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(Daily Mail)   Mother of two is kicked out of McDonald's for injecting drugs into herself. FARK: It was insulin   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 84
    More: Stupid, Mcdonald, carmageddon, hard drugs, epipen, insulin  
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7523 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Sep 2013 at 5:02 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-06 08:34:07 AM  
The wife shoots her insulin every time we go *anywhere* to eat.

I just try to look somewhere else during the event.
 
2013-09-06 08:35:06 AM  

Angry Monkey: Actually, HR or a (good) manager would tell you to get over yourself.


Sorry, but if it requires you to partially disrobe and expose parts of your body which normally aren't acceptable to expose in an office environment (which in his case it did) then it's an issue.

And no, they wouldn't tell me to get over myself because I didn't say a word about it.

Comparing it to taking a pill or same sex marriage is just ridiculous.

Using a breast pump in the workplace might be a more apt comparison but even there the fight seems over getting employers to provide a private place for that to be done rather than forcing them to use a bathroom or allowing them to do it at their desks.
 
2013-09-06 08:43:36 AM  

gazerwolf: johncb76006: Her diabetes is so bad that she has to dose herself 4 times a day?
She goes to McDonalds and orders a Big Mac but has to dose herself before she eats it?
No sympathy for her.

Dude, it's Type 1 an autoimmune disease...diet doesn't cause it. Her body does not produce insulin. She has to dose herself before she eats anything with carbs....and you need a certain amount of carbs a day to live. (about 60 a meal) A Big Mac has around 40.

//Type 2 diagnosed in April
///Have to actually eat MORE than I did before diagnosed


I don't know who you're getting your medical advice from, but I have had Type 2 for a few years, and I have never heard of anyone being told to eat more. The whole point of diabetes is that your body can't process the carbs you eat, untreated, you end up literally pissing away calories. That's why it used to be called the "wasting disease".

One of the problematic aspects of diabetes drugs(and insulin for that matter), is that they often lead to weight gain, because they help your body process the sugars that they couldn't before(and store the result as fat). So if you went on drugs or insulin, and continued to eat the same amount, all other things being equal, you'd get fatter. And since body fat is often highly correlated with insulin resistance, in the long run, weight gain will make your diabetes worse.

Unless you were emaciated when you were diagnosed, most doctors would tell you(and the prevailing standard of care) would be to lose as much weight as you can, and that's most likely going to mean eating less not more.
 
2013-09-06 08:49:14 AM  

gazerwolf: johncb76006: Her diabetes is so bad that she has to dose herself 4 times a day?
She goes to McDonalds and orders a Big Mac but has to dose herself before she eats it?
No sympathy for her.

Dude, it's Type 1 an autoimmune disease...diet doesn't cause it. Her body does not produce insulin. She has to dose herself before she eats anything with carbs....and you need a certain amount of carbs a day to live. (about 60 a meal) A Big Mac has around 40.

//Type 2 diagnosed in April
///Have to actually eat MORE than I did before diagnosed




I don't think there is any definitive evidence that says you MUST consume carbs to survive, but you certainly don't need 60 grams per meal.

/boyfriend is type I, doctor's advice is to low carb it as much as possible
// turns out your body still makes sugars as a metabolism byproduct, so he has to take insulin no matter what
 
2013-09-06 08:58:18 AM  

gfid: Angry Monkey: Actually, HR or a (good) manager would tell you to get over yourself.

Sorry, but if it requires you to partially disrobe and expose parts of your body which normally aren't acceptable to expose in an office environment (which in his case it did) then it's an issue.

And no, they wouldn't tell me to get over myself because I didn't say a word about it.

Comparing it to taking a pill or same sex marriage is just ridiculous.

Using a breast pump in the workplace might be a more apt comparison but even there the fight seems over getting employers to provide a private place for that to be done rather than forcing them to use a bathroom or allowing them to do it at their desks.


He was injecting himself in the breast?  That's weird.  Most people use their stomach near their waistline, upper arm or upper leg.
 
2013-09-06 09:27:18 AM  
count_chimpula:
I don't know who you're getting your medical advice from, but I have had Type 2 for a few years, and I have never heard of anyone being told to eat more. The whole point of diabetes is that your body can't process the carbs you eat, untreated, you end up literally pissing away calories. That's why it used to be called the "wasting disease".

