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(Today)   Researchers dismayed to find that Gen Y employees are the first to figure out how corporate America really works. I'd finish this headline, but I just got thrown under the bus by Steve in Accounting   (today.com) divider line 232
    More: Obvious, Gen Y, Ernst & Young  
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17204 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Sep 2013 at 4:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-03 05:35:39 PM

Guntram Shatterhand: The whole generational nonsense is stupid and haphazard anyway and only serves to fill space and satisfy various bias held by people who can't enjoy life.


Bing.  According to demographic studies, different people are different ages at different times.  The vast and mind collection of pigeonholes we need to stuff each other into are largely designed to keep us hating each other's guts or feeling entitled / disenfranchised or somehow smugly superior.  I have never felt the need to subscribe to any of the sociocultural nano slices of allegiance that are drummed up constantly, or to sew one of their patches on my coat sleeve.
 
2013-09-03 05:36:55 PM

006deluxe: RottNDude: And these "gen y" people are why I make good money on my own time, since they're too lazy to RTFM. I have nothing to complain about.

/tech savvy
//why yes you can pay me to plug that in for you.

People neglecting to RTFM crosses generational boundaries. It also goes well beyond the literal RFTM.

I'm 27. I'm a customer service/tech support rep at a company that makes audio equipment. The amount of calls and emails I get as a result of a person just being too lazy poke around on our website or throw a quick query into Google astounds me. The amount of information that is accessible in this day and age is incredible, yet people don't bother even dipping their toes into the pool for fear they might actually learn something. This holds true for people of all ages.

There is also a decided lack of critical thinking ability among the people I deal with. There have been countless times that I have dealt with "professionals", many of whom are employed by very large companies, who don't understand that the more variables you can remove from the equation the easier it will be to find the cause of the problem. Granted, sometimes you might not be able to pare things down as far as you'd like, but to not understand why it should be attempted is inexcusable. This is beyond basic and applicable outside of tech problems.

Along with this, I constantly get people who aren't even willing to attempt to troubleshoot a problem. I have customers that would rather spend hundreds of dollars in fees and downtime with equipment than take the piece, hook it up, and work with me to do a little troubleshooting to find out if the problem is legit.

My job is to help people and I'm fine with that. I think part of the reason why I'm good at this job is that I'm very good at maintaining an even keel outwardly even if internally I'm seething with rage. I guess I just don't get why people would rather rely on other people to fix their problems rather than putting in a little effort to fi ...


So, you're complaining that you have a job because some people prefer to talk to a real live person for help?

Dude, you helping customers builds an immense amount of goodwill (assuming you actually give the correct answer and you're polite about it).  This is what makes companies retain and build their customer base.  But hey, keep whining.
 
2013-09-03 05:38:56 PM

ph0rk: If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.


"Siri, what is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?"

/don't have an iPhone so I don't know if this works or not
//Wolfram Alpha got it wrong, but did understand "$20 in 1970 worth today"
 
2013-09-03 05:39:02 PM
12349876: ...People knew how to fix cars more in the past because they broke down all the time.

Well, somewhat. There's also the issue of complexity. Take a look under the hood of most cars from 1970, for example, and compare them to cars from 2000. The engine compartment is crammed full of stuff and 90% of it requires specialized equipment to read off the scan codes just to figure out what's wrong.
 
2013-09-03 05:41:05 PM

Tigger: The short answer to your question is that this study is meaningless if it isn't longitudinal. EVERYONE thinks the generation beneath them are lazy shiftless ne'erdowells.


My point exactly. Especially when someone half your age is appointed to oversee your department.

Shazam999: Like, all the boomers? I hate to tell you this but everybody that runs a business gets idiot clients.  This isn't a Gen Y problem.  It's a people without brains problem.

Unlike you, I find idiots exist at all ages.  I don't find Gen Y people particularly smarter or dumber.


Are you saying it's impossible that certain generations grew up in an environment that molded the way they think, thus making it more likely that certain cohorts would be dumber/smarter? I would disagree. Especially when it comes to technology. I find that older people, when introduced to a technological evolution, are more likely to grasp on to its possibilities for enhancing their lives than boomers are.
 
