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(LA Times)   3% of Americans still use dial-up Internet service. Apparently if AOL was good enough back in 1998, why change now?   (latimes.com) divider line 21
    More: Strange, dial-up Internet, Pew Research Center, internet, Americans, internet service  
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414 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Sep 2013 at 8:33 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-09-05 11:21:37 AM
2 votes:
In with the "rural" crowd. There are some small towns (I'm thinking in bayou Louisiana and bog Florida) that got wired for telephone in the 1990s.  Now, since those places currently have electric and telephone lines but nothing else, I'd say that 3% market sounds about right for a few niche businesses.
2013-09-06 12:59:05 AM
1 votes:
My wife's parents (ages 78 and 81) still have aol dialup. They live on a small income and broadband is just more expensive. But as she only checks email occasionally, which is mostly either spam or teabagger derp emails from even older relatives, they just don't care that much.

It's just insane that broadband costs more than dial up-even the cheapest broadband tier available here.
2013-09-05 02:14:30 PM
1 votes:

Meatschool: The fact that I couldn't bear going back to being in that 3% is the sole reason I've been fighting with Verizon over my shiatty DSL connection that the refuse to troubleshoot yet continue to bill me full price for... blah.  The only other option in the area is cellular data ($$) or Comcast, but oh wait, I'm 8/10ths of a mile too far away to hook me up.

/fark verizon


I think the ISP market could stand for a big dose of truth in advertising.  This whole "pay for up to 100MB/s, get 1 MB/s" garbage really needs to stop.

As a farker said in a thread a few days ago, it's like going into a restaurant, ordering surf and turf, and getting a hot dog and a Filet-O-Fish.  And when the bill comes, you get charged for the surf and turf, because hey, that's what you ordered, isn't it?
2013-09-05 01:31:42 PM
1 votes:
The fact that I couldn't bear going back to being in that 3% is the sole reason I've been fighting with Verizon over my shiatty DSL connection that the refuse to troubleshoot yet continue to bill me full price for... blah.  The only other option in the area is cellular data ($$) or Comcast, but oh wait, I'm 8/10ths of a mile too far away to hook me up.

/fark verizon
2013-09-05 12:57:57 PM
1 votes:

Burr: ZAZ: Providing internet is not cost effective and there is no effective government mandate for universal service.

If I had the time and money I would seriously like to research some way to make cost effective rural internet.  Maybe some sort of co-op, or invest in new tech.  There has got to be a way out there and I feel like just nobody is really trying because it only effects about 25% of the population.


That wouldn't work in North Carolina. TW and AT&T would pay off the state house to make it illegal, just like they did when municipals started was offering 100MB/s ftth for $45/month and they collectively shiat their pants.
2013-09-05 12:52:24 PM
1 votes:
I live just north of Charlottesville (I have a high-speed InterWebs connect), but about half of my county is still forced to choose either between dial-up (not even DSL) or satellite.
2013-09-05 12:03:45 PM
1 votes:

mod3072: Some people don't sit in front of their computer 20 hours a day commenting on Fark, watching porn cat videos and updating their Facebook status. If all you want to do is check your email or get a weather update once in a while, dial-up is sufficient.


Not really.  My parents don't do that and it's pretty frustrating for me to update their system when I go home.  Some of those windows updates are over 100 mb, which is way too big for dialup to download within a reasonable amount of time.  Plus every day, you have updates to malewarebytes, antivirus, emails (with embedded graphics, picture attachments, etc.).  Dialup is just way too slow.  But like I said, my folks are not very computer savvy so if they ever get broadband, I dunno what kind of trouble they will get themselves into.
2013-09-05 11:58:28 AM
1 votes:

buzzcut73: The lines are there already. The technology mostly exists to send high speed data over said existing lines.


Depending on your definition of 'high speed data'.  Besides the whole radio emissions complaints  dittybopper mentions, none of the tests so far, with some pretty advanced coding/detection methods, have reliably gotten more than about 2 Mbps (shared) over even a two mile segment.  The satellite providers, for all their suck, do at least as well.
2013-09-05 11:47:52 AM
1 votes:

buzzcut73: So: The lines are there already. The technology mostly exists to send high speed data over said existing lines.


The problem with that idea is that it's noisy.  It spews RF all over the place.  They can filter it, somewhat, but the problem doesn't go away completely:

The second major issue is Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) with main parameters the signal strength and operating frequency. The system was expected to use frequencies of 10 to 30 MHz in the High Frequency (HF) range, which has been used for many decades by a variety of communications systems (military, aeronautical, amateur radio, etc.) and by international and regional shortwave broadcasters. Power lines are unshielded and will act as antennas for the signals they carry, and they will cause interference to high frequency radio communications and broadcasting.
2013-09-05 11:38:01 AM
1 votes:

EvilEgg: High Speed internet is still not available everywhere in the US and satellite internet sucks balls.  I suspect that is the reason.