One of the problematic aspects of diabetes drugs(and insulin for that matter), is that they often lead to weight gain, because they help your body process the sugars that they couldn't before(and store the result as fat). So if you went on drugs or insulin, and continued to eat the same amount, all other things being equal, you'd get fatter. And since body fat is often highly correlated with insulin resistance, in the long run, weight gain will make your diabetes worse.

Unless you were emaciated when you were diagnosed, most doctors would tell you(and the prevailing standard of care) would be to lose as much weight as you can, and that's most likely going to mean eating less not more.


I get my advice from my doctor and nutritionist.  I was told 60 carbs a meal (three meals a day) and 15 carbs for snacks ( +/- 5 on those numbers). But what I mean by eatiing more is spreading my food intake out more over the day. I used to eat One big meal a day. (I just don't get that hungry)

Weight isn't a problem yet (at least my Doctor hasn't mentioned it.) My weight at my (currently frequent) Doctor visits has been steady.

My Nutritionist explained that if you don't spread your food intake over the day evenly, then your body takes what sugar you HAVE managed to store as fat and floods your blood thinking you need the stored sugar.
 
2013-09-06 09:31:04 AM  
pivazena:


I don't think there is any definitive evidence that says you MUST consume carbs to survive, but you certainly don't need 60 grams per meal.

/boyfriend is type I, doctor's advice is to low carb it as much as possible
// turns out your body still makes sugars as a metabolism byproduct, so he has to take insulin no matter what


http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/carb-co un ting/
 
2013-09-06 09:32:17 AM  

Abacus9: AverageAmericanGuy: yukichigai: zzrhardy: Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

It's medication, not expelling bodily fluids.  Tell someone with a kidney stone they can't take their painkillers in public too.

If they were inserting suppositories, absolutely.

That's not how kidney stones work.


Someone call me?

You don't have to worry about someone suffering a kidney stone taking meds in public because they're usually staying home hoping they'll die.

If you ever get a stone the worst thing you can do is stay still. Walk, run, jump, stomp, do anything you can to get it to move. Once I learned that the crazy pain has only lasted 15 minutes instead of hours. It hurts like hell to stomp around but so far the sumbiatch has moved enough to stop blocking.

The last one I passed was farking huge. It got . . . Stuck. A quart of water and two beers provided the necessary pressure.
 
2013-09-06 09:32:30 AM  

Abacus9: Insulin injections aren't a big deal, it's not like sticking yourself with a heroin needle.


The difference between an insulin needle and heroin needle is...?  _NOTHING_
 
2013-09-06 09:32:58 AM  

RedPhoenix122: Abacus9: 3) McDonald's would have customers who are diabetic.

Hah.  A good portion of people who are diabetic did it through poor diet.  Many people who are diagnosed with diabetes still continue to make poor diet decisions.  Case in point:  My wife's father will actually inject himself with extra insulin, just so he can eat more.


True only inasmuch as most diabetics have type 2 diabetes.
The lady in TFA has type 1 diabetes which is an autoimmune disease and has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle.
 
2013-09-06 09:34:01 AM  

FarknGroovn: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 306x423][www.magweb.com image 300x493]


Kind of looks like Tom Hanks to me.
 
2013-09-06 09:39:45 AM  
As someone who hates needles, no do you don't need to do it in the bathroom, but it can be done discretely.
 
2013-09-06 09:56:53 AM  

gazerwolf: pivazena:


I don't think there is any definitive evidence that says you MUST consume carbs to survive, but you certainly don't need 60 grams per meal.

/boyfriend is type I, doctor's advice is to low carb it as much as possible
// turns out your body still makes sugars as a metabolism byproduct, so he has to take insulin no matter what

http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/carb-co un ting/


Right... Dietary guidelines for adjusting to a life with (type two, from the looks of the links on the webpage) diabetes is not medical evidence that the human body NEEDS carbohydrates to survive.  People with type 2 generally (though not always) get it from very bad diet choices, so understanding your food intake, which you like haven't done before, is the first step to managing blood glucose.
 