2013-09-03 05:41:29 PM

groppet: We were setting up our new work stations a few months back and I figured "Hey let the kids set them up because they know everything" Two hours later and they managed to figure out how to open the boxes and get everything unwrapped. These things came with instructions and they had everything color coordinated. Each of the 4 stations should have taken 15 min max to set up. Watching them change a tire gave me hours of enjoyment.


its even more fun when you think that they all make way more than you do!
 
2013-09-03 05:44:01 PM

Ivo Shandor: ph0rk: If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.

"Siri, what is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?"

/don't have an iPhone so I don't know if this works or not
//Wolfram Alpha got it wrong, but did understand "$20 in 1970 worth today"


116.00.  Progress!
 
2013-09-03 05:45:05 PM

Lusiphur: Tigger: The short answer to your question is that this study is meaningless if it isn't longitudinal. EVERYONE thinks the generation beneath them are lazy shiftless ne'erdowells.

My point exactly. Especially when someone half your age is appointed to oversee your department.

Shazam999: Like, all the boomers? I hate to tell you this but everybody that runs a business gets idiot clients.  This isn't a Gen Y problem.  It's a people without brains problem.

Unlike you, I find idiots exist at all ages.  I don't find Gen Y people particularly smarter or dumber.

Are you saying it's impossible that certain generations grew up in an environment that molded the way they think, thus making it more likely that certain cohorts would be dumber/smarter? I would disagree. Especially when it comes to technology. I find that older people, when introduced to a technological evolution, are more likely to grasp on to its possibilities for enhancing their lives than boomers are.


Older people?  So that's why Schmidt was brought into Google.
 
2013-09-03 05:47:46 PM

groppet: We were setting up our new work stations a few months back and I figured "Hey let the kids set them up because they know everything" Two hours later and they managed to figure out how to open the boxes and get everything unwrapped.


Are you taking into account the apparent fact that people can no longer remove a thing from a box without making a 10 minute YouTube video out of the process?
 
2013-09-03 05:48:40 PM
I find that any given individual will or will not be able to grasp any given construct according to their abilities and education.  Oddly.
 
2013-09-03 05:50:18 PM

Shazam999: 006deluxe: RottNDude: And these "gen y" people are why I make good money on my own time, since they're too lazy to RTFM. I have nothing to complain about.

/tech savvy
//why yes you can pay me to plug that in for you.

People neglecting to RTFM crosses generational boundaries. It also goes well beyond the literal RFTM.

I'm 27. I'm a customer service/tech support rep at a company that makes audio equipment. The amount of calls and emails I get as a result of a person just being too lazy poke around on our website or throw a quick query into Google astounds me. The amount of information that is accessible in this day and age is incredible, yet people don't bother even dipping their toes into the pool for fear they might actually learn something. This holds true for people of all ages.

There is also a decided lack of critical thinking ability among the people I deal with. There have been countless times that I have dealt with "professionals", many of whom are employed by very large companies, who don't understand that the more variables you can remove from the equation the easier it will be to find the cause of the problem. Granted, sometimes you might not be able to pare things down as far as you'd like, but to not understand why it should be attempted is inexcusable. This is beyond basic and applicable outside of tech problems.

Along with this, I constantly get people who aren't even willing to attempt to troubleshoot a problem. I have customers that would rather spend hundreds of dollars in fees and downtime with equipment than take the piece, hook it up, and work with me to do a little troubleshooting to find out if the problem is legit.

My job is to help people and I'm fine with that. I think part of the reason why I'm good at this job is that I'm very good at maintaining an even keel outwardly even if internally I'm seething with rage. I guess I just don't get why people would rather rely on other people to fix their problems rather than putting in a little e ...


