Rock, so I'm guessing shoes are still optional, right?
 
2013-09-07 03:40:31 PM

Mentalpatient87: Hot teachers in their underwear thread?


Paging The Stealth Hippopotamus. The Stealth Hippopotamus to the nearest terminal please.
 
2013-09-07 04:03:30 PM

js34603: So would they perhaps be hiring for the position of underwear compliance officer?


Let's see. Someone from Little Rock who would be perfect for a job like that...

I got it!

1.bp.blogspot.com

I will never forget my eighth grade social studies teacher. She wore very sheer skirts and no underwear. Nothing between her and the eye but a single layer of thin, sheer, diaphanous silk that left nothing to the imagination. From the front impressive but whenever she bent over in class? Yikes! Since this was the 70's bras had gone out of style for a young liberated female teacher also. On a cold day? WOW! I (and all the other boys in class) spent most of that year in the john rubbing one out. That was also the year my dad went to every parent teacher meeting and even volunteered to chaperone field trips. She was most appropriately named too. Miss Cox.

/CSB
//I'm sure it was the mothers in the PTA who eventually pressured the school to transfer her
///There was an old badger there the next year for my younger brother poor kid
////Or, maybe some lucky kid got her "in trouble" they kept those things quiet in those days
 
2013-09-07 05:02:29 PM
If they wear their underwear on their head, they should be okay.
 
2013-09-07 05:06:03 PM
"Foundational garments"  sounds like the roaring twenties to me.
 
2013-09-07 05:24:47 PM

CoysOdie: "Foundational garments"  sounds like the roaring twenties to me.


You can't put "panties" in a press release....

images.wikia.com
 
2013-09-07 05:35:25 PM
If they are learning and its keeping their attention, I really don't see the problem

phyx.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-09-07 05:39:24 PM
ct.fra.bz
 
2013-09-07 05:41:15 PM
ct.fra.bz
 
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