2013-09-06 10:41:24 AM  

gfid: pedobearapproved: zzrhardy: 'Some friends were saying that I should have gone to the toilets or somewhere private to do my injections but that isn't the point.

'I don't see why I should have to do that when this is something that is a day-to-day experience for me

Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

She's not shooting up, she injecting a life saving fluid into herself. If she were swallowing an AZT pill would you biatch? No, no you wouldn't.

That's extremely different.   One of my friends used to inject himself with insulin at his desk before lunch everyday.  I never openly complained about it, but every time he did it I was just thinking "Dude, I don't want to see that."  If the wrong manager or HR person saw him do that, they would probably say something.

It makes people uncomfortable.  It's not the same as swallowing a pill to an observer.


If HR saw that, and heard your reaction, YOU would be the one getting a talking to.  People with diabetes are covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, so the company must make reasonable accommodations for them.  If HR has to choose between making you happy (because you're a prissy little douchebag who "doesn't want to see that," you precious little snowflake you), or making a diabetic happy so they don't sue the company for an ADA violation ... guess who's going home disappointed and whining on Fark about it?
 
2013-09-06 10:49:37 AM  
What, shooting up in public at a dinner table in a trashy fast food craphole wasn't covered in  The Amy Vanderbilt Complete Book of Etiquette?
 
2013-09-06 10:58:38 AM  

count_chimpula: gazerwolf: johncb76006: Her diabetes is so bad that she has to dose herself 4 times a day?
She goes to McDonalds and orders a Big Mac but has to dose herself before she eats it?
No sympathy for her.

Dude, it's Type 1 an autoimmune disease...diet doesn't cause it. Her body does not produce insulin. She has to dose herself before she eats anything with carbs....and you need a certain amount of carbs a day to live. (about 60 a meal) A Big Mac has around 40.

//Type 2 diagnosed in April
///Have to actually eat MORE than I did before diagnosed

I don't know who you're getting your medical advice from, but I have had Type 2 for a few years, and I have never heard of anyone being told to eat more. The whole point of diabetes is that your body can't process the carbs you eat, untreated, you end up literally pissing away calories. That's why it used to be called the "wasting disease".

One of the problematic aspects of diabetes drugs(and insulin for that matter), is that they often lead to weight gain, because they help your body process the sugars that they couldn't before(and store the result as fat). So if you went on drugs or insulin, and continued to eat the same amount, all other things being equal, you'd get fatter. And since body fat is often highly correlated with insulin resistance, in the long run, weight gain will make your diabetes worse.

Unless you were emaciated when you were diagnosed, most doctors would tell you(and the prevailing standard of care) would be to lose as much weight as you can, and that's most likely going to mean eating less not more.


"The whole point of diabetes is that your body can't process the carbs you eat" No, with diabetes your body can't REGULATE your body's blood sugar levels.  As a Type 2 for 15 years, high blood sugar isn't my only problem ... on occasion, I've been told to eat more to prevent hypoglycemia.  For some of us, keeping our sugar levels in a good range is a balancing act, not just a struggle to keep levels low enough.

Your claims about weight gain don't apply to everyone, either.  I actually LOST weight once I was diagnosed and treatment began.  In my case, the extra energy my body suddenly had access to as a result of carbs being processed properly actually raised my metabolism.  I was also smart enough to use that extra energy to exercise more.  If you begin treatment for diabetes without using exercise as part of your treatment program, excess weight is much more likely to be in your future.
 
2013-09-06 11:01:50 AM  

jimmiejaz: Abacus9: Insulin injections aren't a big deal, it's not like sticking yourself with a heroin needle.

The difference between an insulin needle and heroin needle is...?  _NOTHING_


My insulin needles are half an inch long and so thin as to be nearly invisible.  You're an idiot.
 
2013-09-06 11:18:02 AM  

RealFarknMcCoy2: Abacus9: AverageAmericanGuy: yukichigai: zzrhardy: Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

It's medication, not expelling bodily fluids.  Tell someone with a kidney stone they can't take their painkillers in public too.

If they were inserting suppositories, absolutely.

That's not how kidney stones work.