I'm always polite about it. A lot of our client base is made up of non-tech savvy end-users. I do cut a lot of slack. Sometimes people are in a hurry. Sometimes someone was delegated the task of fixing the problem and they don't even know where to start. Some people tried hard themselves and are just plain stumped. So it's not like I rue every call that I get and in general I'm very happy with my job. My gripes are mostly geared towards the professionals in the field that should know better.l

What is frustrating is the sheer amount of information that we make available in very prominent places that goes ignored. The amount of time and effort that went into making that information available in a manner that is easily accessed and easily digested by the customer is wasted if no one bothers to use it. When you get multiple calls/emails a day looking to download a template that someone would have had downright ignore to get the phone number or submit the form it gets old.
 
2013-09-03 05:50:55 PM
I am seriously going to start copying and pasting this.

I was born in 1983. Hulk Hogan and Reagan told me that communists were bad and trying to kill me. My maps and globes had the USSR on them. I remember "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall". I remember Saddam Hussein and READ MY LIPS, NO NEW TAXES. I was in freaking middle school when grunge peaked.  I was in college when the twin towers fell.

Do not lump me in with someone who grew up with cell phones, zero tolerance, dvrs, and the internet.

Jerks.
 
2013-09-03 05:51:22 PM

Lusiphur: We ended up firing a client that my company was managing the marketing for because her in-house staff resented us being in charge and refused to do the work assigned to them. The client ended up crashing and burning very shortly afterwards, so there was some good new


You "fired" a client? Or did you just stop doing business with them? Just wondering. Also keep in mind that the story is reporting on a survey of workplace opinions, it is not making any actual statement about Gen Y itself. The only statement they are really saying is "Hey, here's this survey. The results are so skewed and pervasive against Gen Y that experts we spoke to say there is almost certainly something more substantive there than just spite and bias."

Glad you're not my manager, your reading comprehension flat sucks, I want my boss to actually be able to understand what he's read.
 
2013-09-03 05:51:57 PM

bunner: I find that any given individual will or will not be able to grasp any given construct according to their abilities and education.  Oddly.


Party pooper
 
2013-09-03 05:56:22 PM
I can assemble, rack, loom and I/O configure a rack of blades from components in my sleep.  I can't write the code for the motherf*ckers, but when somebody who can shows up, they'll work.  People don't pay me to do this because I'm over 50.  The brave new world is mostly people basing job reviews on biases and whose ass gets kissed along the correct bias lines.  So, yeah, cowards waving their "but, see, I'm young and I know what's what" flags.  If you all agree that the older uncool people "can't possibly understand" ~n, it helps to keep your ass from hanging out when you hire one.  Because you don't.  Because older people don't get it.  *snort*
 
2013-09-03 05:58:03 PM

Space Station Wagon: bunner: I find that any given individual will or will not be able to grasp any given construct according to their abilities and education.  Oddly.

Party pooper


That's NAZI party pooper, to you, little mister.   :  )
 
2013-09-03 05:59:52 PM

Lusiphur: I'm 29 and I've been put into managerial and leadership positions above people twice my age. From my experience (which is not statistically significant, mind you, but worth mentioning), the boomers twice my age were the most recalcitrant, difficult, conniving, and petty employees I have ever worked with.



images.tvrage.com
                        Make the noise, Bundy
 
2013-09-03 06:00:31 PM

ZombieBear: imgod2u: Space Station Wagon: What tasks? Not any that pay. (Well there may be one social media seat at each company)
Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.

I think you grossly overestimate the number of positions that require spreadsheets or anything of the sort. Discounting manual labor and service jobs (the majority), even office work often involve no more than email, write-ups, dictation, copy/mail and keeping/organizing a schedule.

Actually, teaching a manager excelle here has made their jobs easier and require less paperwork from us. Excelle is an underrated management tool that needs to be used more often for tracking metrics and the like in meaningful ways. It is not so much needed for office jobs, but middle management anywhere can find uses for excelle.


Oh, there's no question that being able to master complex spreadsheets with equations and formulas can help improve efficiency in all sorts of areas. Hell, the janitor could probably keep track of peak poop time with a mobile app to better anticipate when to clean the stalls more frequently and when he can take a break and fark some kinky office chicks.

But the point is, it's not required today. Most jobs are tedious and filled with 99% busywork.
 
