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(Gizmodo)   "Kids these days with their MyBooks and their iTubes ... why, back in my day we had rocks, and ... HEY, IT'S NOT TIME FOR MY MEDS YET .... "   (gizmodo.com) divider line 48
    More: Obvious, meds, technology change, GASP  
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3075 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Sep 2013 at 9:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-05 08:33:13 AM  
I'm oooooold! And I'm not happy! And I don't like things now compared to the way they used to be. All this progress -- phooey! In my day, we didn't have these cash machines that would give you money when you needed it. There was only one bank in each state -- it was open only one hour a year. And you'd get in line, seventeen miles long, and the line became an angry mob of people -- fornicators and thieves, mutant children and circus freaks -- and you waited for years and by the time you got to the teller, you were senile and arthritic and you couldn't remember your own name. You were born, got in line, and ya died! And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Life was simpler then. There wasn't all this concern about hy-giene! It my days, we didn't have Kleenex. When you turned seventeen, you were given the family handkerchief. ... It hadn't been washed in generations and it stood on its own ... filled with diseases and swarmin' with flies. ... If you tried to blow your nose, you'd get an infection and your head would swell up and turn green and children would burst into tears at the sight o' ya! And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Life was a carnival! We entertained ourselves! We didn't need moooovin' pitchurrrres. In my day, there was only one show in town -- it was called "Stare at the sun!" ... That's right! You'd sit in the middle of an open field and stare up at the sun till your eyeballs burst into flames! And you thought, "Oh, no! Maybe I shouldn't've stared directly into the burning sun with my eyes wide open." But it was too late! Your head was on fire and people were roastin' chickens over it. ... And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Progress?! Flobble-de-flee! In my day, when we were angry and frustrated, we just said, "Flobble-de-flee!" 'cause we were idiots and we didn't know what else to say! Just a bunch o' illiterate Cro-Magnons, blowin' on crusty handkerchiefs, waitin' in lines for our head to burst into flame and that's the way it was and we liked it!
 
2013-09-05 09:30:46 AM  
Just wait until we have VR...something along the lines of "Brainstorm".
 
2013-09-05 09:45:43 AM  
 
2013-09-05 09:52:03 AM  
You're upset about this? Then don't buy that shiat for your kids.
 
2013-09-05 10:12:01 AM  
shiat, in hindsight I wish my parents didn't buy an NES superpack and an Apple IIc. I learned to touch type before I learned to write. I spent summers indoors, and I didn't realize Battletoads were a big old impossible "fark you" until I was an adult. I hope I'll make any child of mine balance their console game time with a musical instrument or artistic medium, unlike my parents.
 
2013-09-05 10:13:36 AM  
Isn't this a repeat?
 
2013-09-05 10:16:16 AM  
I've got a MyBook. It's actually a pretty good backup drive:

www.maximumpc.com
 
2013-09-05 10:19:40 AM  

ajgeek: Isn't this a repeat?


Yeah, basically going back to Hesiod in Ancient Greece.
 
2013-09-05 10:22:00 AM  

Sybarite: I'm oooooold! And I'm not happy! And I don't like things now compared to the way they used to be. All this progress -- phooey! In my day, we didn't have these cash machines that would give you money when you needed it. There was only one bank in each state -- it was open only one hour a year. And you'd get in line, seventeen miles long, and the line became an angry mob of people -- fornicators and thieves, mutant children and circus freaks -- and you waited for years and by the time you got to the teller, you were senile and arthritic and you couldn't remember your own name. You were born, got in line, and ya died! And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Life was simpler then. There wasn't all this concern about hy-giene! It my days, we didn't have Kleenex. When you turned seventeen, you were given the family handkerchief. ... It hadn't been washed in generations and it stood on its own ... filled with diseases and swarmin' with flies. ... If you tried to blow your nose, you'd get an infection and your head would swell up and turn green and children would burst into tears at the sight o' ya! And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Life was a carnival! We entertained ourselves! We didn't need moooovin' pitchurrrres. In my day, there was only one show in town -- it was called "Stare at the sun!" ... That's right! You'd sit in the middle of an open field and stare up at the sun till your eyeballs burst into flames! And you thought, "Oh, no! Maybe I shouldn't've stared directly into the burning sun with my eyes wide open." But it was too late! Your head was on fire and people were roastin' chickens over it. ... And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Progress?! Flobble-de-flee! In my day, when we were angry and frustrated, we just said, "Flobble-de-flee!" 'cause we were idiots and we didn't know what else to say! Just a bunch o' illiterate Cro-Magnons, blowin' on crusty handkerchiefs, waitin' in lines for our head to burst into flame and that's the way it was and we liked it!


