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(Today)   Researchers dismayed to find that Gen Y employees are the first to figure out how corporate America really works. I'd finish this headline, but I just got thrown under the bus by Steve in Accounting   (today.com) divider line 65
    More: Obvious, Gen Y, Ernst & Young  
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17200 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Sep 2013 at 4:03 PM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-09-03 02:24:09 PM
10 votes:
I wonder if they are worried about themselves because a shiatload of them are not making enough money to make ends meet and watching completely unequal compensation go to the owners and boards of said corporations
2013-09-03 02:10:01 PM
8 votes:
It's almost like, maybe Gen Y figured out that the corporate world is 110% dog eat dog, that the system is permanently rigged, and noone is going to help you when the chips are set to fall.  and they are reacting accordingly.
2013-09-03 04:23:33 PM
6 votes:
Most jobs just amount to theater performances. We have so much technology and so many resources, it's impossible to have real jobs for everyone anymore. Instead of choosing to build a leisure society in which everyone benefits from our technology, we've built a society in which most people are just there to transfer money between m/billionaires.
2013-09-03 04:17:39 PM
6 votes:
Newsflash:  Young people make terrible managers because they lack experience.
2013-09-03 02:27:45 PM
6 votes:

Elandriel: I wonder if they are worried about themselves because a shiatload of them are not making enough money to make ends meet and watching completely unequal compensation go to the owners and boards of said corporations


i think it's more a case of them being educated in schools that awarded medals for ninth place. they've been coddled since birth and expect to be coddled at work too.

/gen x.
//harumph!
2013-09-03 02:41:33 PM
5 votes:
FTA:The good news is that Gen Y members are perceived as tech savvy, and smart about ways to leverage social media

Social Media != tech savvy

The number of people my age I know who are inept when it comes to computers and tech is amazing. Oh! I might have to reboot my desktop after I've left a java filled website running for a week? What's that scarey looking black and white text screen?

The ability to upload a video to Facebook is nothing on the tech scale. Most people don't know the first thing about how their microwaves work let alone their computer. It like arguing that a good driver makes a good mechanic. I wonder how many can even create an Excel sheet with formulas?

I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?

//the term leverage needs to be binned from it's current usage
///going to leverage the cloud to increase synergy as a value proposition to achieve six sigma
2013-09-03 04:41:53 PM
4 votes:
All you need to know:

i.imgur.com
2013-09-03 04:13:10 PM
4 votes:
They pretend to pay us, and we pretend to work.
2013-09-03 03:02:04 PM
4 votes:

Rev.K: I'm 34 and I'm not a manager.

Where did I go wrong?


You were born with intelligence and a sense of empathy.
2013-09-03 07:46:31 PM
3 votes:

zedster: As much as I hate Apple I think it boils down to that we stopped teaching basics. It seems like most Baby Boomers who have a four year degree had to learn fortran punch cards at some point and later word perfect macros. We assume our generation will learn tech through osmosis and failed to teach important skills in the information age like oh, critical thinking


No, it's just the 90/10 rule applied to something whenever it reaches critical mass. The computer industry is following the automobile industry in the exact same pattern.

When both industries started out, the only people interested were students, hobbyists, intellectuals and geeks. They would take the engine/computer apart, study its innards, figure out how it worked, and maybe add new things to it or improved it in some way. At the time, both devices were considered toys or novelties -- not particularly useful.

In time, when the toys became tools, and the companies that made them became industries, a second generation took them up. This generation was also very tech/mechanically savvy, to the point where if the thing broke down, they were usually smart enough to know how to fix it.

But when the car/computer became so ubiquitous, and it reached critical mass, then you get the third generation buying them, and these people aren't interested in how they work at all. Thus, user-interface design schemas take over, as engineers figure out how to make the device as simple as possible for ignorant laymen to use.

Today, most people aren't interested in how their computer works just as they're not interested in how their car works. They will never look under the hood and they will never unscrew the lid from the box. They just want to know that when they push the pedal or button, the car/computer does what it's supposed to. And when it breaks, they take it to a specialist who can fix it. They don't want to know how or why it works -- they're just not interested in learning. And there's nothing wrong with that.

