If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Today)   Researchers dismayed to find that Gen Y employees are the first to figure out how corporate America really works. I'd finish this headline, but I just got thrown under the bus by Steve in Accounting   (today.com) divider line 232
    More: Obvious, Gen Y, Ernst & Young  
•       •       •

17199 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Sep 2013 at 4:03 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



232 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-03 04:28:48 PM

zedster: FTA:The good news is that Gen Y members are perceived as tech savvy, and smart about ways to leverage social media

Social Media != tech savvy

The number of people my age I know who are inept when it comes to computers and tech is amazing. Oh! I might have to reboot my desktop after I've left a java filled website running for a week? What's that scarey looking black and white text screen?

The ability to upload a video to Facebook is nothing on the tech scale. Most people don't know the first thing about how their microwaves work let alone their computer. It like arguing that a good driver makes a good mechanic. I wonder how many can even create an Excel sheet with formulas?

I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?

//the term leverage needs to be binned from it's current usage
///going to leverage the cloud to increase synergy as a value proposition to achieve six sigma


We were setting up our new work stations a few months back and I figured "Hey let the kids set them up because they know everything" Two hours later and they managed to figure out how to open the boxes and get everything unwrapped. These things came with instructions and they had everything color coordinated.  Each of the 4 stations should have taken 15 min max to set up. Watching them change a tire gave me hours of enjoyment.
 
2013-09-03 04:28:59 PM

imgod2u: Tech savvy != knowing the inner workings of a computer.

To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.


While this may be true, the world is still filled with people (of all ages) who couldn't google the directions out of a wet paper bag. A bit part of knowledge is knowing what you don't know and knowing how to find it. Crafting good search engine queries is a critical job skill and students fail at it again and again.

If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.
 
2013-09-03 04:29:35 PM
What the hell is a "culturally competent team"?

Is it because you included the Indian guy, and are making him do all the work?
 
2013-09-03 04:30:18 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Most jobs just amount to theater performances. We have so much technology and so many resources, it's impossible to have real jobs for everyone anymore. Instead of choosing to build a leisure society in which everyone benefits from our technology, we've built a society in which most people are just there to transfer money between m/billionaires.


Well said.
+1 Internets for you
 
2013-09-03 04:31:13 PM
Working for a wage is a sucker's bet anyway. The real reason that money management skills aren't taught in High School is that the entire system depends on generation after generation of wage earners voluntarily enslaving themselves and trading their finite lives for some toys that they are too exhausted to enjoy.


Gen Y, having grown up during an age of popular anti-heroes and unchecked corporate greed are nothing more than product of their environment. If they are selfish and entitled, that's only because that's the most production survival strategy.
 
2013-09-03 04:31:56 PM

ph0rk: If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.


$120.48
 
2013-09-03 04:32:01 PM

INeedAName: As someone who just got hired on as a program director, for a substantial pay increase, I laugh at your inability to synergize, an upscale, out of the box paradigm, with company cross pollination.

/Actually it's summer camp and retreat center which basically means I'm going to get paid to run around in the woods, play with boats, and hit kids in the face with dodgeballs!
//Life is good.


fc09.deviantart.net
 
2013-09-03 04:33:51 PM

imgod2u: To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.


That might have been extreme examples but I've seen my peers unable to directly access a webpage or confused by pop-up ads made to look like AV warnings. Too much clicking without thinking. My feelings about social media can be summed up by The Onion
 
2013-09-03 04:36:17 PM

ph0rk: imgod2u: Tech savvy != knowing the inner workings of a computer.

To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.

While this may be true, the world is still filled with people (of all ages) who couldn't google the directions out of a wet paper bag. A bit part of knowledge is knowing what you don't know and knowing how to find it. Crafting good search engine queries is a critical job skill and students fail at it again and again.

If I say something like "What is $20 in 1970 worth in today's dollars?" I expect one person in a room of 20 holding laptops to be able to figure it out in under five minutes. That's sad.