Ah, Dana Carvey. In my day, SNL meant something.
 
2013-09-05 10:29:57 AM  

ajgeek: Isn't this a repeat?


Only every year since forever.
 
2013-09-05 10:30:57 AM  
Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.
 
2013-09-05 10:36:09 AM  
How old is the picture for the article? A joystick with a cable? really?
 
2013-09-05 10:48:11 AM  

Russ1642: Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.


Anyone who thinks that raising their kids the way they (think) they were raised is guaranteeing their children will be radically different than them. Pushing your loves and hobbies on your kids is ridiculous. "I love Star Wars, I'll make my kid love it too!!!!!"

Think about it this way: When Star Wars came out, the dads of that era weren't trying to get their kids totally excited about the Lone Ranger, or Howdy Doody, or whatever they were in to in the late 50s. Why should my kids be indoctrinated in to the thing I loved as a kid? Much better for them to discover their own thing to obsess over.
 
2013-09-05 10:52:27 AM  

Hebalo: Russ1642: Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.

Anyone who thinks that raising their kids the way they (think) they were raised is guaranteeing their children will be radically different than them. Pushing your loves and hobbies on your kids is ridiculous. "I love Star Wars, I'll make my kid love it too!!!!!"

Think about it this way: When Star Wars came out, the dads of that era weren't trying to get their kids totally excited about the Lone Ranger, or Howdy Doody, or whatever they were in to in the late 50s. Why should my kids be indoctrinated in to the thing I loved as a kid? Much better for them to discover their own thing to obsess over.


But with something like Star Wars or Star Trek, you can give your kid the option of trying without forcing them to love it. I know that my 3 year old Nephew will watch Star Wars with his dad and Star Trek with me to see if he likes it. I already made him watch Speed Racer and he loves it. And before you say that's a bad thing, he is in love with cars, the movie and the actual thing. So I made a logical call and we both sat down and watched the Speed Racer movie and the TV show.
 
2013-09-05 10:57:39 AM  

Hebalo: Russ1642: Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.

Anyone who thinks that raising their kids the way they (think) they were raised is guaranteeing their children will be radically different than them. Pushing your loves and hobbies on your kids is ridiculous. "I love Star Wars, I'll make my kid love it too!!!!!"

Think about it this way: When Star Wars came out, the dads of that era weren't trying to get their kids totally excited about the Lone Ranger, or Howdy Doody, or whatever they were in to in the late 50s. Why should my kids be indoctrinated in to the thing I loved as a kid? Much better for them to discover their own thing to obsess over.


An exception should be made for music.  Some music is just plain better.  It's almost an obligation to raise kids on approximately Hendrix-era through Nirvana-era.  And I say this as someone born in the late 80s.
 
2013-09-05 11:02:00 AM  

wildcardjack: shiat, in hindsight I wish my parents didn't buy an NES superpack and an Apple IIc. I learned to touch type before I learned to write. I spent summers indoors, and I didn't realize Battletoads were a big old impossible "fark you" until I was an adult. I hope I'll make any child of mine balance their console game time with a musical instrument or artistic medium, unlike my parents.


Really wish I would have learned to play a musical instrument with all the hours I invested into playing my NES in my teenage years.   It definitely would have translated into more poon later on in life.     These are the life lessons we must pass on to our sons.
 
2013-09-05 11:14:45 AM  

Archie Goodwin: ajgeek: Isn't this a repeat?

Only every year since forever.


And sometimes there is proof:
http://wondermark.com/true-stuff-telephone-menace/
 
2013-09-05 11:15:29 AM  

icebergcomics: How old is the picture for the article? A joystick with a cable? really?