What we are seeing now with the Millenials is the first computer-using generation that doesn't know anything about computers. That's not a knock on them, because the same thing happened to the automobile industry when it exploded after the second world war. It happens to EVERY highly complex industry when it reaches critical mass.
2013-09-03 06:37:24 PM
3 votes:

LasersHurt: Being good at a job no longer entitles you to good wages and a strong career. You have to be able and willing to aggressively pursue career changes and promotions if you want to make real money.

It sucks, but it's the way things are in a lot of places.


Which propagates itself in fewer houses built and sold (and all that goes with them), lower birthrates, less long-term investment, and an overall lack of permanence along with the shrinking middle class. They may have more of money, but never settle down to spend it or live with it. What helped to create the middle class in this country is not just higher wages and better working conditions, but the societal shifts that allowed people to stay put and invest where they were, in one place. Without that, our future economy is screwed as people constantly roam the country and the world, bouncing from job to job to job every few years and never coming "home"... because they have none. Or rather, they never made one.
2013-09-03 05:13:30 PM
3 votes:
I wish they would stop generalizing generations like this.  I was born in 1983.  I have more in common with someone born in 1970 than I do with someone born in 1995.

Technology has moved so fast in the past 10-15 years, and our culture has changed as rapidly.
2013-09-03 05:06:03 PM
3 votes:

jankyboy: At my previous firm, we brought in young staff auditors straight out of college. Never have I met a more entitled group of people. Not only did they require constant supervision and hourly feedback, most of them lacked any real drive -- they acted as if everything would be handed to them in due time. Most assumed they would be promoted after "putting in a whole year".

I get tired of reading articles suggesting Gen-X managers/leaders adapt to the Gen-Y'ers. Newsflash... it's a two-way street. It's time Gen-Y realises the corporate world is dog-eat-dog.

Don't get me wrong, there were some strong performers in the bunch, but they were outnumbered by the lazy-asses.


I predict this has been said by every generation about the generation that enters the workforce after it since the entire history of western civilisation.

"Don't mind him - he's generation Sumeria - probably thinks lifting two pyramid blocks a day is what cuts it around here - back in my day the Pharoah would have had him whipped".
2013-09-03 04:42:09 PM
3 votes:
Ah, yes...  The age old story of how much more us old guys know.  It is, however true.

Back in the days of my old IBM PC that I had to boot up off a floppy, and no means of really navigating the OS unless you understood DOS commands.  In fact it was almost a necessity to understand BASIC at the very least, if you really wanted to do anything interesting.  It was possible to build a Frankenstein machine out of old parts.  Remember actually having to change jumpers on every piece of hardware so there were no conflicts?  Ah, those were the days.

If I were to try to get either one of my kids to make any sort of sense of that now, the first question would be, "where's the mouse?"

Computers are so ubiquitous nowadays that the old school ways are totally unneeded.  They more or less work like a TV now.  You turn it on.  It works.

I can't exactly say that this is good or bad.  But I would venture to say that there is some value in knowing the old-school, low-level version of things.  It really helps you get a grasp of what's going on in the background.  Assuming you really give a crap, which is perhaps another matter.
2013-09-03 04:28:59 PM
3 votes:

imgod2u: Tech savvy != knowing the inner workings of a computer.

To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.


While this may be true, the world is still filled with people (of all ages) who couldn't google the directions out of a wet paper bag. A bit part of knowledge is knowing what you don't know and knowing how to find it. Crafting good search engine queries is a critical job skill and students fail at it again and again.

If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.
2013-09-03 04:17:21 PM
3 votes:

zedster: Rincewind53: As a member of this generation, I agree entirely with your statement that young people don't know jack shiat about tech. It's appalling how many of my cohort would find themselves completely stymied by a very basic tech problem.

I blame Apple.


As much as I hate Apple I think it boils down to that we stopped teaching basics. It seems like most Baby Boomers who have a four year degree had to learn fortran punch cards at some point and later word perfect macros. We assume our generation will learn tech through osmosis and failed to teach important skills in the information age like oh, critical thinking. So you have the tree octopus problem


I think mostly it's a fact that the user interface has become so friendly.  It used to take some critical thinking to use a computer and now you don't really need it.  Same for cars.  People knew how to fix cars more in the past because they broke down all the time.
2013-09-03 04:16:55 PM
3 votes:
Anyone else pissed off by this?