/Note: I am actually pro ball sucking


Not only that but Medicare still uses dial up to send/receive claims.
2013-09-05 11:32:04 AM
1 votes:
You mean there are some people whose lives don't revolve around the internet and following the minutiae of vapid e-friends at high speed!?!? Barbarians!
2013-09-05 11:24:21 AM
1 votes:
That number should decrease as the incumbent telcos get permission to drop those pesky expensive rural copper pairs.  Then, it's 2GB/month cell service (if you get it) or getting out the ol' CB radio.
2013-09-05 11:14:28 AM
1 votes:
I have a property (not my home) that is 1/2 mile from the nearest cable drop. Vios is not available. High speed internet is not an option unless I want to pay $10,000 for them to run the cable down my road (I'm the only property back there). There's very weak cell signal, and on a GOOD day I get the "E" indicating I'm on the edge of the network.

I do have copper, and for $12 a month I can have unlimited dial up service there. I'm not watching youtube videos, but it does allow me to check my email and do basic surfing while I'm away from my home.
2013-09-05 10:58:25 AM
1 votes:
I have an older relative who just won't give up their dialup for roadband. They cite the difficulty of cancelling the service, even when I offer to cancel it for them. So along with the people who live in rural areas that can't get broadband I bet a big part of the group are older people.

I don't miss dialup. Taking 20 minutes to download a picture of a nude woman an MP3 was painful.
2013-09-05 10:57:38 AM
1 votes:
Up until late 2003, I lived in Gary, Indiana, where my best option was using three modems and three phone lines to achieve an aggregate connection of 28.8kpbs (3x the federally mandated minimum 9.6k dialup speed). I actually had to specifically tell my ISP's tech guys what to do to configure their RAS to work with that kind of connection. I was paying over $100 a month for a connection I could have had in 1993 if I lived someplace with a decent telecommunications infrastructure.

Anyway, it would in no way shock me if there were still places even in relatively urban environments where for one reason or other the infrastructure just doesn't support high speed connectivity of any sort.
2013-09-05 10:54:32 AM
1 votes:
Until about 8 years ago I had dialup. Reasons being  I was lazy and it was free. The company I had gotten it through years before had been, bought , sold and merged so many times I was just forgotten. So hey free dialup.
2013-09-05 09:53:32 AM
1 votes:
My parents do because they are cheap.  Plus I'm not sure it would be a good thing for their computers to be connected to the net 24/7.  They aren't exactly computer savvy.
2013-09-05 09:34:20 AM
1 votes:

Burr: If I had the time and money I would seriously like to research some way to make cost effective rural internet. Maybe some sort of co-op, or invest in new tech. There has got to be a way out there and I feel like just nobody is really trying because it only effects about 25% of the population.


Out here we have a company called Roadstar Internet. They use a wireless system that allows an antenna (say, on one house or a tall building) to serve a cluster of houses spread out over several acres. That antenna uses a form of directional Wifi and potentially a couple of hops to a more powerful antenna that in turn connects to a tower up on the Blue Ridge where it goes to ground. I had their service for several years and was very happy with it, before Comcast eventually laid cable out to my neighborhood. Both the installation cost and the service cost were very reasonable.

There's a bunch of other small local outfits doing similar things across the rural parts of Virginia and West Virginia, but I don't if it would work for the much wider open spaces out west.
2013-09-05 09:26:27 AM
1 votes:

ArkPanda: We still have a few dialup customers, mainly people who just want to check email once a day and look at pictures of their grandkids.  It's also useful as a final, final backup if the more complicated systems fail in a disaster and you need to communicate.


No, the final, final backup is ham radio.  Because unlike almost every other communication method you can think of, it doesn't require any infrastructure to work.

So long as you've got some form of electricity (batteries, solar, car, generator, etc.), and you can put an antenna of some kind up, you can communicate.

And yes, you can send pictures, data, and e-mails, etc. over ham radio:   WINLINK.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-09-05 08:43:13 AM
1 votes:
The house I lived in when I was 0 is too far from the switch to get high speed phone service and I don't think it's been hooked up with cable. It's on a dirt road with 3-5 houses along several miles. Providing internet is not cost effective and there is no effective government mandate for universal service.
2013-09-05 08:10:49 AM
1 votes:
High Speed internet is still not available everywhere in the US and satellite internet sucks balls.  I suspect that is the reason.

/Note: I am actually pro ball sucking
 
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