Most probably will, but not in the way you think. I bet at least a few will text/facebook message/tweet this and get a response from their Google-fu-powered friends in under five minutes. Especially if they're a cute girl.
 
2013-09-03 04:37:27 PM

zedster: imgod2u: To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.

That might have been extreme examples but I've seen my peers unable to directly access a webpage or confused by pop-up ads made to look like AV warnings. Too much clicking without thinking. My feelings about social media can be summed up by The Onion


Most of that isn't a problem on tablets and smartphones. Which is the majority of computing devices being used today.
 
2013-09-03 04:38:31 PM

imgod2u: zedster: FTA:The good news is that Gen Y members are perceived as tech savvy, and smart about ways to leverage social media

Social Media != tech savvy

The number of people my age I know who are inept when it comes to computers and tech is amazing. Oh! I might have to reboot my desktop after I've left a java filled website running for a week? What's that scarey looking black and white text screen?

The ability to upload a video to Facebook is nothing on the tech scale. Most people don't know the first thing about how their microwaves work let alone their computer. It like arguing that a good driver makes a good mechanic. I wonder how many can even create an Excel sheet with formulas?

I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?

//the term leverage needs to be binned from it's current usage
///going to leverage the cloud to increase synergy as a value proposition to achieve six sigma

Tech savvy != knowing the inner workings of a computer.

To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell. The vast majority of use cases for today's use of tech is being able to communicate through various social platforms at once, targeting and adjusting your feed and updates to the liking of your audience.

While the analogy of driver vs mechanic is valid, what most tasks requires today (and in the past as well) are good drivers, not good mechanics.


What tasks? Not any that pay. (Well there may be one social media seat at each company)
Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.
 
2013-09-03 04:40:09 PM
As a gen Y manager, I'm geting a kick not giving a shiat about this.

/My employees like me.
//Not cut throat or entitled.
///I do Fark a bit too much at work though.
 
2013-09-03 04:40:39 PM

Gergesa: INeedAName: As someone who just got hired on as a program director, for a substantial pay increase, I laugh at your inability to synergize, an upscale, out of the box paradigm, with company cross pollination.

/Actually it's summer camp and retreat center which basically means I'm going to get paid to run around in the woods, play with boats, and hit kids in the face with dodgeballs!
//Life is good.

[fc09.deviantart.net image 850x850]


I am debating a chainsaw. I will have to keep gas receipts, but the sounds is just so much more satisfying!
 
2013-09-03 04:40:41 PM
It's a good thing I'm gen x
Wait wait how does this factor into using fark while on the clock?

/all the milfs and interns are gone what the hell else am I suppose to do? work?
 
2013-09-03 04:41:53 PM
All you need to know:

i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-03 04:42:03 PM

FlashHarry: Grand_Moff_Joseph: noone is going to help you when the chips are set to fall.

[i43.tinypic.com image 314x354]

"Sorry, mate - you're on your own!"


Damn!  I was thinking that not only would I get some help with me chips, but it would've come from one of Herman's Hermits!

I was planning to use this pic . . .

userserve-ak.last.fm

. . .  but yours works better.
 
2013-09-03 04:42:09 PM
Ah, yes...  The age old story of how much more us old guys know.  It is, however true.

Back in the days of my old IBM PC that I had to boot up off a floppy, and no means of really navigating the OS unless you understood DOS commands.  In fact it was almost a necessity to understand BASIC at the very least, if you really wanted to do anything interesting.  It was possible to build a Frankenstein machine out of old parts.  Remember actually having to change jumpers on every piece of hardware so there were no conflicts?  Ah, those were the days.

If I were to try to get either one of my kids to make any sort of sense of that now, the first question would be, "where's the mouse?"

Computers are so ubiquitous nowadays that the old school ways are totally unneeded.  They more or less work like a TV now.  You turn it on.  It works.