"Gen Y bosses: entitled and out for themselves"
"...widely perceived as entitled"
"Entitled workers, those who feel they are owed things from their organization..."

And then this:
"A 2010 study by Paul Harvey, then an assistant professor of management at the University of New Hampshire, found that entitled employees are more likely to feel frustrated on the job and to lash out at colleagues."

I wonder if this 2010 study is using the same scientifically-derived definition of "entitled" as the rest of this journalistic masterpiece, or if an overly-broad term is being applied to many different phenomena?


/posted via my internet entitlement at work
2013-09-03 04:09:21 PM
3 votes:
So wait, people who are managers by the time they hit their 20s and 30s tend to be selfish and concerned with individual promotion? youdontsay.jpg
2013-09-03 04:08:06 PM
3 votes:

LasersHurt: Being good at a job no longer entitles you to good wages and a strong career. You have to be able and willing to aggressively pursue career changes and promotions if you want to make real money.

It sucks, but it's the way things are in a lot of places.


It's the result of our move from a wage-based economy to an asset-based economy. Happened under Reagan and has never stopped, and its caused serious, serious issues.
2013-09-03 02:19:02 PM
3 votes:

Grand_Moff_Joseph: It's almost like, maybe Gen Y figured out that the corporate world is 110% dog eat dog, that the system is permanently rigged, and noone is going to help you when the chips are set to fall.  and they are reacting accordingly.


Meanwhile, 30 years ago, someone else probably wrote this same article.

They called him a hippie and threw his ass out the door without publishing the story, but that's why we have the internet now.

// I knew this when I was 18, and I'm pretty sure my dad said as much about his bosses
2013-09-03 02:11:51 PM
3 votes:
"YOU, ALRIGHT! I LEARNED IT BY WATCHING YOU!"
2013-09-03 06:24:50 PM
2 votes:
I remember early in my career, fresh out of university,  being the youngest guy by ten years or more, put in to work with a team of older guys who'd been around a while.  Theoretically by job title I was now their boss, but our supervisor never allowed me to pull rank like that; I had to win them over for any collective enterprise we did, and run things by consensus.  So I did. It took weeks of patiently explaining why I was asking to do something a new way ("from that there book-larnin' school, damn college boy"), but they eventually saw that I actually knew my stuff, I had  a theoretical basis for everything I asked them to do,  and that what I asked them to do had positive results, which made the team look good, and we eventually got along great. The process helped me improve my listening skills and increased my empathy at the same time, so we built a good team with high esprit d'corps. It's at the point now where when we work as a team, it looks like we run by telepathy; everybody knows their role, anybody can make a suggestion, and consensus is quick.

Nowadays, I'm at the other end of the same telescope: I have to work under the commands and approvals of 20-something kids who weren't even old enough to drive when I was already an old hand at the job... and I marvel how little they seem to have learned from their school, compared to my day.  They never surprise me by seeming smarter than I am, they often ask painfully dumb questions that reveal a lack of background I find frightening. They are coming out measurably dumber, IMO.

I do get a strong sense of what has been mentioned earlier, that anything more than ten (hell, five) years back is buried with the dinos and irrelevant, as far as they are concerned, and that they think they're inventing old things for the first time, every day.  They also demonstrate reduced empathy and communication skill, preferring to keep their noses in their smartphones at all times, to just talking things over. They don't think of the crew they're working with any differently than they consider the waitstaff at their coffee shop.

So, I guess this is karmic payback to my own youth, but at least I grew from the experience and became better in a short time.  These kids today... I worry.
2013-09-03 05:50:55 PM
2 votes:
I am seriously going to start copying and pasting this.

I was born in 1983. Hulk Hogan and Reagan told me that communists were bad and trying to kill me. My maps and globes had the USSR on them. I remember "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall". I remember Saddam Hussein and READ MY LIPS, NO NEW TAXES. I was in freaking middle school when grunge peaked.  I was in college when the twin towers fell.

Do not lump me in with someone who grew up with cell phones, zero tolerance, dvrs, and the internet.

Jerks.
2013-09-03 05:23:02 PM
2 votes:
What to do when a younger boss throws you under the bus and you lose your job: Apply for unemployment and get turned down. Appeal and call that boss as a witness. Ask them difficult questions you can prove in writing, and when they perjure themselves, sue the company using the transcript of the hearing as evidence.

