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(The New York Times)   Surveillance changes behavior. Ceiling cat unavailable for comment   (bits.blogs.nytimes.com) divider line 18
    More: Obvious, casual dining, case study, fields of study, 39th state, behavioral economics, academic standards, National Catholic Reporter, cats  
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3683 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Sep 2013 at 9:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-09-05 02:46:41 AM  
3 votes:
Interesting subject regarding the effect of surveillance on employee theft and fraud.  Some thoughts:

Cause (FTA):
"Most of the restaurant industry pays its servers low wages and they depend on tips."

Effect (FTA):
"Employee turnover is high. In that environment, a certain amount of theft has long been regarded as a normal part of the business."

I find it telling that the emerging industry solution is draconian tactics to persuade a more beneficial outcome for the employer as opposed to improving wages for the employee.


FTA:
"Knowing they were being monitored, the servers not only pulled back on any unethical practices, but also channeled their efforts into, say, prompting customers to have that dessert or a second beer, raising revenue for the restaurant and tips for themselves."

As corporate capitalism has shown over decades, increased revenues for businesses do not translate to employee's benefits -only to business profits.  The beneficial effect of the surveillance to the employees was in the form of tips only and likely minimal at best.


It should be noted; an employee with good pay and benefits has little or no motivation for fraud and/or theft.

/The converse is also true.
GBB
2013-09-05 10:27:31 AM  
2 votes:
Surveillance changes behavior?   Isn't the the entire premise of creating an omnipotent god, or Santa Claus?
2013-09-06 01:37:57 AM  
1 votes:
Working in a drive thru liquor store has its dangers. Not long ago we had the cops visit and tell us we needed two more security cameras out the front - good advice one would think, number plates are helpful to investigations. Guess where the owner put the two new cameras - out the back in the storeroom and delivery area -> no increase in security, but when I wish to have a smoke or read the paper for a bit, I now have to go and hide behind the wine racks. Not because I am not allowed to do these things every now and then, but because the millionaire owner wastes many hours a week of his time fast forwarding through hours and hours of video to see what staff are up too and I just do not like being spyed on. So the cameras just made me sneakier and lowered my morale,
2013-09-05 07:43:12 PM  
1 votes:

Prophet of Loss: pounddawg: Prophet of Loss: Wangiss: Even with no "motivation," rich people steal, too.  There's greed.

That is the most succinct explanation of why Wall St. and our banking system is a cesspool that I have heard of late.

Greed could be considered a form of motivation.

True, but I qualify that motivation as "not even remotely justifiable" as a reason to steal.

If a homeless man steals my apple, I am angry but can understand as I have been hungry before. When the same apple is stolen by a man pushing an apple cart, I have no understanding of his actions. Why would someone who already has so much take what little I have?


media.onsugar.com
2013-09-05 06:49:42 PM  
1 votes:
It's simple capitalism. If there is something in it for them, they work hard for you. If not, they work for themselves.
2013-09-05 12:39:55 PM  
1 votes:
I actually handle a lot of CCTV footage (I work security for a major trucking company). The amount of bullshiat damage claims outside drivers have made resolved through our cameras are staggering. Employee theft is also always a problem. People are scum and will steal anything not nailed down. From your lunch, to pallets to actual farking freight.

If you run a business and don't have a CCTV system that works, you're a moron.

/every vow you break, every claim you stake I'll be watching you
2013-09-05 12:36:02 PM  
1 votes:
Frederick: "I find it telling that the emerging industry solution is draconian tactics to persuade a more beneficial outcome for the employer as opposed to improving wages for the employee."

... that's *always* the industry solution: whatever benefits the business owners.
Sometimes their plans align with good things for employees, sometimes they don't.  Mostly they don't care.
They generally don't even consider the impact on employees until they're figuring out how to deliver/spin the news.

e.g. pervasive monitoring being sold as "helping the employees succeed".
2013-09-05 12:16:32 PM  
1 votes:

Arsten: The problem is that it's easier for management to brand everyone a crook than it is to balance between the needs of the company and the respect of the employee. Basically, the true litmus of whether your employees are going to rob you deaf, dumb, and blind is the culture at the work place.


Ageed! 
Unfortunately it's that "easier for management" that is often the crux.  Being "Invested" helps but not just monetarily (i.e. paid OT or sales bonus etc.) if the people your working for are respectful and treat you like a human being rather then "just an employee" it makes a world of difference and this does go back to your comment on the culture at the work place.
I am not a fan of the constant surveillance and camera's everywhere mentality. Surveillance in areas where a crime may occur such as a cash register or a blind spot in a store or and entrance/exit way I can understand but more often once they get one system in it's often followed by another and then another and yet there never seems to be one watching those who are watching again bringing about the mistrust and even more so when the monitors are locked in the managers office or being watch by the owners from their homes.  I've seen and have been part of lawsuits that came from this and it's misuse by management (mostly from an employee's wardrobe Vs' camera angle and saved/posted images from it then from actual footage of an employee's theft or misconduct).
2013-09-05 11:55:54 AM  
1 votes:

pounddawg: Prophet of Loss: Wangiss: Even with no "motivation," rich people steal, too.  There's greed.

That is the most succinct explanation of why Wall St. and our banking system is a cesspool that I have heard of late.

Greed could be considered a form of motivation.


True, but I qualify that motivation as "not even remotely justifiable" as a reason to steal.

If a homeless man steals my apple, I am angry but can understand as I have been hungry before. When the same apple is stolen by a man pushing an apple cart, I have no understanding of his actions. Why would someone who already has so much take what little I have?
2013-09-05 11:43:11 AM  
1 votes:

Wangiss: Even with no "motivation," rich people steal, too.  There's greed.