I can't exactly say that this is good or bad.  But I would venture to say that there is some value in knowing the old-school, low-level version of things.  It really helps you get a grasp of what's going on in the background.  Assuming you really give a crap, which is perhaps another matter.
 
2013-09-03 04:44:23 PM

Space Station Wagon: What tasks? Not any that pay. (Well there may be one social media seat at each company)
Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.


I think you grossly overestimate the number of positions that require spreadsheets or anything of the sort. Discounting manual labor and service jobs (the majority), even office work often involve no more than email, write-ups, dictation, copy/mail and keeping/organizing a schedule.
 
2013-09-03 04:46:58 PM

Space Station Wagon: Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.


=concatenate(A1," ",B1)


/saves so much time
 
2013-09-03 04:47:52 PM

Cargo: I was planning to use this pic . . .


cor blimey! 'e looks 14 there, 'e does!
 
2013-09-03 04:50:32 PM

DamnYankees: LasersHurt: Being good at a job no longer entitles you to good wages and a strong career. You have to be able and willing to aggressively pursue career changes and promotions if you want to make real money.

It sucks, but it's the way things are in a lot of places.

It's the result of our move from a wage-based economy to an asset-based economy. Happened under Reagan and has never stopped, and its caused serious, serious issues.


Is it trickling down yet?


durbnpoisn: Computers are so ubiquitous nowadays that the old school ways are totally unneeded.  They more or less work like a TV now.  You turn it on.  It works.

I can't exactly say that this is good or bad.  But I would venture to say that there is some value in knowing the old-school, low-level version of things.  It really helps you get a grasp of what's going on in the background.  Assuming you really give a crap, which is perhaps another matter.


www.resourcesforlife.com
 
2013-09-03 04:56:31 PM

zedster: Rincewind53: As a member of this generation, I agree entirely with your statement that young people don't know jack shiat about tech. It's appalling how many of my cohort would find themselves completely stymied by a very basic tech problem.

I blame Apple.


As much as I hate Apple I think it boils down to that we stopped teaching basics. It seems like most Baby Boomers who have a four year degree had to learn fortran punch cards at some point and later word perfect macros. We assume our generation will learn tech through osmosis and failed to teach important skills in the information age like oh, critical thinking. So you have the tree octopus problem


How the hell do people in Star Trek learn so much?!?!?
 
2013-09-03 04:57:19 PM

Shostie: "YOU, ALRIGHT! I LEARNED IT BY WATCHING YOU!"


This.  You can't raise a bunch of kids by telling them that "the biggest cocksucker wins" and expect them to learn ethics or dignity.
 
2013-09-03 04:57:55 PM

zedster: Space Station Wagon: Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.

=concatenate(A1," ",B1)


/saves so much time


2.bp.blogspot.com

Can tell you a thing or two about concatenation.
 
2013-09-03 04:59:14 PM

give me doughnuts: What the hell is a "culturally competent team"?

Is it because you included the Indian guy, and are making him do all the work?


It means you can get them to kiss your ass by playing their on their fears of seeming insensitive and then paying them off each other.
 
2013-09-03 05:01:12 PM
People trust the cute people.  Gen Ys are the youngest people of working age, therefore the cutest, therefore the most trustworthy.


Yes, I know that that isn't reasonable, but we're talking about TV, movie and ad-addled Americans here.
 
2013-09-03 05:01:27 PM
At my previous firm, we brought in young staff auditors straight out of college. Never have I met a more entitled group of people. Not only did they require constant supervision and hourly feedback, most of them lacked any real drive -- they acted as if everything would be handed to them in due time. Most assumed they would be promoted after "putting in a whole year".

I get tired of reading articles suggesting Gen-X managers/leaders adapt to the Gen-Y'ers. Newsflash... it's a two-way street. It's time Gen-Y realises the corporate world is dog-eat-dog.

Don't get me wrong, there were some strong performers in the bunch, but they were outnumbered by the lazy-asses.
 