It worked for me. I got a payout, and the brown-nosing satan-skank of a boss got fired. None of this would have happened if I'd been treated fairly.

/Sleeps just fine at night
2013-09-03 05:16:22 PM
2 votes:

zedster: I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?


If done right, quite a bit. The ROI in social is significantly higher than the ROI in almost all traditional advertising, and higher than a large portion of other digital efforts.

Of course, it's impossible to convince boomers of this, even if you show them all sorts of pretty charts that clearly demonstrate value. Largely, this is because boomers assume that if it wasn't around when they were young, it's not really real and can safely be ignored. They're also terrified of things they can't understand, and think that they're smarter than everyone around them (up to and including very successful companies, many in the Fortune 500, that spend tons of money on social because they know there's a definite return there).

But I'm not bitter or anything.

More to the point of the article, is it possible that Gen Y managers are "seen" as entitled primarily by older workers who are bitter at their younger colleagues being put into positions of authority over them? Notice nowhere in the article, or the survey that it was based on, did they actually talk about any specific ways that Gen Y managers acted entitled. In fact, they didn't even actually bother to look at actual managerial actions or mindsets that would indicate that there was any entitlement going on. In FACT in fact, they specifically mentioned that Gen Y employees and managers were adaptable, ambitious, driven, and smart. So, with that, did nobody bother to say "Hmmm....these talented, ambitious, smart managers are jumping over the heads of older workers who can't keep up. How much of this "perceived" "entitlement" is actually bitterness and jealousy?"

I'm 29 and I've been put into managerial and leadership positions above people twice my age. From my experience (which is not statistically significant, mind you, but worth mentioning), the boomers twice my age were the most recalcitrant, difficult, conniving, and petty employees I have ever worked with. We ended up firing a client that my company was managing the marketing for because her in-house staff resented us being in charge and refused to do the work assigned to them. The client ended up crashing and burning very shortly afterwards, so there was some good news.

People have been whining about how entitled Gen Y is and how much we like to think we're better than older workers, and what a bunch of asses we all are. Unfortunately, if you look at the actual data, Gen Y workers are better educated, more efficient, have a better grasp of leveraging technology to increase productivity, and are advancing through the ranks of corporate america faster than any generation before us - all despite putting more emphasis on work/life balance and reporting higher life satisfaction than other generations. So if you think we're acting like we're better than you, it's because objectively, we are. Sorry, I know that hurts, and I know it sucks getting passed up for a promotion a decade before retiring (we know it was your last shot at that corner office. Maybe if you worked harder, you would have made it!), but that's the way it is.
2013-09-03 04:57:19 PM
2 votes:

Shostie: "YOU, ALRIGHT! I LEARNED IT BY WATCHING YOU!"


This.  You can't raise a bunch of kids by telling them that "the biggest cocksucker wins" and expect them to learn ethics or dignity.
2013-09-03 04:31:13 PM
2 votes:
Working for a wage is a sucker's bet anyway. The real reason that money management skills aren't taught in High School is that the entire system depends on generation after generation of wage earners voluntarily enslaving themselves and trading their finite lives for some toys that they are too exhausted to enjoy.


Gen Y, having grown up during an age of popular anti-heroes and unchecked corporate greed are nothing more than product of their environment. If they are selfish and entitled, that's only because that's the most production survival strategy.
2013-09-03 04:28:08 PM
2 votes:

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Rev.K: I'm 34 and I'm not a manager.

Where did I go wrong?

Nearly 31, and never want to be a people manager.


One should not want to be a slave or a master.
2013-09-03 04:15:47 PM
2 votes:
I've worked for both publicly traded and privately held corporations.

I'll stick with the privately held, they've treated me better, but better is a relative term.
2013-09-03 04:10:40 PM
2 votes:
What? People under 35 aren't the best managers? People older than that, maybe in their 40s and 50s are better managers in general? What the hell?
2013-09-03 04:08:47 PM
2 votes:

DamnYankees: Intrepid00: DamnYankees: What's Generation Y again? Is that me?

It tells you in article.

I can't be bothered to read that. Laziness in clicking is a trait of whatever generation I'm a part of.