2013-09-03 06:01:07 PM

bunner: I can assemble, rack, loom and I/O configure a rack of blades from components in my sleep.  I can't write the code for the motherf*ckers, but when somebody who can shows up, they'll work.  People don't pay me to do this because I'm over 50.  The brave new world is mostly people basing job reviews on biases and whose ass gets kissed along the correct bias lines.  So, yeah, cowards waving their "but, see, I'm young and I know what's what" flags.  If you all agree that the older uncool people "can't possibly understand" ~n, it helps to keep your ass from hanging out when you hire one.  Because you don't.  Because older people don't get it.  *snort*


Attaboy! Thats the Fark spirit!
 
2013-09-03 06:03:17 PM
Lusipher:From my experience (which is not statistically significant, mind you, but worth mentioning), the boomers twice my age were the most recalcitrant, difficult, conniving, and petty employees I have ever worked with.

I can see where people who weren't raised to stick their lips against any ass stuck in their face could be perceived as problematic.
 
2013-09-03 06:04:00 PM

Space Station Wagon: Attaboy! Thats the Fark spirit!


No it isn't.   :  )
 
2013-09-03 06:04:02 PM

MrJesus: I am seriously going to start copying and pasting this.

I was born in 1983. Hulk Hogan and Reagan told me that communists were bad and trying to kill me. My maps and globes had the USSR on them. I remember "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall". I remember Saddam Hussein and READ MY LIPS, NO NEW TAXES. I was in freaking middle school when grunge peaked.  I was in college when the twin towers fell.

Do not lump me in with someone who grew up with cell phones, zero tolerance, dvrs, and the internet.

Jerks.


The kids coming up now will never understand that feeling of discovering a wrinkly, waterlogged stash of penthouse magazines in the woods. They will never know what it's like to watch the Spice Channel through the scrambler.
 
2013-09-03 06:05:20 PM

Magnanimous_J: MrJesus: I am seriously going to start copying and pasting this.

I was born in 1983. Hulk Hogan and Reagan told me that communists were bad and trying to kill me. My maps and globes had the USSR on them. I remember "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall". I remember Saddam Hussein and READ MY LIPS, NO NEW TAXES. I was in freaking middle school when grunge peaked.  I was in college when the twin towers fell.

Do not lump me in with someone who grew up with cell phones, zero tolerance, dvrs, and the internet.

Jerks.

The kids coming up now will never understand that feeling of discovering a wrinkly, waterlogged stash of penthouse magazines in the woods. They will never know what it's like to watch the Spice Channel through the scrambler.


Amen, brother. We had to work for our pr0n.
 
2013-09-03 06:07:28 PM
"Jayden in accounting..."
 
2013-09-03 06:10:44 PM

006deluxe: I'm always polite about it. A lot of our client base is made up of non-tech savvy end-users. I do cut a lot of slack. Sometimes people are in a hurry. Sometimes someone was delegated the task of fixing the problem and they don't even know where to start. Some people tried hard themselves and are just plain stumped. So it's not like I rue every call that I get and in general I'm very happy with my job. My gripes are mostly geared towards the professionals in the field that should know better.l

What is frustrating is the sheer amount of information that we make available in very prominent places that goes ignored. The amount of time and effort that went into making that information available in a manner that is easily accessed and easily digested by the customer is wasted if no one bothers to use it. When you get multiple calls/emails a day looking to download a template that someone would have had downright ignore to get the phone number or submit the form it gets old.


I understand.  Your website is not "wasted".  It fills a need for certain people.  Other people will phone.

Hey, we have the same thing here. 95% of our users understand our product very quickly.  4.99% need training that we gladly provide.  0.01% need us to hold their hand.  And that's fine, because those 0.01% are very, very grateful that they get to talk to someone that is fluent in English and can solve their problem. Believe me, it's a huge deal.
 
2013-09-03 06:11:35 PM

jankyboy: Amen, brother. We had to work for our pr0n.


It's always funny to me how one era's perceived limitations or inconveniences are another era's cultural benchmarks.  I think we just forget to be feel good about figuring out stuff on our own.
 
