If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mother Nature Network)   Sure, you say you value your online privacy, but why aren't you erasing your cookies, encrypting your email, and clearing your browser?   (mnn.com) divider line 109
    More: Interesting, browser, digital footprint, American Life, Pew Internet, Internet filter, American Internet, TechNewsDaily, personal network  
•       •       •

6142 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Sep 2013 at 10:07 AM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



109 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-07 08:46:33 AM
The thing about cookies is after you clear them you have to go back and teach the website how you want to use it. Yeah, it sucks that some cookies have nothing to do with that, but a lot times it's as simple as remembering your userid for a website you don't use a lot and is of little consequence to anybody but you.
 
2013-09-07 09:05:39 AM
Encrypting your email? Sure, I can do that. And everyone I send this encrypted email to will not be able to read it. Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago. Try to get someone not familiar with encryption to "send their public key" sometime.

The only people I know with public keys (on keyservers) that are used regularly are old internet weirdos, and they are communicating with other old internet weirdos about nothing important.
 
2013-09-07 10:13:20 AM
I do that every few days or so. Love my Ccleaner.

Well, besides the Email encryption. I don't do anything on there worth encrypting, TBH.
 
2013-09-07 10:18:41 AM

b0rscht: Encrypting your email? Sure, I can do that. And everyone I send this encrypted email to will not be able to read it. Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago. Try to get someone not familiar with encryption to "send their public key" sometime.


Hushmail has integrated it. But naturally you still need both the sender and receiver to use it.
 
2013-09-07 10:19:08 AM
I do everything noted except the email encryption. It is a pain in the ass and my friends don't do it so it kind of is pointless.
 
2013-09-07 10:21:52 AM
Because anyone remotely tech-savvy disallows cookies to begin with, and any that they have they've specifically approved for sites they use and assumably trust to handle at least the relatively public information of general online activity.

Because e-mail isn't private communication, particularly, and most sensible people just don't use it as such rather than piling on extra steps to try to make it something it isn't.

... because their browser history isn't remotely accessible barring some outright illegal computer intrusion, and anyone that is realistically going to see it has physical access to your computer, meaning they have physical access to all your other shiat, meaning you probably trust them enough to share the fact that you're a fan of BustyAsianBeauties.com or whatever the hell if they decide they actually care.

There.  Mysteries solved.
 
2013-09-07 10:23:12 AM
"Sure, you say you value your online privacy?"


I don't say that. I really don't care. As other has said I don't do anything that I feel I need to protect. I also go to the bathroom with the window open so maybe I am weird.
 
2013-09-07 10:24:49 AM
Don't websites in Europe require cookies by law?
 
2013-09-07 10:25:17 AM

comhcinc: I don't say that. I really don't care. As other has said I don't do anything that I feel I need to protect.


Cool. I'll be over tomorrow morning to set up a camera in your living room. That is, unless you have something to hide.
 
2013-09-07 10:28:25 AM
Firefox with no script, adblocker, foxy proxy, and ghostery installed
SurfEasy with direct link to my computer at home for when I travel
Ccleaner and Malwarebytes run at regular intervals
"Acquired" material from trusted sources
TOR client installed on a blank VM running generic XP with no personal information on it
Using Linux Mint with a VM for gaming.
Truecrypt for my external drive and all my passwords are based off a rotating amalgamation system (4 base passwords with 4 iterations of each password, each subsection of my life - Fark, Amazon, Banking, etc - independant from the others to make a total breach more difficult and the only key I have is a txt file on my flashdrive saying what coding it is - "Gmail: 3A" - meaning third password, first iteration)

Can I get a gold star?
 
2013-09-07 10:30:37 AM
love the paranoia.... just get ghostery and don't do something bad..
 
2013-09-07 10:31:47 AM
Is it just my family or does it happen to everyone? the one uncle that is paranoid about nsa reading emails is the same one with 50 search bar plugins and no virus scanner
 
2013-09-07 10:31:50 AM

Smoking GNU: I do that every few days or so. Love my Ccleaner.

Well, besides the Email encryption. I don't do anything on there worth encrypting, TBH.