That would be Gen X, we're lazy but apathetic.

Y is the one who feels self entitled despite their laziness
2013-09-03 02:52:44 PM
2 votes:

Rincewind53: As a member of this generation, I agree entirely with your statement that young people don't know jack shiat about tech. It's appalling how many of my cohort would find themselves completely stymied by a very basic tech problem.

I blame Apple.



As much as I hate Apple I think it boils down to that we stopped teaching basics. It seems like most Baby Boomers who have a four year degree had to learn fortran punch cards at some point and later word perfect macros. We assume our generation will learn tech through osmosis and failed to teach important skills in the information age like oh, critical thinking. So you have the tree octopus problem
2013-09-03 02:45:06 PM
2 votes:

zedster: FTA:The good news is that Gen Y members are perceived as tech savvy, and smart about ways to leverage social media

Social Media != tech savvy

The number of people my age I know who are inept when it comes to computers and tech is amazing. Oh! I might have to reboot my desktop after I've left a java filled website running for a week? What's that scarey looking black and white text screen?

The ability to upload a video to Facebook is nothing on the tech scale. Most people don't know the first thing about how their microwaves work let alone their computer. It like arguing that a good driver makes a good mechanic. I wonder how many can even create an Excel sheet with formulas?

I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?

//the term leverage needs to be binned from it's current usage
///going to leverage the cloud to increase synergy as a value proposition to achieve six sigma


As a member of this generation, I agree entirely with your statement that young people don't know jack shiat about tech. It's appalling how many of my cohort would find themselves completely stymied by a very basic tech problem.

I blame Apple.
2013-09-03 11:00:15 PM
1 votes:
Of course, the real crux of this issue is that, the genius red herring question of "what is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" (according to seasonally adjusted federal reserve economic data anywhere from $123.12 to $117.25, depending on the month) leaves out key costs and does not reflect true buying power of real median incomes.

Nominal Median incomes went from approximately $6,700 to $28,000. . . . increase of 320% vs 500% increase in fudged CPI prices. . .

Here's a hint, it ain't the shiatty entitled Gen Y (or otherwise generation) managers holding you down, it's the CEO, President, Vice Presidents, and Board. (and Obama of course, Thanks Obama!)
2013-09-03 09:30:31 PM
1 votes:
Fat people don't get fat taking their fair portion at the buffet.

Why we vilify one type of glutton (fat people), but worship another (the extremely rich) is the real question.
2013-09-03 09:29:19 PM
1 votes:

FlashHarry: Elandriel: I wonder if they are worried about themselves because a shiatload of them are not making enough money to make ends meet and watching completely unequal compensation go to the owners and boards of said corporations

i think it's more a case of them being educated in schools that awarded medals for ninth place. they've been coddled since birth and expect to be coddled at work too.

/gen x.
//harumph!


Or it could be that they came up poor, enlisted in the military, got out and got a job making just enough to keep up with the Joneses in DC, worked 60-80 hour weeks, buried themselves under a mountain of debt, lost their family, and when push came to shove, when it was time for management to step up and act like they give a shiat, all they heard from the top was "unfark yourself or you won't just be divorced, you'll be divorced and fired. Dumbass."

All the while, the CEO manipulates the stock price to get tens of millions.

No, I'm not bitter. I'm not bitter at all.
2013-09-03 09:24:21 PM
1 votes:

groppet: Thats one of the major issues I have as well the lack of critical thinking and it's not one generation it's people in everyone. I had one idiot call in a copy machine to the service because it was out of toner and they couldnt follow the simple instructions on the display to change it. The thing that pisses me off the most is my company will not let me be part of the hiring of people for my own damn staff. They send me the reject de jour and tell me that they are an "expert". Makes ya wanna go postal.


You have just delineated the precise idiocy of the imaginary line between "the people who do stuff with their hands" and "the people who are 'business' people".  You have also made the crux of this thread, the wellspring of incompetence and douchebaggery in the business world as being distributed along generational lines, moot and - pointed out the lack of interest that people have in the success of any department not reflecting upon their position as being inconsequential.  That's called undermining.  Thank you for that.  You just gave a 101  class on why corporate hooery is at best, farcical and at worst, a 30' tree blocking the road.
2013-09-03 08:13:29 PM
1 votes:

jayphat: if you're a marketing team, you are shiatting kittens to get that kind of return.