2013-09-03 06:19:01 PM

Shazam999: 006deluxe: I'm always polite about it. A lot of our client base is made up of non-tech savvy end-users. I do cut a lot of slack. Sometimes people are in a hurry. Sometimes someone was delegated the task of fixing the problem and they don't even know where to start. Some people tried hard themselves and are just plain stumped. So it's not like I rue every call that I get and in general I'm very happy with my job. My gripes are mostly geared towards the professionals in the field that should know better.l

What is frustrating is the sheer amount of information that we make available in very prominent places that goes ignored. The amount of time and effort that went into making that information available in a manner that is easily accessed and easily digested by the customer is wasted if no one bothers to use it. When you get multiple calls/emails a day looking to download a template that someone would have had downright ignore to get the phone number or submit the form it gets old.

I understand.  Your website is not "wasted".  It fills a need for certain people.  Other people will phone.

Hey, we have the same thing here. 95% of our users understand our product very quickly.  4.99% need training that we gladly provide.  0.01% need us to hold their hand.  And that's fine, because those 0.01% are very, very grateful that they get to talk to someone that is fluent in English and can solve their problem. Believe me, it's a huge deal.


There is the old 80/20 rule which states that 20% of your customers take up 80% of your time. There is a strategy that suggests companies should "fire" those troublesome 20% and send them to their competitors. Sneaky but effective.
 
2013-09-03 06:19:21 PM
Young people are stupid. Har Har.
 
2013-09-03 06:22:04 PM
FYI boomers: Just because generation Y regards cocaine as a hard drug and didn't walk around with a dusty nose for a decade doesn't make us lazy.

/it's actually all of the weed that's like 100x the quality of any of that brown Mexican brick garbage you had back in the day
//don't be jealous
 
2013-09-03 06:24:50 PM
I remember early in my career, fresh out of university,  being the youngest guy by ten years or more, put in to work with a team of older guys who'd been around a while.  Theoretically by job title I was now their boss, but our supervisor never allowed me to pull rank like that; I had to win them over for any collective enterprise we did, and run things by consensus.  So I did. It took weeks of patiently explaining why I was asking to do something a new way ("from that there book-larnin' school, damn college boy"), but they eventually saw that I actually knew my stuff, I had  a theoretical basis for everything I asked them to do,  and that what I asked them to do had positive results, which made the team look good, and we eventually got along great. The process helped me improve my listening skills and increased my empathy at the same time, so we built a good team with high esprit d'corps. It's at the point now where when we work as a team, it looks like we run by telepathy; everybody knows their role, anybody can make a suggestion, and consensus is quick.

Nowadays, I'm at the other end of the same telescope: I have to work under the commands and approvals of 20-something kids who weren't even old enough to drive when I was already an old hand at the job... and I marvel how little they seem to have learned from their school, compared to my day.  They never surprise me by seeming smarter than I am, they often ask painfully dumb questions that reveal a lack of background I find frightening. They are coming out measurably dumber, IMO.

I do get a strong sense of what has been mentioned earlier, that anything more than ten (hell, five) years back is buried with the dinos and irrelevant, as far as they are concerned, and that they think they're inventing old things for the first time, every day.  They also demonstrate reduced empathy and communication skill, preferring to keep their noses in their smartphones at all times, to just talking things over. They don't think of the crew they're working with any differently than they consider the waitstaff at their coffee shop.

So, I guess this is karmic payback to my own youth, but at least I grew from the experience and became better in a short time.  These kids today... I worry.
 
2013-09-03 06:31:04 PM
Every generation prides itself on what it has managed to throw away from the previous generation, cause, "Gahhhhhd, so stupid!1".  This is usually followed by the brief period of "oops, sh*t" and the people who notice that some of that old crap was necessary and revive it manage to get elected to political office for being "practical and level headed", and this allows them to get huge amounts of money from lobbyists and retire in comfort.  It's the American dream.  This time, we've thrown pretty much the bathwater, the baby and the tub out and replaced them with a filing system.  So now, we aspire to be a nation of file clerks.  I can't WAIT to see how this one turns out.   :  )
 
2013-09-03 06:33:12 PM

Zeno-25: FYI boomers: Just because generation Y regards cocaine as a hard drug and didn't walk around with a dusty nose for a decade doesn't make us lazy.

