Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(ESPN)   Roger Goodell defends the NFL concussion settlement, calling it fair given that most players involved won't even remember why they sued a few years from now   (espn.go.com ) divider line
    More: Asinine, Roger Goodell, NFL, concussion, Super Bowl XLIII, CTE, Vince Lombardi  
•       •       •

343 clicks; posted to Sports » on 04 Sep 2013 at 3:04 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-04 03:09:42 PM  
Just read where some former College Players are suing the NCAA over this.

I have no idea how that will play out.
 
2013-09-04 03:18:49 PM  
Each player will take the money and go to Dizzy Land.
 
2013-09-04 03:19:11 PM  
I'm no lawyer, but don't both sides have to agree to the settlement?  How can they get/give crap if they both agreed to it?

This is dumb.
 
2013-09-04 03:20:26 PM  
Surprising. I thought Goodell would gloat about the settlement and perhaps mock the retired players. But instead he acted like a normal human being instead of a cartoonish super villain. This does not jive with the expectations I have of him based on Fark threads.
 
2013-09-04 03:21:10 PM  
I'm not sure what to think of this until Pete Prisco writes another meandering diatribe of tough-guy alpha male drivel. He is my muse and spirit animal.
 
2013-09-04 03:22:25 PM  
He sez, "It was the best possible outcomes for both sides."  Meaning, it was the best possible outcome for HIM.  I say, strap him to a table, and ram him into a brick wall repeatedly for about, oh let's say ... 5 years.

THEN we'll see if he sez, "It was the best possible outcome."  He'll be lucky if he can count to potato before he goes on a mad rampage and winds up shooting himself.

Come to think of it ... that actually would be a pretty good outcome.
 
2013-09-04 03:23:40 PM  
I've been pretty impressed with the legion of players -- aside from the merits of the 450+ lawsuits and whther the settlement reflects justice -- who decided not to join the tide of lawsuits.  I heard a guy on the radio last week, I think a Packers announcer or perhaps Vikings, some dude who played in the 70s, basically say "I knew what I was getting into when I signed the dotted line, a lot of these players didn't manage their money well and see this as their last chance to get paid."

I guess "legion" is the wrong word to use, but there is good number of NFL players that didn't join the suit.  Worth noting.
 
2013-09-04 03:28:16 PM  

Seat's Taken: I'm no lawyer, but don't both sides have to agree to the settlement?  How can they get/give crap if they both agreed to it?

This is dumb.


Because only a handful of players were directly involved.
 
2013-09-04 03:30:32 PM  
i1222.photobucket.com
 
2013-09-04 03:42:05 PM  

rickythepenguin: I've been pretty impressed with the legion of players -- aside from the merits of the 450+ lawsuits and whther the settlement reflects justice -- who decided not to join the tide of lawsuits.  I heard a guy on the radio last week, I think a Packers announcer or perhaps Vikings, some dude who played in the 70s, basically say "I knew what I was getting into when I signed the dotted line, a lot of these players didn't manage their money well and see this as their last chance to get paid."

I guess "legion" is the wrong word to use, but there is good number of NFL players that didn't join the suit.  Worth noting.


Except the whole point of the lawsuit was that perhaps players DIDNT know what they were signing up for because the NFL and its doctors didn't tell them.

Was there a cover up? Were doctors lying to players? Now we won't know! Hooray!
 
2013-09-04 03:43:51 PM  

Killer Cars: I'm not sure what to think of this until Pete Prisco writes another meandering diatribe of tough-guy alpha male drivel. He is my muse and spirit animal.


That really was a stunning example of Internet Tough Guyism on a national platform, lol.
 
2013-09-04 03:44:29 PM  

Dr. Kefarkian: He sez, "It was the best possible outcomes for both sides."  Meaning, it was the best possible outcome for HIM.  I say, strap him to a table, and ram him into a brick wall repeatedly for about, oh let's say ... 5 years.


If you read the articles about it, it becomes very obvious it was the best situation for both sides.  Most of the suits would have been dismissed by the jusdge, and the NFL would have egg on its face from Discovery from the other ones.  Players got money for what happened to them, and the NFL got to save face.

http://deadspin.com/why-the-nfl-and-players-were-both-desperate-to-s et tle-c-1243931321
 
2013-09-04 03:49:45 PM  
The players took the settlement because it was apparent to them the judge was about to dismiss the suit.
 
2013-09-04 03:56:56 PM  

ElwoodCuse: Now we won't know!


we will, the settlement is far from the end of things
 
2013-09-04 04:01:32 PM  
 
2013-09-04 04:04:15 PM  

rickythepenguin: robsul82: That really was a stunning example of Internet Tough Guyism on a national platform, lol.