That is the most succinct explanation of why Wall St. and our banking system is a cesspool that I have heard of late.
2013-09-05 11:35:48 AM  
1 votes:
2013-09-05 11:03:11 AM  
1 votes:
www.jcnot4me.com

What surveillance to change behavior looks like...
GBB
2013-09-05 10:49:26 AM  
1 votes:

IdBeCrazyIf: Frederick: I find it telling that the emerging industry solution is draconian tactics to persuade a more beneficial outcome for the employer as opposed to improving wages for the employee.

I do consulting work from time to time and on this one contract I was brought in to consult on designing and implementing a web filter. I offered a design and resultant set of policies but was told it wasn't strict enough. I mean I filtered out the usual you know violence, criminal stuff, proxy... you know typical stuff that could create a liability issue.

Anyway this client in particular said they wanted the internet locked down tighter than a drum and to only allow enough time to use it during their half hour breaks. I tried to explain to them that in this day and age it wouldn't change anything, people would just use their phones instead then and that very likely they would see productivity go down. They would have none of it, so I did what the customer wanted.

Sure enough, six months later they called me back in to change the policy to something much much looser.


I work as a dispatcher in law enforcement.  Our IT dept subscribes to WebSense and has it set to "China".  Their reasoning makes a little sense: they want us focused on answering 911 calls in a timely manner, don't want us to be distracted when calls for service pop up on our monitors, and management wants to limit liability when shat meets fan.   The only issues with this is that when we need legitimate access to sites, many times innocuous, it turns out to be blocked.  No one has any problems with social media being blocked, but it makes no sense that when we try to get onto a neighboring police department's website, it's blocked.   Heck, up until a few months ago, I was using Yahoo! Maps because they accurately shade different tax jurisdictions (used to determine law enforcement jurisdiction) on their maps.  Blocked, for no reason, and they refuse to unblock it.  We are forced to use Google Maps, which if you've ever noticed, randomly shade all over the place through random property lines for no apparent reason.  And, they suck at mapping addresses on numerically and directionally named highways.
2013-09-05 10:42:50 AM  
1 votes:

RTOGUY: Frederick: e noted; an employee with good pay and benefits has little or no motivation for fraud and/or theft

Not always true. My wife took over as head chef at a country club and it pays their servers not server wage which is less than minimum, or minimum wage, but an actual respectable wage plus tips. Many of the servers have worked there for 10 years or more because they can take home after taxes $700/week not including their cash tips or extra income from the banquets or wedding functions. The first thing she did when she got there was go through the old inventory sheets and found that people had been scamming entire cases of chicken wings, entire prime ribs, cases of wine etc. When she brought it up to the director of operations he said it had been like that since he had started and it was just how restaurants ran. She had the order codes changed so that servers couldn't do refunds or void items without management approval and she installed locks on the fridges and freezers and a camera to monitor the backroom. The result was that immediately the profits started trending up since the inventory makes sense and the food and beverage department actually turned a profit for the first time since it opened. Most people are honest but there will always be people that will see a case of wine as just a nice little extra for putting in that three hours of overtime or a box of chicken wings as payment for not having time to go to the grocery store before work.


Yes to all of that.  My uncle served at a country club and would bring home $6000 in December, $4000 most other months.  It's an excellent career if you know your wines and have the right demeanor.  The most skillful waitstaff can make even more than that.  Don't feel bad for a 60-year-old guy working the tables at a fancy restaurant.  He's made more money, eaten better food, and drank finer wine than most people ever will.

Even with no "motivation," rich people steal, too.  There's greed, there's "what can I get away with," and there's "look how clever I am!" And there's Marie Schrader.
2013-09-05 10:35:22 AM  
1 votes:

Frederick: e noted; an employee with good pay and benefits has little or no motivation for fraud and/or theft


Not always true. My wife took over as head chef at a country club and it pays their servers not server wage which is less than minimum, or minimum wage, but an actual respectable wage plus tips. Many of the servers have worked there for 10 years or more because they can take home after taxes $700/week not including their cash tips or extra income from the banquets or wedding functions. The first thing she did when she got there was go through the old inventory sheets and found that people had been scamming entire cases of chicken wings, entire prime ribs, cases of wine etc. When she brought it up to the director of operations he said it had been like that since he had started and it was just how restaurants ran. She had the order codes changed so that servers couldn't do refunds or void items without management approval and she installed locks on the fridges and freezers and a camera to monitor the backroom. The result was that immediately the profits started trending up since the inventory makes sense and the food and beverage department actually turned a profit for the first time since it opened. Most people are honest but there will always be people that will see a case of wine as just a nice little extra for putting in that three hours of overtime or a box of chicken wings as payment for not having time to go to the grocery store before work.
2013-09-05 10:29:06 AM  
1 votes:

IdBeCrazyIf: Frederick: I find it telling that the emerging industry solution is draconian tactics to persuade a more beneficial outcome for the employer as opposed to improving wages for the employee.

I do consulting work from time to time and on this one contract I was brought in to consult on designing and implementing a web filter. I offered a design and resultant set of policies but was told it wasn't strict enough. I mean I filtered out the usual you know violence, criminal stuff, proxy... you know typical stuff that could create a liability issue.

Anyway this client in particular said they wanted the internet locked down tighter than a drum and to only allow enough time to use it during their half hour breaks. I tried to explain to them that in this day and age it wouldn't change anything, people would just use their phones instead then and that very likely they would see productivity go down. They would have none of it, so I did what the customer wanted.

Sure enough, six months later they called me back in to change the policy to something much much looser.


But hey, two consulting fees.
2013-09-05 10:09:22 AM  
1 votes:
upload.wikimedia.org

Jeremy Bentham agrees.
2013-09-05 09:26:54 AM  
1 votes:
Wow, way to report on something we've known since 1791.
 
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