I can even tell you which joystick that is - a Gravis. I sold a ton of those at Egghead back in the early 90's. Seriously, someone didn't have an XBox controller laying around?
 
2013-09-05 11:39:59 AM  

Sybarite: I'm oooooold! And I'm not happy! And I don't like things now compared to the way they used to be. All this progress -- phooey! In my day, we didn't have these cash machines that would give you money when you needed it. There was only one bank in each state -- it was open only one hour a year. And you'd get in line, seventeen miles long, and the line became an angry mob of people -- fornicators and thieves, mutant children and circus freaks -- and you waited for years and by the time you got to the teller, you were senile and arthritic and you couldn't remember your own name. You were born, got in line, and ya died! And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Life was simpler then. There wasn't all this concern about hy-giene! It my days, we didn't have Kleenex. When you turned seventeen, you were given the family handkerchief. ... It hadn't been washed in generations and it stood on its own ... filled with diseases and swarmin' with flies. ... If you tried to blow your nose, you'd get an infection and your head would swell up and turn green and children would burst into tears at the sight o' ya! And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Life was a carnival! We entertained ourselves! We didn't need moooovin' pitchurrrres. In my day, there was only one show in town -- it was called "Stare at the sun!" ... That's right! You'd sit in the middle of an open field and stare up at the sun till your eyeballs burst into flames! And you thought, "Oh, no! Maybe I shouldn't've stared directly into the burning sun with my eyes wide open." But it was too late! Your head was on fire and people were roastin' chickens over it. ... And that's the way it was and we liked it!

Progress?! Flobble-de-flee! In my day, when we were angry and frustrated, we just said, "Flobble-de-flee!" 'cause we were idiots and we didn't know what else to say! Just a bunch o' illiterate Cro-Magnons, blowin' on crusty handkerchiefs, waitin' in lines for our head to burst into flame and that's the way it wa ...


You sound like my wife, the Ultimate Luddite.
 
2013-09-05 11:49:27 AM  

gnosis301: Ah, Dana Carvey. In my day, SNL meant something.


Huh, guess I have some gaps in my education.  I would have guessed Mr. Show.  It sounds so much like one of Bob Odenkirk's characters that I read it in that voice.
 
2013-09-05 11:52:47 AM  

Last Man on Earth: Huh, guess I have some gaps in my education.  I would have guessed Mr. Show.  It sounds so much like one of Bob Odenkirk's characters that I read it in that voice.


http://www.imdb.com/video/hulu/vi771791897/ with bonus young Dennis Miller
 
2013-09-05 11:54:29 AM  

gnosis301: Last Man on Earth: Huh, guess I have some gaps in my education.  I would have guessed Mr. Show.  It sounds so much like one of Bob Odenkirk's characters that I read it in that voice.

http://www.imdb.com/video/hulu/vi771791897/ with bonus young Dennis Miller


Sweet, thanks.  I'll give it a watch soon as I'm out of class.
 
2013-09-05 12:05:58 PM  
I do think it's a problem to raise kids in a manner too disconnected from each other and the world around them. But this happened in earlier times as well: if anything, it has been the norm (or very nearly so) for aristocracy since ancient times. All technology has done is make it accessible to the masses.
 
2013-09-05 12:23:26 PM  
Whippersnappers' problem isn't too much technology, it's too much of SOMEONE ELSE'S technology.

Give them a RaspberryPi or something similar, then tell them they've got the iPad for one more week so they can use it to look up how to get the RaspberryPi working, then the iPad's getting sold off on EBay.

Then maybe the ungrateful little brats will APPRECIATE the technology a little, and stay off my lawn!

/Side-effects may include your kids stealing your credit-card numbers, getting into your porn stash, or becoming wealthy and then sticking you in a nursing home by the time you're 50.
 