It wasn't funny. It wasn't insightful. It was stating the f*cking obvious to anyone who follows baseball and the ellipsis is usually done to show something provocative or mysterious and all it did was show us what we already know. So piss off and next time don't mess with the guy who f*cking writes for a living, ace.
(in case you missed this a few days ago)


Oh, I did miss that.  Lovely.
 
2013-09-04 04:07:05 PM  

robsul82: Oh, I did miss that. Lovely.



when i read that i was like, "uh.....did that really just happen?"  high comedy.
 
2013-09-04 04:11:45 PM  

robsul82: Oh, I did miss that. Lovely.


and the other thing, speaking of the Exegesis On the Ellipsis, is that Ryne Freaking Sandberg returning to Wrigley as the coach of the Cubs opponent, is in fact "provocative", especially since Sandberg, completely aside from what he meant to the Cubs as a player, coached in the Cubs organization for several years but was passed over.  So him paying his dues as a player and coach for the team, to be passed over, then return to Wrigley in different laundry, that isn't "provocative"?

it was braised fail with fail sauce, with a light dusting of fail.
 
2013-09-04 04:38:52 PM  
Hi, I'm Tom
i202.photobucket.com

/best I could do
//Hi, I'm Tom
 
2013-09-04 09:51:04 PM  

robsul82: Killer Cars: I'm not sure what to think of this until Pete Prisco writes another meandering diatribe of tough-guy alpha male drivel. He is my muse and spirit animal.

That really was a stunning example of Internet Tough Guyism on a national platform, lol.


And Olbermann smacked that down in an excellent way.
 
2013-09-05 12:32:21 AM  
It's not fair because they won't remember. It's fair because if you'd have presented them with a waiver in 36 point type when they were twenty years old that said YOU PROBABLY WILL NEED A CANE AT 50 AND THERE'S A GOOD CHANCE YOU'LL NEVER SEE 60 AT ALL,  they'd have gladly signed it, probably to the man.
 
2013-09-05 06:46:28 AM  

JohnBigBootay: YOU PROBABLY WILL NEED A CANE AT 50


The point of the suit was, that waiver would not have included YOU WON'T BE ABLE TO REMEMBER YOUR OWN NAME SOME MORNINGS AND YOU'LL END UP PUTTING A SHOTGUN TO YOUR CHEST BY THE TIME YOU HIT 50.
 
2013-09-05 08:40:39 AM  
The most important thing about all of this is the impact on college, high school, and youth football. Sure the NFL can afford to pay out. Can your college afford it? Maybe some of the biggest D1 schools, what about D2 or D3? What about your high school?

Would you want your son playing football for 8 years knowing there's a greater chance of developing CTE later in life than there is of him getting paid to play?
 
2013-09-05 02:06:46 PM  

UNC_Samurai: YOU WON'T BE ABLE TO REMEMBER YOUR OWN NAME SOME MORNINGS AND YOU'LL END UP PUTTING A SHOTGUN TO YOUR CHEST BY THE TIME YOU HIT 50.


Probably because that's extremely unlikely.
 
2013-09-05 04:10:53 PM  
Extremely unlikely?

pocketdoppler.com

No, not every former player is Dave Duerson, Andre Waters, Junior Seau, Shane Dronett, Jeff Alm, or Ray Easterling.  Some drink antifreeze like Terry Long.  Others like Mike Webster take the slow, painful route, with a decades-long spiral through dementia and drug abuse.
 
2013-09-05 05:40:12 PM  

UNC_Samurai: Extremely unlikely?

[pocketdoppler.com image 400x300]

No, not every former player is Dave Duerson, Andre Waters, Junior Seau, Shane Dronett, Jeff Alm, or Ray Easterling.  Some drink antifreeze like Terry Long.  Others like Mike Webster take the slow, painful route, with a decades-long spiral through dementia and drug abuse.


And there are HOW many people who have played in the NFL over those years?
 
2013-09-05 06:55:34 PM  

IAmRight: UNC_Samurai: Extremely unlikely?

[pocketdoppler.com image 400x300]

No, not every former player is Dave Duerson, Andre Waters, Junior Seau, Shane Dronett, Jeff Alm, or Ray Easterling.  Some drink antifreeze like Terry Long.  Others like Mike Webster take the slow, painful route, with a decades-long spiral through dementia and drug abuse.

And there are HOW many people who have played in the NFL over those years?


So there's an acceptable ratio of players who commit suicide later in life when the league withheld, downplayed, and disregarded information on cranial trauma?
 
Displayed 27 of 27 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report