I beg to differ. I had a kidney stone last year which was so farking painful that I was vomiting to the point of dry heaves. I needed to take something for the pain, but could not take anything orally. Guess what I ended up (pun intended) having to do??


so you did that in public?
 
2013-09-06 11:53:29 AM  

Abacus9: A friend of mine from high school had type I diagnosed from when he was about 12, and said he was told he'd only live to about 50. So maybe it ages you physically, I don't know.


Our ambulance service has a "frequent flyer" in town who is a BAD diabetic. The first time I saw her I thought she was probably 80+. She's under 50. Anecdotal, I realize, but I've never seen anyone whose physical appearance was so out-of-line with their actual age.
 
2013-09-06 12:00:42 PM  

gfid: pedobearapproved: zzrhardy: 'Some friends were saying that I should have gone to the toilets or somewhere private to do my injections but that isn't the point.

'I don't see why I should have to do that when this is something that is a day-to-day experience for me

Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

She's not shooting up, she injecting a life saving fluid into herself. If she were swallowing an AZT pill would you biatch? No, no you wouldn't.

That's extremely different.   One of my friends used to inject himself with insulin at his desk before lunch everyday.  I never openly complained about it, but every time he did it I was just thinking "Dude, I don't want to see that."  If the wrong manager or HR person saw him do that, they would probably say something.

It makes people uncomfortable.  It's not the same as swallowing a pill to an observer.


I have to agree with you on this one. If it were an emergency or something where she couldn't make it to the restroom then, by all means, take your shot. Otherwise, please go to the restroom and do it in a stall. Most public restrooms anymore even have a sharps disposal container for just this reason. People who are trying to eat probably don't want to watch a complete stranger give themselves an injection.
 
2013-09-06 12:47:57 PM  

Molavian: It's the "mother of two" part of the headline I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around.


Obviously that should make us more enraged. Diabetus is too small a niche, they needed to appeal to a wider chunk of people. In the editor's mind someone is reading this and saying, "Well, I don't have diabetes so normally I would care but since we're both mothers I am outraged."
 
2013-09-06 12:57:17 PM  

mod3072: gfid: pedobearapproved: zzrhardy: 'Some friends were saying that I should have gone to the toilets or somewhere private to do my injections but that isn't the point.

'I don't see why I should have to do that when this is something that is a day-to-day experience for me

Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

She's not shooting up, she injecting a life saving fluid into herself. If she were swallowing an AZT pill would you biatch? No, no you wouldn't.

That's extremely different.   One of my friends used to inject himself with insulin at his desk before lunch everyday.  I never openly complained about it, but every time he did it I was just thinking "Dude, I don't want to see that."  If the wrong manager or HR person saw him do that, they would probably say something.

It makes people uncomfortable.  It's not the same as swallowing a pill to an observer.

I have to agree with you on this one. If it were an emergency or something where she couldn't make it to the restroom then, by all means, take your shot. Otherwise, please go to the restroom and do it in a stall. Most public restrooms anymore even have a sharps disposal container for just this reason. People who are trying to eat probably don't want to watch a complete stranger give themselves an injection.


No, they don't.

And again,  you two have the option to not be such unbelievable pussies.

/insulin vials are glass
//and can occasionally be dropped
///do you know what happens when you drop glass on a hard surface public bathroom floor?
////do you know how expensive/difficult it is to replace insulin in an emergency situation?
//the best thing for you to do would be to focus on un-knotting your panties so that way you won't have to look at the scary needles
 
2013-09-06 12:59:43 PM  
I am a Type 1 diabetic and a former heroin addict. Anyone who tells you the syringes are the same is ignorant, an idiot, or both. A person may need between 2 and 8 injections a day. And while I try to keep my injections on the DL in restaurants, the ones shooting me scuzzies occasionally get treated to the sight of me pricking a huge glob of blood out of my finger, adding salt and pepper, and licking it off with great relish.
 
2013-09-06 02:35:57 PM  

mod3072: gfid: pedobearapproved: zzrhardy: 'Some friends were saying that I should have gone to the toilets or somewhere private to do my injections but that isn't the point.

'I don't see why I should have to do that when this is something that is a day-to-day experience for me

Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

She's not shooting up, she injecting a life saving fluid into herself. If she were swallowing an AZT pill would you biatch? No, no you wouldn't.

