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(The Onion)   "Ariel Castro Failed By System"   (theonion.com) divider line 78
    More: Satire, Ariel Castro, prison reform, legal system, rethinks, criminal justice system  
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7558 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Sep 2013 at 8:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-05 10:43:34 AM
The girls that he kidnapped and kept locked up as sexual playthings and tortured for years should have been allowed to beat him to death with hammers on live TV. While wearing bikinis. Sponsored by Home Depot.

/America!
 
2013-09-05 10:46:33 AM
But wait...   maybe I am comparing them, they are both exactly what I said, treatment in response to action, the difference is only in quantity/intensity  (what's the word I'm looking for here...)  maybe I answered my own question.  But who determines what is the proper amount of punishment before it becomes revenge?  We do I suppose.  Doesn't that make revenge versus punishment subjective?
 
2013-09-05 10:48:46 AM

Slybri: The girls that he kidnapped and kept locked up as sexual playthings and tortured for years should have been allowed to beat him to death with hammers on live TV. While wearing bikinis. Sponsored by Home Depot.

/America!


Now this I agree with, except have you seen the photos of the victims, (no offense ladies) perhaps they could get some cheerleaders to be proxy for them.
 
2013-09-05 10:51:24 AM
Apropos of nothing, one distinction I have heard made between "revenge" and "justice" is that if you want to see punishment done for a wrong that was not done to you personally, you're out for justice. If the wrong was done to you or yours, you're out for revenge.
 
2013-09-05 10:57:46 AM

rkettens: AverageAmericanGuy: One step towards a just society is the separation of revenge from punishment.

His punishment was to live the rest of his natural life in prison. Whether this was excessive is certainly up for debate. Could he have been rehabilitated? Could he have been forced to recompense the girls? Whatever the case, the final judgment was that he would live the rest of his life behind bars away from society.

What many want, though, is revenge for the horrors that he inflicted upon these women. Daily anal rape. Daily beatings. The death penalty by painful means. All of it is driven by the misguided concept of "victims' rights"; that there is something to be gained by forcing upon the monster the legal monstrosities and unlimited viciousness of government. This is satisfying but ultimately brutish and unbecoming of a society that believes itself enlightened and law-bound.

Castro took his life. In this way he has paid the ultimate price for his crime. Putting him in jail for the rest of his life is essentially the same as taking his life, the only question being the duration of the sentence. With Castro dead, justice is served, as that was the ultimate goal of his sentence.

Isn't all punishment revenge? and what is wrong with that?  Seriously I am asking, I have always wondered why people believe they are necessarily different.  Even the most lenient punishment is treatment of the perpetrator in response to his actions that are disagreed with.  Isn't that revenge?


No, they are not the same, although in many systems they have certainly become so. Especially so in systems that emphasize "victim's rights".

An example of a non-revenge punishment, a parent punishes a child to teach and mold the behavior of that child. The purpose (hopefully) isn't to exact revenge on the child for the bad behavior.

It's role is to shape behavior. Incarceration is one way to do that. The death penalty is an extreme example of this. But even in the death penalty, the punishment is not in place to assuage the pain of the victims but rather to inflict upon the person the most severe form of punishment possible in a dignified manner.

Revenge insinuates an equal act of retribution on the criminal, and if it cannot be at the hands of the victim, then the government must take the victim's place. However the act of punishment is almost never equal to the crime. It is tempered by the criminal's situation, not the victim's, and the government (through the judicial system) can determine the proper punishment. Through this manner of justice dealing, the desire for revenge of the victims can be ignored completely and the most fitting punishment be chosen for the criminal.
 
2013-09-05 10:59:17 AM
We should be trying to find the neurological causes & cures for these sorts of behaviors.  Ariel Castro was failed by the system.  The system sucks shiat.
 
2013-09-05 11:01:25 AM
He sort of was, at the very end. He'd talked about killing himself, so he should have been on suicide watch. That's just about the only way the system really failed him, though.

As it stands, we've lost an opportunity to study people like him, which is a waste. But he was the one with the agency there, not the system.
 
2013-09-05 11:17:39 AM

Teaser: Satire?  Maybe.  Funny?  Definitely not.


Serious question, does satire need to be funny?
 