2013-09-05 12:25:45 PM  

Russ1642: Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.


i've 2 older sisters, each have 4 grown adult children, all 8 'kids' are college educated. eldest sister is highly intelligent, holds multiple degrees and has a good understanding of things in general. while they attended church as a family she did not shove it down their throats. her kids are a blast to be around, are all well grounded, well traveled, well read, witty and stimulating conversationalists.
my other sister still helicopters her brood (all in their 20's, 2 married). they were raised with church services and bible study rammed down their throats. there are cutesy bible message plaques all other that sisters house. each of her kids had to attend religion-first based colleges. while they are nice people these kids have their heads so far rammed up their arses it's a heartbreak. they are clueless about most of the realities of life, have 0 street smarts and possess the personal maturity of perhaps 12 year olds. it's interesting to see the vast differences between the 2 families. scary, too.
 
2013-09-05 12:27:37 PM  
If your childhood resulted in an adult who complains about "kids these days", then your childhood wasn't so good either.

That being said, if I ever have kids whenever they want a new video game they can have it if they beat an NES game of my choosing. Not that the games I grew up with were better (they weren't), but they took more than 20 hours to master. I figure it'll quadruple the amount of time between them getting new games at the very least, and save me a fortune.
 
2013-09-05 12:29:18 PM  
I'd say it also depends on how you choose to use technology in a household.  If it is just a substitution for mindless TV watching, you are going to get one result.  If you help kids use technology to do things or drive curiosity, than you will get a different result, and probably a better one.

Google Earth is a pretty cheap way to introduce the world to young kids.  Celestia does likewise for the rest of the universe.
 
2013-09-05 12:39:02 PM  
I don't know what school their kids go to, but my kid needed the internet for homework and school projects.  I can see limiting time, but not denying it completely.  And as far as social media is concerned, yes, kids spend a lot of time on it and parents complain.  When I was a kid, we spent a lot of time on the phone and our parents complained.  It's normal for parents to hate whatever their kids are doing.
 
2013-09-05 12:44:28 PM  

Nuclear Monk: I'd say it also depends on how you choose to use technology in a household.  If it is just a substitution for mindless TV watching, you are going to get one result.  If you help kids use technology to do things or drive curiosity, than you will get a different result, and probably a better one.

Google Earth is a pretty cheap way to introduce the world to young kids.  Celestia does likewise for the rest of the universe.


Agreed. A significant amount of time should be spent outdoors doing things though too. Many studies show that kids who spend more time in "green space", which can even include city parks, are healthier (physically and emotionally) and tend to have better cognitive performance.
 
2013-09-05 01:20:38 PM  
farm6.staticflickr.com
 
2013-09-05 01:21:45 PM  

entropic_existence: Nuclear Monk: I'd say it also depends on how you choose to use technology in a household.  If it is just a substitution for mindless TV watching, you are going to get one result.  If you help kids use technology to do things or drive curiosity, than you will get a different result, and probably a better one.

Google Earth is a pretty cheap way to introduce the world to young kids.  Celestia does likewise for the rest of the universe.

Agreed. A significant amount of time should be spent outdoors doing things though too. Many studies show that kids who spend more time in "green space", which can even include city parks, are healthier (physically and emotionally) and tend to have better cognitive performance.


The Dangerous Book for Boys and the Daring Book for Girls are excellent tomes to provide hints for outdoor activity.

Interesting that cutting back on technology is considered child abuse that will result in an inability to use tech devices. Do we suppose that anyone who grew up without a TV would be unable to turn one on? Let's not kid ourselves, devices have gotten EASIER to use. Old school VCRs were tricky to program. Nowadays, you simply pick the time you want to record.
 
2013-09-05 01:26:23 PM  
Just because every generation tends to critique the ones coming after, doesn't mean that some of what they are saying isn't true.

Technology is great, but I can't see how anyone can think it's a good thing that there are kids who are so connected that they feel obligated to text during a movie.  Adjusting to new stuff takes time, and it is up to parents to help guide that adjustment.
 
2013-09-05 01:33:02 PM  

Wade_Wilson: If your childhood resulted in an adult who complains about "kids these days", then your childhood wasn't so good either.

That being said, if I ever have kids whenever they want a new video game they can have it if they beat an NES game of my choosing. Not that the games I grew up with were better (they weren't), but they took more than 20 hours to master. I figure it'll quadruple the amount of time between them getting new games at the very least, and save me a fortune.