If you're a marketing team, you will also drive a steamroller over said kittens to sell crap even you don't like.  Marketing weenies.  They are to commerce what shyster lawyers are to litigation.
2013-09-03 08:12:28 PM
1 votes:

bunner: jayphat: change corporate America from the inside.

So, petrol and a Bic?


I love you Brits. Honest to god I do.
2013-09-03 08:05:53 PM
1 votes:
as a manager on the very fringe of the Gen Y spectrum, I don't agree that with the assessment as much as you just have a douche manager. I, personally, am working on my next promotion. actively. and my people know it. I'm also working on two of my peoples as well(I have 18 I'm responsible for). I won't sacrifice my people for my own gain. one, that gets nothing but resentment from your people. two, I want these people to emulate my ethics and do the same to their subordinates when they are in my position.

TL;DR: not all millenials are like this, change corporate America from the inside.
2013-09-03 08:01:49 PM
1 votes:

Lusiphur: Just FYI, Gen Y's parents are young boomers, not Gen Xers, for the most part, unless you have really really young parents.


No, just boomers proper.

Most Boomers held off having kids until their 30s (ie: the 80s), and that's when the Millenial baby boom began.
2013-09-03 07:29:06 PM
1 votes:

PsiChick: Gen X: The people who nearly started riots at your soccer games because you weren't playing enough, who gave you all the technology you wanted then biatched about you using it, who used TV to raise you, who never let you learn on your own and called you, in class, every ten minutes for 'safety reasons', destroyed the economy and job market...

And then blame you for feeling entitled to a stable economy, job market, and social safety net, and maybe a paid vacation once in a while.

/Seriously. Do you Gen X'ers even  realize how utterly douchebaggy you are? I'd prefer the company of a pants-below-the-butt retard who thinks 'swag' is vital and 'YOLO' is a life motto to someone who blames me for the choices they made.


Just FYI, Gen Y's parents are young boomers, not Gen Xers, for the most part, unless you have really really young parents.
2013-09-03 07:05:17 PM
1 votes:
I think they use this exact same article every generation, just moving each generation up a notch.

"Those darned elementary school children.  All they ever think about is recess.  They are not in any way like serious high school students, or determined college students.  What will become of society when the elementary school children are in college and they expect recess breaks all the time?  Woe is us."
2013-09-03 06:58:31 PM
1 votes:
Raises hand: Younger managers are cheaper and less jaded.

That is all.
2013-09-03 06:58:05 PM
1 votes:

Ivo Shandor: ph0rk: If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.

"Siri, what is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?"

/don't have an iPhone so I don't know if this works or not
//Wolfram Alpha got it wrong, but did understand "$20 in 1970 worth today"




Gas alone skews that.

How many cheeseburgers can you buy with that?
2013-09-03 06:36:21 PM
1 votes:

red5ish: Shazam999: 006deluxe: I'm always polite about it. A lot of our client base is made up of non-tech savvy end-users. I do cut a lot of slack. Sometimes people are in a hurry. Sometimes someone was delegated the task of fixing the problem and they don't even know where to start. Some people tried hard themselves and are just plain stumped. So it's not like I rue every call that I get and in general I'm very happy with my job. My gripes are mostly geared towards the professionals in the field that should know better.l

What is frustrating is the sheer amount of information that we make available in very prominent places that goes ignored. The amount of time and effort that went into making that information available in a manner that is easily accessed and easily digested by the customer is wasted if no one bothers to use it. When you get multiple calls/emails a day looking to download a template that someone would have had downright ignore to get the phone number or submit the form it gets old.

I understand.  Your website is not "wasted".  It fills a need for certain people.  Other people will phone.

Hey, we have the same thing here. 95% of our users understand our product very quickly.  4.99% need training that we gladly provide.  0.01% need us to hold their hand.  And that's fine, because those 0.01% are very, very grateful that they get to talk to someone that is fluent in English and can solve their problem. Believe me, it's a huge deal.

There is the old 80/20 rule which states that 20% of your customers take up 80% of your time. There is a strategy that suggests companies should "fire" those troublesome 20% and send them to their competitors. Sneaky but effective.