2013-09-05 11:22:13 AM
It's almost not funny. Because yeah, lots of it is true.

But it's difficult for me to feel any sadness about this particular case.

Jeez, you imprison and repeatedly rape 3 young women for 10 years, and that's the only thing people remember about you.
 
2013-09-05 11:26:44 AM

Millennium: He sort of was, at the very end. He'd talked about killing himself, so he should have been on suicide watch. That's just about the only way the system really failed him, though.

As it stands, we've lost an opportunity to study people like him, which is a waste. But he was the one with the agency there, not the system.


I'll give you the scoop on him, for free: he was a selfish asshole who thought of most (doable) women as nothing more than a sex doll to be used and then put away like you'd use your toothbrush or the lawn mower. He deluded himself that he actually cared about them, because he "kept" them, rather than raping and then murdering them like a common criminal. He "loved" them. They were his "wives." They just didn't understand that. Nobody understands how much he really cared. That's why he killed himself. Because the world is so cruel and narrow-minded. And, the whole, you know, life in prison thing.
 
2013-09-05 11:30:08 AM
Came for people who feel the Onion had left humor behind. Leaving both disappointed and satisfied since I found them.
 
2013-09-05 11:34:19 AM
The only way the system "failed" him is if he didn't go out with a tingling sphincter.
 
2013-09-05 11:48:22 AM
I guess he really didn't like captivity.
 
2013-09-05 11:56:06 AM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Millennium: He sort of was, at the very end. He'd talked about killing himself, so he should have been on suicide watch. That's just about the only way the system really failed him, though.

As it stands, we've lost an opportunity to study people like him, which is a waste. But he was the one with the agency there, not the system.

I'll give you the scoop on him, for free: he was a selfish asshole who thought of most (doable) women as nothing more than a sex doll to be used and then put away like you'd use your toothbrush or the lawn mower. He deluded himself that he actually cared about them, because he "kept" them, rather than raping and then murdering them like a common criminal. He "loved" them. They were his "wives." They just didn't understand that. Nobody understands how much he really cared. That's why he killed himself. Because the world is so cruel and narrow-minded. And, the whole, you know, life in prison thing.


I don't dispute any of what you said, but there's a serious disconnect between your first sentence and the remainder. Lots of jerks treat "most (doable) women" as dolls, and they are d-bags of a very high order. But even among these, there are degrees: the overwhelming majority of them still wouldn't take captives. So why did he? When and how did he step over the line, transforming from a schmuck to a monster? That's the part that's really in need of study.
 
2013-09-05 12:01:35 PM

Sharksfan: Barfmaker: I have no opinion on it, but it's such a consistent reaction that I can't help but notice it.

I'm anti-death penalty in the vast majority of cases.  If there isn't concrete physical evidence - and I mean clear video or something of that nature, or the fact that they found three girls in this guys house - I'm against it.  There's just too many instances where it has been applied incorrectly or unjustly.

In this case, I would have been in favor.


I'm of the opinion that a person, who has been found guilty for a life sentence, with complete confidence that they truly were guilty, should be given the option of either life in prison, or execution. Let them decide.

In addition, for those that choose to die over life in prison, make the execution as painless as possible, with no viewing of the execution by any parties not involved in the process, meaning no family members of the victim, etc. I don't think reopening old wounds by seeing the convicted again as they die will do anything but reopen old wounds, or cause anger at the convicted dying in a merciful manner. No matter what the convicted did, we should hold ourselves to higher standards, and should they choose death or life in prison, it should as painless as can be. In addition, no penalty or benefit can be offered to the convicted when they make their decision, based on that decision. Either life in jail, or death. No strings attached, no threats if they don't choose death or choose life, a simple choice. If they cannot decide at the moment, they may choose life in prison, but at a later point, should they decide they did want death after all, they can do so, and we will process it in a humane manner.

This would probably be the best choice for when it comes to the death penalty.
 
2013-09-05 12:02:31 PM
i.imgflip.com
 
2013-09-05 12:18:37 PM

Aussie_As: It's a pretty bizarre Onion article. It is very subtle in its humour while being pretty aggressive in its satire. A good proportion of those sentences in the Onion piece could have fit in a real mainstream story about some guy who was eventually found to be innocent but who had killed himself in prison meanwhile.



cdn.fd.uproxx.com
 
2013-09-05 12:32:17 PM
Ariel Castro is to be admired for his independence and self reliance.