2013-09-03 05:04:53 PM
And these "gen y" people are why I make good money on my own time, since they're too lazy to RTFM. I have nothing to complain about.

/tech savvy
//why yes you can pay me to plug that in for you.
 
2013-09-03 05:06:03 PM

jankyboy: At my previous firm, we brought in young staff auditors straight out of college. Never have I met a more entitled group of people. Not only did they require constant supervision and hourly feedback, most of them lacked any real drive -- they acted as if everything would be handed to them in due time. Most assumed they would be promoted after "putting in a whole year".

I get tired of reading articles suggesting Gen-X managers/leaders adapt to the Gen-Y'ers. Newsflash... it's a two-way street. It's time Gen-Y realises the corporate world is dog-eat-dog.

Don't get me wrong, there were some strong performers in the bunch, but they were outnumbered by the lazy-asses.


I predict this has been said by every generation about the generation that enters the workforce after it since the entire history of western civilisation.

"Don't mind him - he's generation Sumeria - probably thinks lifting two pyramid blocks a day is what cuts it around here - back in my day the Pharoah would have had him whipped".
 
2013-09-03 05:08:48 PM

RottNDude: And these "gen y" people are why I make good money on my own time, since they're too lazy to RTFM. I have nothing to complain about.

/tech savvy
//why yes you can pay me to plug that in for you.


I figure half of the money I've made in IT came from reading the error message on the screen and looking up the answer.

/No. lady, the first thing I think of is NOT to check and see if you plugged the power supply from your massaging chair into the router.
 
2013-09-03 05:09:23 PM

Tigger: jankyboy: At my previous firm, we brought in young staff auditors straight out of college. Never have I met a more entitled group of people. Not only did they require constant supervision and hourly feedback, most of them lacked any real drive -- they acted as if everything would be handed to them in due time. Most assumed they would be promoted after "putting in a whole year".

I get tired of reading articles suggesting Gen-X managers/leaders adapt to the Gen-Y'ers. Newsflash... it's a two-way street. It's time Gen-Y realises the corporate world is dog-eat-dog.

Don't get me wrong, there were some strong performers in the bunch, but they were outnumbered by the lazy-asses.

I predict this has been said by every generation about the generation that enters the workforce after it since the entire history of western civilisation.

"Don't mind him - he's generation Sumeria - probably thinks lifting two pyramid blocks a day is what cuts it around here - back in my day the Pharoah would have had him whipped".


Hell, I had to carry those damn blocks to school uphill both ways.
 
2013-09-03 05:12:50 PM
www.lamebook.com
 
2013-09-03 05:13:30 PM
I wish they would stop generalizing generations like this.  I was born in 1983.  I have more in common with someone born in 1970 than I do with someone born in 1995.

Technology has moved so fast in the past 10-15 years, and our culture has changed as rapidly.
 
2013-09-03 05:13:36 PM
Just applied for a job in a larger city with a substantial pay increase doing the same thing I've been doing the past 4 years.  I'm beyond qualified for the meat and potatoes requirements of the job, only thing is I know I won't get it because I don't have any professional work experience with HTML code.

I can imagine some dickhead Gen Y kid being the project manager.

I'm guessing posting pictures to fark doesn't count as the kind of experience they're looking for, but it was worth the effort and took up room on the resume. Fingers are crossed the HR person is a fellow farker.
 
2013-09-03 05:14:13 PM

Dubya's_Coke_Dealer: RottNDude: And these "gen y" people are why I make good money on my own time, since they're too lazy to RTFM. I have nothing to complain about.

/tech savvy
//why yes you can pay me to plug that in for you.

I figure half of the money I've made in IT came from reading the error message on the screen and looking up the answer.

/No. lady, the first thing I think of is NOT to check and see if you plugged the power supply from your massaging chair into the router.


Also, having a terminal window open and editing a prefs file or kext, or registry editor, or any of the command line tools usually elicits "YOU UNDERSTAND ALL THAT?!!"