That's extremely different.   One of my friends used to inject himself with insulin at his desk before lunch everyday.  I never openly complained about it, but every time he did it I was just thinking "Dude, I don't want to see that."  If the wrong manager or HR person saw him do that, they would probably say something.

It makes people uncomfortable.  It's not the same as swallowing a pill to an observer.

I have to agree with you on this one. If it were an emergency or something where she couldn't make it to the restroom then, by all means, take your shot. Otherwise, please go to the restroom and do it in a stall. Most public restrooms anymore even have a sharps disposal container for just this reason. People who are trying to eat probably don't want to watch a complete stranger give themselves an injection.


I eat out every week with a friend who must take insulin before every meal. Most of the time I am not squeamish about it, but sometimes it just bothers me to watch her jab herself with that needle. You know what I do then? I look the other way. Get over yourself.
 
2013-09-06 02:55:09 PM  

Mirandized: I eat out every week with a friend who must take insulin before every meal. Most of the time I am not squeamish about it, but sometimes it just bothers me to watch her jab herself with that needle. You know what I do then? I look the other way. Get over yourself.


I would give the woman in the article the same advice. And I'm not squeamish around needles. That doesn't mean I want to look at it while I'm eating. And yes, I can look away. The mother can also go somewhere at least semi-private. I'm not at all surprised, however, that the Fark Entitlement Brigade can't understand how if a single person's actions are disruptive to others, then maybe they should modify their behavior slightly. You are, after all, individual and precious little snowflakes and the rest of the world should do whatever is necessary to accommodate you and your special needs.

Cargo: /insulin vials are glass
//and can occasionally be dropped
///do you know what happens when you drop glass on a hard surface public bathroom floor?
////do you know how expensive/difficult it is to replace insulin in an emergency situation?
//the best thing for you to do would be to focus on un-knotting your panties so that way you won't have to look at the scary needles


As opposed to the plush carpet on the floor in the eating area of a McDonald's? Unless it's an emergency, take care of your private matters in private.
 
2013-09-06 03:21:48 PM  
As a type 1 Diabetic for the last 31 years I must say that I to will take my insulin in public areas.  I do however try to conceal it as much as possible so as to not possibly offend anyone.

/never been tossed from a restaurant
//also never been even looked at funny for it
///don't care what the nay sayers think, I have had this problem since I was 8 years old
 
2013-09-06 03:23:33 PM  
All of you squeamish, whining complainers need to stop producing insulin in public, it makes me sick to see you do that.
 
2013-09-06 05:59:35 PM  

johncb76006: Her diabetes is so bad that she has to dose herself 4 times a day?
She goes to McDonalds and orders a Big Mac but has to dose herself before she eats it?
No sympathy for her.


And that just proves that you are no more knowledgeable than the McDonald's staff.

She is a type 1.  That means her body does not produce insulin (it also means that here diabetes is not the result of an unhealthy diet.  That's type 2)... so yes, 4 times a day is pretty standard.  Before every meal, and before bed, is typically what a type 1 diabetic has to deal with every day.  You can't eat a meal without injecting or you fark up your blood sugar... it doesn't matter if it's a Big Mac or a salad.

//dad is a type 1 diabetic
 
2013-09-06 09:05:28 PM  

It is known: If HR saw that, and heard your reaction, YOU would be the one getting a talking to.  People with diabetes are covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, so the company must make reasonable accommodations for them.  If HR has to choose between making you happy (because you're a prissy little douchebag who "doesn't want to see that," you precious little snowflake you), or making a diabetic happy so they don't sue the company for an ADA violation ... guess who's going home disappointed and whining on Fark about it?


Well, as I stated a few times in this thread, there was no reaction from me to hear because I never said anything.  I'd walk over to my friend's cube and ask if he wanted to go to lunch, to which he'd usually reply "Sure, just hold on a minute" and then he'd pull out his test kit and then take out a needle, untuck his shirt and jab himself in his backside (not his stomach, and no, not his tits).

You're goddammed right I don't want to see that, but I was reasonably accommodating to him and I'd just turn away.  Sorry, I have an aversion to seeing needles stuck in people.