So, Battletoads and Bayou Billy, eh?
 
2013-09-05 01:41:23 PM  

Hebalo: Russ1642: Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.

Anyone who thinks that raising their kids the way they (think) they were raised is guaranteeing their children will be radically different than them. Pushing your loves and hobbies on your kids is ridiculous. "I love Star Wars, I'll make my kid love it too!!!!!"

Think about it this way: When Star Wars came out, the dads of that era weren't trying to get their kids totally excited about the Lone Ranger, or Howdy Doody, or whatever they were in to in the late 50s. Why should my kids be indoctrinated in to the thing I loved as a kid? Much better for them to discover their own thing to obsess over.


You don't think dads have always been pushing such things? why the fark did they make a lone ranger movie in 1981?

It's just back then marketers hadn't gotten into every nook and crevice, and so they were limited to what they could pass down, which in those days, wasn't much. remember, this is the era when everyone's mom threw out their comics and baseball cards. if it wasn't in a store there wasn't an ebay to go get old stuff. baseball survived on nostalgia of fathers passing down love of the sport to their sons. etc
 
2013-09-05 01:49:48 PM  
You had rocks?  Luxury.
 
2013-09-05 02:20:47 PM  

Fano: The Dangerous Book for Boys and the Daring Book for Girls are excellent tomes to provide hints for outdoor activity.

Interesting that cutting back on technology is considered child abuse that will result in an inability to use tech devices. Do we suppose that anyone who grew up without a TV would be unable to turn one on? Let's not kid ourselves, devices have gotten EASIER to use. Old school VCRs were tricky to program. Nowadays, you simply pick the time you want to record.


Yeah, when it comes to tech if/when I have kids I'm all about exposure and regular use. I think having a generation who grew up with touchpads since before they could type is potentially quite interesting in terms of how they will approach computing later in life. And since I'm a scientist who spends a significant portion of my time writing code, and the rest using software to study data, I'm definitely in favour of having kids being computationally savvy. Of course I grew up using computers, playing outside, and playing hockey. And now one of my favourite hobbies is fly fishing. I'm guessing I can instil some sort of balanced approach in any hypothetical kids.
 
2013-09-05 02:48:26 PM  
Right now my kids are 3 (boy) and 1.5 (girl).  My son has a Leap Pad 2, and I let him play on my computer, but I only let him use those things for maybe a half hour at the most (they can either do that or watch TV for 30 mins).  They have access to some artistic stuff (painting supplies and musical instruments), some puzzles, blocks, etc...

Saturday mornings they get to watch cartoons until noon (because Saturday mornings are made for cartoons, hell I watch with them if I can).  We leave the front door open and let them run around in the yard and play in the dirt (my daughter loves to play in the dirt).  We read them stories before bed.

So, we try to give them some "structured freedom".  I am not trying to limit their exposure to technology, but I am trying to foster a sense that there is more to life then that.  Once they are older we will bust out the board games and maybe some family video game time is in order as well (which I am excited about), maybe some day some D&D when they get old enough.
 
2013-09-05 03:26:11 PM  

Epicanis: Whippersnappers' problem isn't too much technology, it's too much of SOMEONE ELSE'S technology.

Give them a RaspberryPi or something similar, then tell them they've got the iPad for one more week so they can use it to look up how to get the RaspberryPi working, then the iPad's getting sold off on EBay.

W

hen I was babysitting my 7 year old nephew, we built his dad (and my brother in law) an Raspbmc Media Center for Father's Day as an afternoon project.   He was pretty proud of himself.
 
2013-09-05 03:38:20 PM  

Burr: Right now my kids are 3 (boy) and 1.5 (girl).  My son has a Leap Pad 2, and I let him play on my computer, but I only let him use those things for maybe a half hour at the most (they can either do that or watch TV for 30 mins).  They have access to some artistic stuff (painting supplies and musical instruments), some puzzles, blocks, etc...

Saturday mornings they get to watch cartoons until noon (because Saturday mornings are made for cartoons, hell I watch with them if I can).  We leave the front door open and let them run around in the yard and play in the dirt (my daughter loves to play in the dirt).  We read them stories before bed.