Just send emails one word at a time, sure your friends would be annoyed, but so would the NSA.
 
2013-09-07 10:33:03 AM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Firefox with no script, adblocker, foxy proxy, and ghostery installed
SurfEasy with direct link to my computer at home for when I travel
Ccleaner and Malwarebytes run at regular intervals
"Acquired" material from trusted sources
TOR client installed on a blank VM running generic XP with no personal information on it
Using Linux Mint with a VM for gaming.
Truecrypt for my external drive and all my passwords are based off a rotating amalgamation system (4 base passwords with 4 iterations of each password, each subsection of my life - Fark, Amazon, Banking, etc - independant from the others to make a total breach more difficult and the only key I have is a txt file on my flashdrive saying what coding it is - "Gmail: 3A" - meaning third password, first iteration)

Can I get a gold star?


I'm impressed. I run Xubuntu, adblock, Tor browser, and truecrypt my personal/financial/medical on a seperate flashdrive also with a horrid password and also a text file. You sir get an A+. I am probably in C- range.
 
2013-09-07 10:35:02 AM
I'm pretty sure I've never said "I value my online privacy". If any of you really want to know what I'm doing online, feel free to spy on me. You'll see me playing Sims, checking out gay porn for the hot guys, and shopping. You might catch on to my fantasy football strategy or see a picture of me topless. But seriously, most of that stuff you can see without any covert operations.

The people who are worried about their online privacy are the old farts who think hackers are interested in their passwords for the email accounts they use to forward hospital jokes to their old friends and also fall for the "grandma I got arrested in Mexico" phone scam.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-09-07 10:35:10 AM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Firefox with no script, adblocker, foxy proxy, and ghostery installed
SurfEasy with direct link to my computer at home for when I travel
Ccleaner and Malwarebytes run at regular intervals
"Acquired" material from trusted sources
TOR client installed on a blank VM running generic XP with no personal information on it
Using Linux Mint with a VM for gaming.
Truecrypt for my external drive and all my passwords are based off a rotating amalgamation system (4 base passwords with 4 iterations of each password, each subsection of my life - Fark, Amazon, Banking, etc - independant from the others to make a total breach more difficult and the only key I have is a txt file on my flashdrive saying what coding it is - "Gmail: 3A" - meaning third password, first iteration)

Can I get a gold star?


Yes.
stjudemonroe.org
You earned it.
 
2013-09-07 10:40:16 AM
I'm so important that there must be 20 govt agencies and dozens of corporations dedicating entire departments to observe my every move. Yes, I'm sure there is an office filled with NSA reading my non- encrypted e-mail and studying my browset history.
 
2013-09-07 10:42:19 AM

b0rscht: Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago


You're preaching to the choir. The #1 privacy related thing you can do reasonably is run an ad blocker. I use an ad blocking hosts file. Kills most ads and tracking cookies, but makes the Fark squirrel unhappy. Also, I run my own mail server, because I'm an internet weirdo. But it does nothing for privacy because everyone else uses Google mail.
 
2013-09-07 10:43:13 AM

J. Frank Parnell: comhcinc: I don't say that. I really don't care. As other has said I don't do anything that I feel I need to protect.

Cool. I'll be over tomorrow morning to set up a camera in your living room. That is, unless you have something to hide.


Okay. Cool with me.
 
2013-09-07 10:51:22 AM
Americians?

Not the best place to make a typo, in the headline of the story.
 
2013-09-07 10:55:53 AM
having anonymous organizations know about my predilection for bizarre tastes in pornography titillates me.
 
2013-09-07 10:56:08 AM
People value their physical safety too but aren't inclined to do anything about that  either.  That's also damn stupid.  For the most part people just like to piss, moan and groan about things after they get pooch-screwed.  Personal responsibility has been given up to the government to take care of our safety.  Therein lies the problem underlying the erosion of our rights
 
2013-09-07 10:58:27 AM

Fano: Don't websites in Europe require cookies by law?


I think they're just required to 'warn' you that they use cookies.  Kind of pointless.
 