/it's actually all of the weed that's like 100x the quality of any of that brown Mexican brick garbage you had back in the day
//don't be jealous


So, dope as an achievement unlocked when blowing smirk at a generation that was all f*cked up about... dope.  Wow.
 
2013-09-03 06:36:21 PM

red5ish: Shazam999: 006deluxe: I'm always polite about it. A lot of our client base is made up of non-tech savvy end-users. I do cut a lot of slack. Sometimes people are in a hurry. Sometimes someone was delegated the task of fixing the problem and they don't even know where to start. Some people tried hard themselves and are just plain stumped. So it's not like I rue every call that I get and in general I'm very happy with my job. My gripes are mostly geared towards the professionals in the field that should know better.l

What is frustrating is the sheer amount of information that we make available in very prominent places that goes ignored. The amount of time and effort that went into making that information available in a manner that is easily accessed and easily digested by the customer is wasted if no one bothers to use it. When you get multiple calls/emails a day looking to download a template that someone would have had downright ignore to get the phone number or submit the form it gets old.

I understand.  Your website is not "wasted".  It fills a need for certain people.  Other people will phone.

Hey, we have the same thing here. 95% of our users understand our product very quickly.  4.99% need training that we gladly provide.  0.01% need us to hold their hand.  And that's fine, because those 0.01% are very, very grateful that they get to talk to someone that is fluent in English and can solve their problem. Believe me, it's a huge deal.

There is the old 80/20 rule which states that 20% of your customers take up 80% of your time. There is a strategy that suggests companies should "fire" those troublesome 20% and send them to their competitors. Sneaky but effective.


If you can charge the 20% more money, then they're not so troublesome.
 
2013-09-03 06:37:24 PM

LasersHurt: Being good at a job no longer entitles you to good wages and a strong career. You have to be able and willing to aggressively pursue career changes and promotions if you want to make real money.

It sucks, but it's the way things are in a lot of places.


Which propagates itself in fewer houses built and sold (and all that goes with them), lower birthrates, less long-term investment, and an overall lack of permanence along with the shrinking middle class. They may have more of money, but never settle down to spend it or live with it. What helped to create the middle class in this country is not just higher wages and better working conditions, but the societal shifts that allowed people to stay put and invest where they were, in one place. Without that, our future economy is screwed as people constantly roam the country and the world, bouncing from job to job to job every few years and never coming "home"... because they have none. Or rather, they never made one.
 
2013-09-03 06:54:57 PM
Nice to see greed and selfishness is still tending well.

Worked so well for your parents and grandparents, but this time for sure!
 
2013-09-03 06:55:41 PM

Shazam999: If you can charge the 20% more money, then they're not so troublesome.


If they account for 80% of your expenses then you may have to charge a LOT, but your point is well taken. I'm sure it is advisable to evaluate situations with more than just a 'rule of thumb' strategy.
 
2013-09-03 06:56:42 PM
They're only douchebags because that's what they're taught to be in MBA school. They buy into it wholesale because of the upper middle class lifestyle that comes with it. We are not a nice species.

/ 20+ years in business, seen enough
 
2013-09-03 06:56:52 PM

DamnYankees: LasersHurt: Being good at a job no longer entitles you to good wages and a strong career. You have to be able and willing to aggressively pursue career changes and promotions if you want to make real money.

It sucks, but it's the way things are in a lot of places.

It's the result of our move from a wage-based economy to an asset-based economy. Happened under Reagan and has never stopped, and its caused serious, serious issues.


I'd say it has more to do with the greater percentage of profits and wages going to management today as compared to 30 years ago.
 
2013-09-03 06:58:05 PM

Ivo Shandor: ph0rk: If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.

"Siri, what is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?"

/don't have an iPhone so I don't know if this works or not
//Wolfram Alpha got it wrong, but did understand "$20 in 1970 worth today"




Gas alone skews that.