If you can charge the 20% more money, then they're not so troublesome.
2013-09-03 06:22:04 PM
1 votes:
FYI boomers: Just because generation Y regards cocaine as a hard drug and didn't walk around with a dusty nose for a decade doesn't make us lazy.

/it's actually all of the weed that's like 100x the quality of any of that brown Mexican brick garbage you had back in the day
//don't be jealous
2013-09-03 06:10:44 PM
1 votes:

006deluxe: I'm always polite about it. A lot of our client base is made up of non-tech savvy end-users. I do cut a lot of slack. Sometimes people are in a hurry. Sometimes someone was delegated the task of fixing the problem and they don't even know where to start. Some people tried hard themselves and are just plain stumped. So it's not like I rue every call that I get and in general I'm very happy with my job. My gripes are mostly geared towards the professionals in the field that should know better.l

What is frustrating is the sheer amount of information that we make available in very prominent places that goes ignored. The amount of time and effort that went into making that information available in a manner that is easily accessed and easily digested by the customer is wasted if no one bothers to use it. When you get multiple calls/emails a day looking to download a template that someone would have had downright ignore to get the phone number or submit the form it gets old.


I understand.  Your website is not "wasted".  It fills a need for certain people.  Other people will phone.

Hey, we have the same thing here. 95% of our users understand our product very quickly.  4.99% need training that we gladly provide.  0.01% need us to hold their hand.  And that's fine, because those 0.01% are very, very grateful that they get to talk to someone that is fluent in English and can solve their problem. Believe me, it's a huge deal.
2013-09-03 06:05:20 PM
1 votes:

Magnanimous_J: MrJesus: I am seriously going to start copying and pasting this.

I was born in 1983. Hulk Hogan and Reagan told me that communists were bad and trying to kill me. My maps and globes had the USSR on them. I remember "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall". I remember Saddam Hussein and READ MY LIPS, NO NEW TAXES. I was in freaking middle school when grunge peaked.  I was in college when the twin towers fell.

Do not lump me in with someone who grew up with cell phones, zero tolerance, dvrs, and the internet.

Jerks.

The kids coming up now will never understand that feeling of discovering a wrinkly, waterlogged stash of penthouse magazines in the woods. They will never know what it's like to watch the Spice Channel through the scrambler.


Amen, brother. We had to work for our pr0n.
2013-09-03 05:51:22 PM
1 votes:

Lusiphur: We ended up firing a client that my company was managing the marketing for because her in-house staff resented us being in charge and refused to do the work assigned to them. The client ended up crashing and burning very shortly afterwards, so there was some good new


You "fired" a client? Or did you just stop doing business with them? Just wondering. Also keep in mind that the story is reporting on a survey of workplace opinions, it is not making any actual statement about Gen Y itself. The only statement they are really saying is "Hey, here's this survey. The results are so skewed and pervasive against Gen Y that experts we spoke to say there is almost certainly something more substantive there than just spite and bias."

Glad you're not my manager, your reading comprehension flat sucks, I want my boss to actually be able to understand what he's read.
2013-09-03 05:39:02 PM
1 votes:
12349876: ...People knew how to fix cars more in the past because they broke down all the time.

Well, somewhat. There's also the issue of complexity. Take a look under the hood of most cars from 1970, for example, and compare them to cars from 2000. The engine compartment is crammed full of stuff and 90% of it requires specialized equipment to read off the scan codes just to figure out what's wrong.
2013-09-03 05:31:53 PM
1 votes:

r1niceboy: What to do when a younger boss throws you under the bus and you lose your job: Apply for unemployment and get turned down. Appeal and call that boss as a witness. Ask them difficult questions you can prove in writing, and when they perjure themselves, sue the company using the transcript of the hearing as evidence.

It worked for me. I got a payout, and the brown-nosing satan-skank of a boss got fired. None of this would have happened if I'd been treated fairly.