I love my job.
No manager.
 
2013-09-03 05:16:22 PM

zedster: I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?


If done right, quite a bit. The ROI in social is significantly higher than the ROI in almost all traditional advertising, and higher than a large portion of other digital efforts.

Of course, it's impossible to convince boomers of this, even if you show them all sorts of pretty charts that clearly demonstrate value. Largely, this is because boomers assume that if it wasn't around when they were young, it's not really real and can safely be ignored. They're also terrified of things they can't understand, and think that they're smarter than everyone around them (up to and including very successful companies, many in the Fortune 500, that spend tons of money on social because they know there's a definite return there).

But I'm not bitter or anything.

More to the point of the article, is it possible that Gen Y managers are "seen" as entitled primarily by older workers who are bitter at their younger colleagues being put into positions of authority over them? Notice nowhere in the article, or the survey that it was based on, did they actually talk about any specific ways that Gen Y managers acted entitled. In fact, they didn't even actually bother to look at actual managerial actions or mindsets that would indicate that there was any entitlement going on. In FACT in fact, they specifically mentioned that Gen Y employees and managers were adaptable, ambitious, driven, and smart. So, with that, did nobody bother to say "Hmmm....these talented, ambitious, smart managers are jumping over the heads of older workers who can't keep up. How much of this "perceived" "entitlement" is actually bitterness and jealousy?"

I'm 29 and I've been put into managerial and leadership positions above people twice my age. From my experience (which is not statistically significant, mind you, but worth mentioning), the boomers twice my age were the most recalcitrant, difficult, conniving, and petty employees I have ever worked with. We ended up firing a client that my company was managing the marketing for because her in-house staff resented us being in charge and refused to do the work assigned to them. The client ended up crashing and burning very shortly afterwards, so there was some good news.

People have been whining about how entitled Gen Y is and how much we like to think we're better than older workers, and what a bunch of asses we all are. Unfortunately, if you look at the actual data, Gen Y workers are better educated, more efficient, have a better grasp of leveraging technology to increase productivity, and are advancing through the ranks of corporate america faster than any generation before us - all despite putting more emphasis on work/life balance and reporting higher life satisfaction than other generations. So if you think we're acting like we're better than you, it's because objectively, we are. Sorry, I know that hurts, and I know it sucks getting passed up for a promotion a decade before retiring (we know it was your last shot at that corner office. Maybe if you worked harder, you would have made it!), but that's the way it is.
 
2013-09-03 05:18:46 PM

IdBeCrazyIf: skozlaw: So, basically, the 80s is back minus the goofy hair and shiatty music.

Wait.... Miley Cyrus....

So, basically, the 80s is back.

Wake me when the 90's are back when it was acceptable to dress like a hobo


was? am i doing it wrong still? just kill me before we get to the criss kross stage... fact is, people are people, they have generally been out for themself and will continue to do so because human nature is as such. i've never been good at the "cover your ass " stuff because im not the one usually screwing up, but when someone needs a body for that bus it sure helps. sad it has to be this way.
 
2013-09-03 05:20:18 PM

RottNDude: Also, having a terminal window open and editing a prefs file or kext, or registry editor, or any of the command line tools usually elicits "YOU UNDERSTAND ALL THAT?!!"


In my experience (and yes, I also "understand all that"), it's cheaper to just buy a new computer than to deal with trying to fix anything more serious than a stuck website. Especially since everything is backed up to a remote server instantaneously anyway.
 
2013-09-03 05:23:02 PM
What to do when a younger boss throws you under the bus and you lose your job: Apply for unemployment and get turned down. Appeal and call that boss as a witness. Ask them difficult questions you can prove in writing, and when they perjure themselves, sue the company using the transcript of the hearing as evidence.

It worked for me. I got a payout, and the brown-nosing satan-skank of a boss got fired. None of this would have happened if I'd been treated fairly.