So, we try to give them some "structured freedom".  I am not trying to limit their exposure to technology, but I am trying to foster a sense that there is more to life then that.  Once they are older we will bust out the board games and maybe some family video game time is in order as well (which I am excited about), maybe some day some D&D when they get old enough.


That is what my brother is doing with his kids they seem to have a well rounded grasp on technology and the outside world and have intrest in both.
 
2013-09-05 03:52:29 PM  

Fano: Wade_Wilson: If your childhood resulted in an adult who complains about "kids these days", then your childhood wasn't so good either.

That being said, if I ever have kids whenever they want a new video game they can have it if they beat an NES game of my choosing. Not that the games I grew up with were better (they weren't), but they took more than 20 hours to master. I figure it'll quadruple the amount of time between them getting new games at the very least, and save me a fortune.

So, Battletoads and Bayou Billy, eh?


Silver Surfer, maybe?
 
2013-09-05 04:27:06 PM  

GoodyearPimp: Fano: Wade_Wilson: If your childhood resulted in an adult who complains about "kids these days", then your childhood wasn't so good either.

That being said, if I ever have kids whenever they want a new video game they can have it if they beat an NES game of my choosing. Not that the games I grew up with were better (they weren't), but they took more than 20 hours to master. I figure it'll quadruple the amount of time between them getting new games at the very least, and save me a fortune.

So, Battletoads and Bayou Billy, eh?

Silver Surfer, maybe?


How about some of the modern games that are actually difficult. Games like the Soul Series that punish you for being stupid and is trial and error on most boss battles. No matter how high a level you are, there is no part in that game where you are OPed to 1 hit any boss. Now players, yes, you can be OPed to kill players easily.
 
2013-09-05 04:32:29 PM  
To be fair - I played a fair amount of vidya when I was a kid but also played outside in the woods, and went to the community pools in summer, etc.

But if you look (using google maps) at where I used to live, the woods have all been torn up for more housing, same with the place I lived in during high school, while I was there any "play in the woods" type woods were turned into cookie cutter homes. So I can't blame kids today for not playing outside, there are fewer places to play that are interesting (and away from the eyes of adults, which is half of what made them interesting).

Also, adults are much less open to the freedom I had - I was basically given a bike and left to learn to ride it, then given fairly free rein (come back by nightfall, tell us where you're going in very broad terms). Are parents still as willing to let forth graders bike around the neighborhood looking for something to do?
 
2013-09-05 05:18:43 PM  

adamatari: To be fair - I played a fair amount of vidya when I was a kid but also played outside in the woods, and went to the community pools in summer, etc.

But if you look (using google maps) at where I used to live, the woods have all been torn up for more housing, same with the place I lived in during high school, while I was there any "play in the woods" type woods were turned into cookie cutter homes. So I can't blame kids today for not playing outside, there are fewer places to play that are interesting (and away from the eyes of adults, which is half of what made them interesting).

Also, adults are much less open to the freedom I had - I was basically given a bike and left to learn to ride it, then given fairly free rein (come back by nightfall, tell us where you're going in very broad terms). Are parents still as willing to let forth graders bike around the neighborhood looking for something to do?


This. I lived in the woods near my house in the summer running around with our German Shepard. We had a small stock market on the outskirts I would visit on the way there and feed the horses. The other side of town had acres of wooded park riddled with trails where my few friends and I would have mock battles of all types. 43 and dearly miss my childhood before junior high school sent my life straight to hell.
 
2013-09-05 05:24:29 PM  
Actually, I think *everyone* has too much technology.  Too many people rely on their GPS to find their way around, their iPhones to find basic information, and even go into withdrawal if they can't check their facebook feed a dozen times a day.  That being said, I spend almost all my waking hours on the internet, but if it were to go out, I'd just drag my butt down to the local library, get a dozen or so books and I'd be fine.  Hell, I might even start building model cars again.
 