2013-09-07 11:01:03 AM
I just buy a new hard drive every month and toss the old one into a kiln for a day.
 
2013-09-07 11:06:59 AM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Firefox with no script, adblocker, foxy proxy, and ghostery installed
SurfEasy with direct link to my computer at home for when I travel
Ccleaner and Malwarebytes run at regular intervals
"Acquired" material from trusted sources
TOR client installed on a blank VM running generic XP with no personal information on it
Using Linux Mint with a VM for gaming.
Truecrypt for my external drive and all my passwords are based off a rotating amalgamation system (4 base passwords with 4 iterations of each password, each subsection of my life - Fark, Amazon, Banking, etc - independant from the others to make a total breach more difficult and the only key I have is a txt file on my flashdrive saying what coding it is - "Gmail: 3A" - meaning third password, first iteration)

Can I get a gold star?


Fark no. For someone who values his security so much you sure go out of your way to explain how it works.
 
2013-09-07 11:07:31 AM
or don't install Chrome
 
2013-09-07 11:11:42 AM

b0rscht: Encrypting your email? Sure, I can do that. And everyone I send this encrypted email to will not be able to read it. Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago. Try to get someone not familiar with encryption to "send their public key" sometime.


Step 1) Get a PGP package that works for you:  http://www.gnupg.org/

Step 2) Get Thunderbird:  http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/

Step 3) Get the Enigmail add-on for Thunderbird:  https://www.enigmail.net/

Step 4) Create a public/private pair of keys.

Step 5) Distribute these instructions and your public key,  and you're set.

Done. It isn't that hard.

(How/why did I find out, you might ask? Because someone once set me off by sending me an extremely sensitive financial document for review through email because was out of town that particular week.)
 
2013-09-07 11:14:56 AM
I wish to go on record in this thread as expressing contempt for the paranoia of people who utilize more security measures than I do, and for the stupidity of people who utilize fewer.
 
2013-09-07 11:16:47 AM

Useless Destruction of Exergy: through email because was out of town that particular week.)


yes, it appears the subject of your sentence was even stolen by the interlopers.
 
2013-09-07 11:19:25 AM
I don't do this because I don't care if anyone knows this crap.  There's not much useful on there.

And, I hate to say this, but I've now twice bought something from targeted ads. Hey, I didn't know Roger Waters was doing The Wall tour in Austin. Super glad I saw the ad.
 
2013-09-07 11:24:27 AM

poison_amy: I'm pretty sure I've never said "I value my online privacy". If any of you really want to know what I'm doing online... or see a picture of me topless.


How YOU doin?
 
2013-09-07 11:24:38 AM

cardex: Is it just my family or does it happen to everyone? the one uncle that is paranoid about nsa reading emails is the same one with 50 search bar plugins and no virus scanner


LOL this is so true.
 
2013-09-07 11:38:53 AM
s21.postimg.org
Actually, this gets around most of the news site's paywalls
Noscript takes care of most of the others.
 
2013-09-07 11:40:32 AM
Why don't I worry about my on-line privacy? Because there are 2 billion people who use the internet daily. The odds of someone choosing to snoop on me, out of those 2 billion other internet users, is so farking small as to be not worth worrying about. Stop being so farking paranoid people. And as others have noted, exactly what are they going to glean from my usage data if they did happen to get it?
 
2013-09-07 11:41:04 AM

J. Frank Parnell: b0rscht: Encrypting your email? Sure, I can do that. And everyone I send this encrypted email to will not be able to read it. Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago. Try to get someone not familiar with encryption to "send their public key" sometime.

Hushmail has integrated it. But naturally you still need both the sender and receiver to use it.


hushmail was compromised many years ago, it was one of if not the first to hand over keys
 
2013-09-07 11:46:28 AM
I'm not on the Internet, so I don't have these worries ....
 
2013-09-07 11:57:18 AM

Dinki: Why don't I worry about my on-line privacy? Because there are 2 billion people who use the internet daily. The odds of someone choosing to snoop on me, out of those 2 billion other internet users, is so farking small as to be not worth worrying about. Stop being so farking paranoid people. And as others have noted, exactly what are they going to glean from my usage data if they did happen to get it?