In an age when people are only too happy to suck the teat of government welfare he eschewed taking a handout. Most people are content to sit around on their lazy arse all day but not him! He could have cost the taxpayers millions by sitting in prison for years living a life of ease. Instead of waiting for the government to fix all his problems he took care of it himself.

Way to man up Ariel! Too bad more people aren't like you.

 
2013-09-05 12:40:45 PM
Somewhere children just lost their father.

Will somebody PLEASE THINK OF THE CHILDREN!
 
2013-09-05 12:49:25 PM

Infobahn: Teaser: Satire?  Maybe.  Funny?  Definitely not.

Serious question, does satire need to be funny?


No, it can be for the purposes of making people think differently about a situation (e.g. "A Modest Proposal").
 
2013-09-05 02:33:41 PM
While Castro wouldn't qualify, except maybe if they established that he murdered one of the women's babies, there is considerable momentum that a conservative Republican as chairman of the senate and house judiciary committees could really grease the skids for capital punishment, clearing the path for those states that wanted to execute vicious, usually multiple, killers to do so.

None of these changes could be regarded as inherently unfair.  Examples are declaring states to be "competent" to carry out executions, so their means of doing so would not be nit-picked; moving death row appeals to the head of the federal docket for consideration; and limiting number and length of delays by any participants in the appeal.  Likewise prejudicial statements by appellate judges of their opposition to the death penalty at all should be automatic grounds for recusal.

Optimally, after conviction, no condemned should be on death row for more than five years before their sentence is carried out.  That is more than enough time to consider appeals, commutation and pardon.
 
2013-09-05 02:45:00 PM

asquian: Killing himself may be the only decent thing he's done in over a decade.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-05 02:51:32 PM

Johnny Bananapeel: asquian: Killing himself may be the only decent thing he's done in over a decade.

[i.imgur.com image 600x430] "I think he may have had some assistance."


I doubt it. Not that prisoners weren't falling all over themselves to become The Guy Who Got Ariel Castro, but there's no way that the guard-bribery bidding wars had time to reach their peak yet. If we assume the guards had any sense at all, they must have still been holding out.
 
2013-09-05 04:38:56 PM
I figure Ariel Castro was failed by whoever named him after a fairy and a Castro.

Puck:   What fools these mortals be.

Amen, Pookie, Amen.
 
2013-09-05 04:39:36 PM
Fidel: He's not one of ours.
 
2013-09-05 04:40:27 PM
Castro Street: Don't look over here, Bubba. He's not one of ours either.
 
2013-09-05 10:52:26 PM

mrEdude: anyone who thinks death is punishment obviously hasn't died before.
Those jail guards let that assfark off the hook, he beat em all. Kidnapping, rape- he gets away with it now, basically.


He didn't get away with anything. He's DEAD. He couldn't live with himself anymore. How is this "getting away" with ANYTHING? He ain't even "getting away" with breathing, or a thought.

I am completely baffled by this sentiment.
 
2013-09-06 08:26:13 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: One step towards a just society is the separation of revenge from punishment.

His punishment was to live the rest of his natural life in prison. Whether this was excessive is certainly up for debate. Could he have been rehabilitated? Could he have been forced to recompense the girls? Whatever the case, the final judgment was that he would live the rest of his life behind bars away from society.

What many want, though, is revenge for the horrors that he inflicted upon these women. Daily anal rape. Daily beatings. The death penalty by painful means. All of it is driven by the misguided concept of "victims' rights"; that there is something to be gained by forcing upon the monster the legal monstrosities and unlimited viciousness of government. This is satisfying but ultimately brutish and unbecoming of a society that believes itself enlightened and law-bound.

Castro took his life. In this way he has paid the ultimate price for his crime. Putting him in jail for the rest of his life is essentially the same as taking his life, the only question being the duration of the sentence. With Castro dead, justice is served, as that was the ultimate goal of his sentence.


This is a concept with which I have had difficulty for a long time- separating 'consequence' from 'revenge'.
Best I've been able to do is be aware of it, and try to keep in mind the consequences of someone else's actions or behavior have little or nothing to do with how I feel about it.

Not an easy thing to do...
 
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