/Sleeps just fine at night


Yeah, that's one approach.  I still remember when you just showed up, did what you did, made it work and cashed  your check  without all the K Mart power struggles.  There's something to be said for the dignity of that, IMHO.  I believe that as soon as your workplace turns into some soap opera pissing match of passive aggressive shenanigans, your workplace is full of people who have very little to offer the company other than keeping the serfs in line.
2013-09-03 05:26:48 PM
1 votes:
Citing a study and not linking to that study is piss-poor journalism. Was it some sort of survey? Who were the respondents? What was the respondents' demographic?  How big a group was surveyed? What questions were asked? Was it limited to the USA or did it cover other countries?
Sweeping generalizations and anecdotal evidence don't constitute valid support for conclusions.
Kelley Holland, your blog sucks.
2013-09-03 05:13:36 PM
1 votes:
Just applied for a job in a larger city with a substantial pay increase doing the same thing I've been doing the past 4 years.  I'm beyond qualified for the meat and potatoes requirements of the job, only thing is I know I won't get it because I don't have any professional work experience with HTML code.

I can imagine some dickhead Gen Y kid being the project manager.

I'm guessing posting pictures to fark doesn't count as the kind of experience they're looking for, but it was worth the effort and took up room on the resume. Fingers are crossed the HR person is a fellow farker.
2013-09-03 05:12:50 PM
1 votes:
www.lamebook.com
2013-09-03 04:59:14 PM
1 votes:

give me doughnuts: What the hell is a "culturally competent team"?

Is it because you included the Indian guy, and are making him do all the work?


It means you can get them to kiss your ass by playing their on their fears of seeming insensitive and then paying them off each other.
2013-09-03 04:33:51 PM
1 votes:

imgod2u: To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.


That might have been extreme examples but I've seen my peers unable to directly access a webpage or confused by pop-up ads made to look like AV warnings. Too much clicking without thinking. My feelings about social media can be summed up by The Onion
2013-09-03 04:28:48 PM
1 votes:

zedster: FTA:The good news is that Gen Y members are perceived as tech savvy, and smart about ways to leverage social media

Social Media != tech savvy

The number of people my age I know who are inept when it comes to computers and tech is amazing. Oh! I might have to reboot my desktop after I've left a java filled website running for a week? What's that scarey looking black and white text screen?

The ability to upload a video to Facebook is nothing on the tech scale. Most people don't know the first thing about how their microwaves work let alone their computer. It like arguing that a good driver makes a good mechanic. I wonder how many can even create an Excel sheet with formulas?

I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?

//the term leverage needs to be binned from it's current usage
///going to leverage the cloud to increase synergy as a value proposition to achieve six sigma


We were setting up our new work stations a few months back and I figured "Hey let the kids set them up because they know everything" Two hours later and they managed to figure out how to open the boxes and get everything unwrapped. These things came with instructions and they had everything color coordinated.  Each of the 4 stations should have taken 15 min max to set up. Watching them change a tire gave me hours of enjoyment.
2013-09-03 04:24:42 PM
1 votes:

skozlaw: So, basically, the 80s is back minus the goofy hair and shiatty music.

Wait.... Miley Cyrus....

So, basically, the 80s is back.


Wake me when the 90's are back when it was acceptable to dress like a hobo
2013-09-03 04:22:50 PM
1 votes:
So, basically, the 80s is back minus the goofy hair and shiatty music.

Wait.... Miley Cyrus....

So, basically, the 80s is back.

Russ1642: I cringe whenever someone uses the word synergy. I'm not cut out for management.


The talking for the sake of talking is what gets me. As a tech guy my bias is toward action, but if we're going to talk I want to at least talk in solid, meaningful ways using quantifying terms. This bullshiat where some people manage to employed solely for the sake of being employed drives me nuts.
2013-09-03 04:22:35 PM
1 votes:
"Kids these days!" - Adults every generation
2013-09-03 04:15:16 PM
1 votes:
yay capitalism
2013-09-03 04:09:25 PM
1 votes:

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Rev.K: I'm 34 and I'm not a manager.

Where did I go wrong?

Nearly 31, and never want to be a people manager.


yep, i never want to manage people or make decisions.  i love project management!  my group tends to just get re-orged instead of fired.
2013-09-03 03:56:00 PM
1 votes:

Intrepid00: DamnYankees: What's Generation Y again? Is that me?

It tells you in article.


I can't be bothered to read that. Laziness in clicking is a trait of whatever generation I'm a part of.
2013-09-03 02:16:26 PM
1 votes:

Rev.K: I'm 34 and I'm not a manager.

Where did I go wrong?


Nearly 31, and never want to be a people manager.
 
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