How many cheeseburgers can you buy with that?
 
2013-09-03 06:58:31 PM
Raises hand: Younger managers are cheaper and less jaded.

That is all.
 
2013-09-03 07:04:05 PM

OptionC: imgod2u: Tech savvy != knowing the inner workings of a computer.

To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell.

Hold on, so basic Excel skills and simple command line operations are considered "knowing the inner workings of a computer" nowadays?

Yikes.


The amount of stuff you needed to know to maintain a computer in working condition has fallen substantially in the last decade. So, yeah. It does. You're lucky if someone knows how to plug-in a thumb drive.
 
2013-09-03 07:05:17 PM
I think they use this exact same article every generation, just moving each generation up a notch.

"Those darned elementary school children.  All they ever think about is recess.  They are not in any way like serious high school students, or determined college students.  What will become of society when the elementary school children are in college and they expect recess breaks all the time?  Woe is us."
 
2013-09-03 07:12:28 PM
Most of them don't get paid shiat, they hump a chicken called Reward for Service. LOL
 
2013-09-03 07:14:49 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: zedster: FTA:The good news is that Gen Y members are perceived as tech savvy, and smart about ways to leverage social media

Social Media != tech savvy

The number of people my age I know who are inept when it comes to computers and tech is amazing. Oh! I might have to reboot my desktop after I've left a java filled website running for a week? What's that scarey looking black and white text screen?

The ability to upload a video to Facebook is nothing on the tech scale. Most people don't know the first thing about how their microwaves work let alone their computer. It like arguing that a good driver makes a good mechanic. I wonder how many can even create an Excel sheet with formulas?

It's a popular myth that young people alllll know about everything about computers. I blew some minds one day by pressing shift-ctrl-K in Firefox then clicking on the cube....

I left it like that for the kids to enjoy.


Like impressing grandma by moving her heavy* furniture.


*what one's frail grandma would consider heavy.
 
2013-09-03 07:15:41 PM

bunner: Every generation prides itself on what it has managed to throw away from the previous generation, cause, "Gahhhhhd, so stupid!1".  This is usually followed by the brief period of "oops, sh*t" and the people who notice that some of that old crap was necessary and revive it manage to get elected to political office for being "practical and level headed", and this allows them to get huge amounts of money from lobbyists and retire in comfort.  It's the American dream.  This time, we've thrown pretty much the bathwater, the baby and the tub out and replaced them with a filing system.  So now, we aspire to be a nation of file clerks.  I can't WAIT to see how this one turns out.   :  )


So bring back rotary phones and teletype machines?
 
2013-09-03 07:16:31 PM

zedster: 12349876: I think mostly it's a fact that the user interface has become so friendly. It used to take some critical thinking to use a computer and now you don't really need it. Same for cars. People knew how to fix cars more in the past because they broke down all the time.

Advanced GUI's play some role but there is no excuse for not knowing the address bar from the search bar or the difference between HTTP and HTTPS by the time you enter the work force assuming you enter in an educated role.

3rd most searched term of all time on Google is Google because people don't understand how a search bar works
Google Trends Top 10 results


If you really want to blow their minds
 
2013-09-03 07:17:22 PM
"Good job, buddy!  Good job!"  Some "I read all the success books" butterhead I mixed hundreds of shows for used to hand me that crap.  I told him to can it.  "Well then what should I say?"  "How about 'thank you'?"  Simple courtesy.  The weakness of of the old!  *snort*
 
2013-09-03 07:19:51 PM

fusillade762: So bring back rotary phones and teletype machines?


You know, of all the kneejerk assumptions, false equivalencies are my favorite.  Let me buy you a beer.

i.istockimg.com
 
2013-09-03 07:23:22 PM
Gen Y bosses: entitled and out for themselves, study says


Didn't need that word in the headline.
 
2013-09-03 07:25:33 PM

Shostie: "YOU, ALRIGHT! I LEARNED IT BY WATCHING YOU!"


I know I'm late to the thread, but thank you so much for this.  I came in here just for this and there it was, in blaring font, as the second post of the thread.  God bless you.
 
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