I don't want to see my female coworkers insert fresh tampons either, but that's a legitimate medical need too.  Are you saying they should be allowed to do that in a restaurant like McDonald's in the public dining area as well?

Yes, the ADA requires reasonable accommodations.  We have different ideas of what is reasonable.  I can silently disapprove of something without complaining to HR about it.

Call me names.  Call me a "prissy little douchebag" if it makes you feel better.  If I ever own a farking restaurant I'm going to tell anybody who has to jab themselves with a needle or breastfeed or change their tampon to take it somewhere more private and I will make no apologies for it and if you want to sue me for that policy all I have to say is "Bring it on."

And no, I don't think my friend would have sued them if he had been told to shoot up in the bathroom instead of his cube.  He might have been a bit pissed off, but he also didn't go out of his way to make a huge display of it either.  Sorry, the real world doesn't always lay down just because you have a problem.  The key word in the ADA is reasonable.
 
2013-09-06 09:14:24 PM  
I'll jump on the agree bandwagon. While I'm somewhat okay with the sight, there are people who faint at the sight of needles. Injecting yourself, breastfeeding*, using suppositories, and other private matters need to be done in private, whether it's in your car, home, changing room, or restroom. If you're not going to use manners and common sense, then you're going to run into shiat like this. No one wants to watch your private toilet routine.

*I guess I'm okay with using a cover in public
 
2013-09-07 03:07:44 AM  

KidneyStone: Abacus9: AverageAmericanGuy: yukichigai: zzrhardy: Yeah, shiatting, pissing, showering, shaving, cleaning my ears and nose is a day to day experience for me. Doesn't mean I can do them in public.

It's medication, not expelling bodily fluids.  Tell someone with a kidney stone they can't take their painkillers in public too.

If they were inserting suppositories, absolutely.

That's not how kidney stones work.

Someone call me?

You don't have to worry about someone suffering a kidney stone taking meds in public because they're usually staying home hoping they'll die.

If you ever get a stone the worst thing you can do is stay still. Walk, run, jump, stomp, do anything you can to get it to move. Once I learned that the crazy pain has only lasted 15 minutes instead of hours. It hurts like hell to stomp around but so far the sumbiatch has moved enough to stop blocking.

The last one I passed was farking huge. It got . . . Stuck. A quart of water and two beers provided the necessary pressure.


Yeah, I posted that having had experience with the bastards.  I dunno about the moving around, but I sure felt better upright than I did laying down.  Gravity helps a little, I guess.

Also, Flomax is a godsend.  That li'l bastard was refusing to move more than a few centimeters a day until the doc put me on that stuff.  That put some pep in its step, so to speak.

Anyway, whoever-it-was's suppository example is a nice strawman, in the sense that it involves a risk of getting fecal matter on things and also would almost necessarily involve showing your private bits to anybody who cares to watch.  Insulin injections on the other hand can be done virtually anywhere: arm, leg, belly, whatever.  Hell, if your forearm is up to it you might not even have to roll up your sleeves to administer your own insulin.
 
2013-09-07 04:17:32 AM  
What ever happened to "Mind your own farking business?"
 
2013-09-07 04:43:27 PM  

It is known: jimmiejaz: Abacus9: Insulin injections aren't a big deal, it's not like sticking yourself with a heroin needle.

The difference between an insulin needle and heroin needle is...?  _NOTHING_

My insulin needles are half an inch long and so thin as to be nearly invisible.  You're an idiot.


Actually, if you can tell me which is for heroin and which is for insulin, I'll give you a cookie. Here's a hint, they're one in the same, as given out in pretty much every needle exchange program in North America.

So while you may think of me as an idiot, the hundreds of people I hand out needles to shoot their heroin, cocaine, and the like may disagree and actually consider  you an ill-informed asshole.
image.made-in-china.com
 
2013-09-07 06:30:26 PM  
Insulin injectors are actually pretty discreet- small tube, short needle, can pretty much be hidden in your hand. It isn't as if she had a rubber hose tied around her upper arm and was cooking up her insulin in a spoon at the table. Maybe it was dropping trou to inject in her upper gluteus that upset people.
 
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