Ah, the if youve got nothing to hide youve got nothing to worry about argument.

The number of users on the internet is also irrelevant. There arent 2 billion people Americans checking out a copy of the Koran and a pressure cooker at the same time.
 
2013-09-07 12:05:22 PM
Fallout Boy:. There arent 2 billion people Americans checking out a copy of the Koran and a pressure cooker at the same time.


What?
 
2013-09-07 12:10:58 PM

comhcinc: Fallout Boy:. There arent 2 billion people Americans checking out a copy of the Koran and a pressure cooker at the same time.


What?


I'm sorry to interrupt, but I had exactly that same question.
 
2013-09-07 12:14:31 PM
I got into the habit of clearing out my cookies and IE cache nearly daily with a shredder years ago, when I discovered they pile up and can slow down my system. The shredder came in when I started reading about how deleted surfing histories can be recovered.

I don't encrypt e-mail because (1) the receiver needs to have a copy of the program and (2) I never use email for nefarious purposes. Besides, if I had anything worth encrypting, I figure professionals have powerful programs that can crack the code easily.

Besides, the receiver of an email needs to remember to clear it from his/her system also. Most systems just delete the mail by removing the header, which allows it to remain and be written over. Until then, it remains on your HD in readable form if you know what you're doing.

It always cracks me up when I hear of people getting caught cheating because they never bothered to remove their cell phone history of texts or emails sent and received from their significant other.

I've not tried anonymous surfing. I don't have enough information on it to determine if it's actually that safe. I do tend to keep valuable records on a removable drive that is removed when I'm just casually farting around on the Internet.

After downloading 'free' programs, I discovered the unwanted adds and add-ons many have hidden inside, many of which are not easy to remove even when you wipe the program. Now, I'm more careful and did get a powerful program remover.

I also stopped using Google as much, when I found posted search lists from users all over the place. No names mentioned, but it was disturbing to find Google kept and published the records. Later I found that Google keeps surfing records for a long time. When the mucked with the search process by requiring you to add the word porn to any adult material you wished to find, I located another search engine to use.

Even so, I'm now paranoid about deleting search histories from the thing because I can shred those on my system. (Overwrite 70 or 80 times.) However, I can't access their system and do the same. Usually, deleting traces from a search engine servers simply means the basic delete process, which can be recovered.

Way back when the Internet popped up and kids started writing annoying viruses for fun, I realized that the technology could be heavily abused by computer savvy people -- and it has been.

I'm getting tired of having to wipe SPAM from my emails, having to be cautious about which interesting emails to open because one dumped a virus on my system that was a biatch to remove and I wasn't happy to discover those which add their addresses to my address list without my knowledge.

Now, I run automatic programs at startup that clean my system, but discovered that no one product gets everything, so I have several. One of the best products unfortunately clogged my system so much that it slowed it way down 'protecting' me, so I had to remove it -- and found that doing so was a real pain in the arse. Uninstallers, I found, do not necessarily remove everything.

It actually startled me when I discovered just how much information can be skimmed off cell phones by law enforcement and how some have GPS systems that can't be actually turned off. The company can turn it on to track your phone unless you're smart enough to go inside and physically disable it.
 
2013-09-07 12:15:23 PM
There are ads on the internet? I've been using ad blockers, script zappers et al for so long I'm surprized when I use someone else's computer and see all that crap.

It'll take a year or so for the tech community to catch it's breath but in the long term we'll be using a lot more open source technologies in the future thanks to this week's revelations.

Of course, given that it was established that the NSA was inserting people into telcos and software firms to add backdoors that would make it into commercial products, I'd imagine there's going to be some anguished attempts at salvaging existing products but given that the encryption standards themselves appear to have been compromised, and certifications themselves are now not trustable, there's nothing we can roll back to that predates the NSA's computer compromising program that's been going on for at least ten years.

Let's put it another way, if the NSA's budget is $25 billion per year, and they've been at it for ten years, they've got a heck of a head start.