2013-09-05 07:02:07 PM  

klaatuwolf: Actually, I think *everyone* has too much technology.  Too many people rely on their GPS to find their way around, their iPhones to find basic information, and even go into withdrawal if they can't check their facebook feed a dozen times a day.  That being said, I spend almost all my waking hours on the internet, but if it were to go out, I'd just drag my butt down to the local library, get a dozen or so books and I'd be fine.  Hell, I might even start building model cars again.


I've seriously started cutting down on my internet time. I'm on a computer all day for work, so being on it all night at home just isn't healthy. Some days I still spend a fair amount of time online or watching TV via Netflix but I'm definitely reducing it. More time listening to the radio or music while I read or something. Took up fly fishing this summer after more than 15 years since I last did it, taking up guitar, and going to soon start doing some simple woodworking. Probably start tieing flies for fishing over the winter too.

I definitely still love technology, and wouldn't get rid of my smartphone for anything. But I have turned off/down the majority of alerts and ignore it most of the time. Its valuable when I need it and important e-mail I want to see will come up with a non-audible alert so when I happen to glance at my phone I know there is something to look at when I have time. Definitely all a change for the better.
 
2013-09-05 11:34:42 PM  

yves0010: Hebalo: Russ1642: Wow. Those parents suck. Trying to raise your kid in a bubble from another time is going to backfire. I've seen how religious parents raise kids in a bubble of naivety and denial, and when they're on their own it takes them at least a decade to catch up. This is no different.

Anyone who thinks that raising their kids the way they (think) they were raised is guaranteeing their children will be radically different than them. Pushing your loves and hobbies on your kids is ridiculous. "I love Star Wars, I'll make my kid love it too!!!!!"

Think about it this way: When Star Wars came out, the dads of that era weren't trying to get their kids totally excited about the Lone Ranger, or Howdy Doody, or whatever they were in to in the late 50s. Why should my kids be indoctrinated in to the thing I loved as a kid? Much better for them to discover their own thing to obsess over.

But with something like Star Wars or Star Trek, you can give your kid the option of trying without forcing them to love it. I know that my 3 year old Nephew will watch Star Wars with his dad and Star Trek with me to see if he likes it. I already made him watch Speed Racer and he loves it. And before you say that's a bad thing, he is in love with cars, the movie and the actual thing. So I made a logical call and we both sat down and watched the Speed Racer movie and the TV show.


That Speed Racer movie is right up there with The Princess Bride for re-watchable family movies that are good and won't drive you insane to watch a bazillion times. I just don't get tired of it.
 
2013-09-06 01:05:53 AM  

Ohlookabutterfly: adamatari: To be fair - I played a fair amount of vidya when I was a kid but also played outside in the woods, and went to the community pools in summer, etc.

But if you look (using google maps) at where I used to live, the woods have all been torn up for more housing, same with the place I lived in during high school, while I was there any "play in the woods" type woods were turned into cookie cutter homes. So I can't blame kids today for not playing outside, there are fewer places to play that are interesting (and away from the eyes of adults, which is half of what made them interesting).

Also, adults are much less open to the freedom I had - I was basically given a bike and left to learn to ride it, then given fairly free rein (come back by nightfall, tell us where you're going in very broad terms). Are parents still as willing to let forth graders bike around the neighborhood looking for something to do?

This. I lived in the woods near my house in the summer running around with our German Shepard. We had a small stock market on the outskirts I would visit on the way there and feed the horses. The other side of town had acres of wooded park riddled with trails where my few friends and I would have mock battles of all types. 43 and dearly miss my childhood before junior high school sent my life straight to hell.


All of this. I live in an area with lakes, rivers, mountains, and a greenway connecting everything for miles. Sports are also a high priority all year. I volunteer to help w/ 5th & 6th graders once a week and it seems most are well-rounded. There's the occassional kid who does nothing but sit in front of television or game system, but most spend more time outdoors. I imagine their outdoors experience would be limited if the closest green space was several blocks away.
 
2013-09-06 09:05:15 AM  

Fafai: That Speed Racer movie is right up there with The Princess Bride for re-watchable family movies that are good and won't drive you insane to watch a bazillion times. I just don't get tired of it.


I am with you on that one. It is a fun movie that does not take itself too serious. Love just watching it and laughing when they do something ridiculous.
 
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