Years ago, a famous computer scientist named Ken Thompson told a story at his Turing Award acceptance speech, about how he built a back door into a C compiler. The compiler would put back doors into the Unix login program, and it would even install the ability to insert those backdoors into new C compilers that it was used to build.The result of this was a system that would withstand code audits. Someone could look at all of the lines of code in the login program, as well as in the compiler, and think there were no backdoors.
 
2013-09-07 12:27:01 PM

comhcinc: Fallout Boy:. There arent 2 billion people Americans checking out a copy of the Koran and a pressure cooker at the same time.


What?


I am saying that agencies like the NSA doesnt spy on 2 billion people at the same time. It doesnt work that way. They have filters, so only the communications that are really suspicious get their attention. Unless there are 2 billion internet users that talk about bombs and the president in their emails daily, if you do anything they think is suspicious, they will monitor you.
 
2013-09-07 12:29:11 PM
just watch HBO's documentary called "the wire".  It has all of the info you need.
 
2013-09-07 12:32:37 PM
The NSA seen laughing at subby's suggestions.
 
2013-09-07 12:37:56 PM

Useless Destruction of Exergy: b0rscht: Encrypting your email? Sure, I can do that. And everyone I send this encrypted email to will not be able to read it. Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago. Try to get someone not familiar with encryption to "send their public key" sometime.

Step 1) Get a PGP package that works for you:  http://www.gnupg.org/

Step 2) Get Thunderbird:  http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/

Step 3) Get the Enigmail add-on for Thunderbird:  https://www.enigmail.net/

Step 4) Create a public/private pair of keys.

Step 5) Distribute these instructions and your public key,  and you're set.

Done. It isn't that hard.

(How/why did I find out, you might ask? Because someone once set me off by sending me an extremely sensitive financial document for review through email because was out of town that particular week.)


oky i drunk the thunderburd what i do now again
 
2013-09-07 12:40:00 PM
im sure all my shiat is on a govt server somewhere but im pretty sure ill never give them a reason to go look at it.  i value my privacy from corporate intrusion more than govt.  i only get 2-3 spam emails a day and I use firefox, adblock and noscript just so it stays that way.  im also pretty damn tame in internet habits anyway.  i frequent maybe 10 sites with regularity and another 10 every so often.  why yes, im extremely boring.
 
2013-09-07 12:54:35 PM

albatros183: J. Frank Parnell: b0rscht: Encrypting your email? Sure, I can do that. And everyone I send this encrypted email to will not be able to read it. Even my tech savvy friends can't figure out PGP/GPG but who can blame them - this stuff should have been integrated seamlessly into email a long time ago. Try to get someone not familiar with encryption to "send their public key" sometime.

Hushmail has integrated it. But naturally you still need both the sender and receiver to use it.

hushmail was compromised many years ago, it was one of if not the first to hand over keys


From what I understand they have no way to decrypt the emails being sent, but what they have done in the past was send a java applet to certain specific users named in a court order that would send the user's passphrase back to hushmail and they'll give that to the DEA or whomever. But, they have free accounts that are almost throwaway anonymous accounts. So you can, if you like, sign up for an account through tor, always access it through tor, and send encrypted emails to other users who have done the same. If you're really paranoid you could encrypt a text file and add that as an attachment. I really don't see how that could be compromised and I don't see how they'd be able to identify you.
 
2013-09-07 12:55:53 PM

Fallout Boy: comhcinc: Fallout Boy:. There arent 2 billion people Americans checking out a copy of the Koran and a pressure cooker at the same time.


What?

I am saying that agencies like the NSA doesnt spy on 2 billion people at the same time. It doesnt work that way. They have filters, so only the communications that are really suspicious get their attention. Unless there are 2 billion internet users that talk about bombs and the president in their emails daily, if you do anything they think is suspicious, they will monitor you.


Oh............and?
 
2013-09-07 12:58:10 PM

gaslight: there's nothing we can roll back to that predates the NSA's computer compromising program that's been going on for at least ten years.


Try 40.
 
2013-09-07 01:03:37 PM
I do too. And would be very surprised if any of you could actually read this.
 
Displayed 50 of 109 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report