/Sleeps just fine at night
 
2013-09-03 05:23:11 PM

imgod2u: Tech savvy != knowing the inner workings of a computer.

To navigate the world today, the vast majority of cases involving technology does not require knowing how to create formulas in Excel nor being able to unmount network drives in Powershell.


Hold on, so basic Excel skills and simple command line operations are considered "knowing the inner workings of a computer" nowadays?

Yikes.
 
2013-09-03 05:26:48 PM
Citing a study and not linking to that study is piss-poor journalism. Was it some sort of survey? Who were the respondents? What was the respondents' demographic?  How big a group was surveyed? What questions were asked? Was it limited to the USA or did it cover other countries?
Sweeping generalizations and anecdotal evidence don't constitute valid support for conclusions.
Kelley Holland, your blog sucks.
 
2013-09-03 05:27:52 PM

imgod2u: Space Station Wagon: What tasks? Not any that pay. (Well there may be one social media seat at each company)
Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.

I think you grossly overestimate the number of positions that require spreadsheets or anything of the sort. Discounting manual labor and service jobs (the majority), even office work often involve no more than email, write-ups, dictation, copy/mail and keeping/organizing a schedule.


Actually, teaching a manager excelle here has made their jobs easier and require less paperwork from us. Excelle is an underrated management tool that needs to be used more often for tracking metrics and the like in meaningful ways. It is not so much needed for office jobs, but middle management anywhere can find uses for excelle.
 
2013-09-03 05:29:44 PM

Klippoklondike: I wish they would stop generalizing generations like this.  I was born in 1983.  I have more in common with someone born in 1970 than I do with someone born in 1995.

Technology has moved so fast in the past 10-15 years, and our culture has changed as rapidly.


The whole generational nonsense is stupid and haphazard anyway and only serves to fill space and satisfy various bias held by people who can't enjoy life.
 
2013-09-03 05:30:34 PM
Lusiphur:

The short answer to your question is that this study is meaningless if it isn't longitudinal. EVERYONE thinks the generation beneath them are lazy shiftless ne'erdowells.
 
2013-09-03 05:31:53 PM

r1niceboy: What to do when a younger boss throws you under the bus and you lose your job: Apply for unemployment and get turned down. Appeal and call that boss as a witness. Ask them difficult questions you can prove in writing, and when they perjure themselves, sue the company using the transcript of the hearing as evidence.

It worked for me. I got a payout, and the brown-nosing satan-skank of a boss got fired. None of this would have happened if I'd been treated fairly.

/Sleeps just fine at night


Yeah, that's one approach.  I still remember when you just showed up, did what you did, made it work and cashed  your check  without all the K Mart power struggles.  There's something to be said for the dignity of that, IMHO.  I believe that as soon as your workplace turns into some soap opera pissing match of passive aggressive shenanigans, your workplace is full of people who have very little to offer the company other than keeping the serfs in line.
 
2013-09-03 05:32:32 PM

Lusiphur: zedster: I would like to see that revenue vs expenditures of social media vs print and TV ad campaigns. So your company created a meme, how many more bottle of Dos XX got sold?

If done right, quite a bit. The ROI in social is significantly higher than the ROI in almost all traditional advertising, and higher than a large portion of other digital efforts.

Of course, it's impossible to convince boomers of this, even if you show them all sorts of pretty charts that clearly demonstrate value. Largely, this is because boomers assume that if it wasn't around when they were young, it's not really real and can safely be ignored. They're also terrified of things they can't understand, and think that they're smarter than everyone around them (up to and including very successful companies, many in the Fortune 500, that spend tons of money on social because they know there's a definite return there).

But I'm not bitter or anything.

More to the point of the article, is it possible that Gen Y managers are "seen" as entitled primarily by older workers who are bitter at their younger colleagues being put into positions of authority over them? Notice nowhere in the article, or the survey that it was based on, did they actually talk about any specific ways that Gen Y managers acted entitled. In fact, they didn't even actually bother to look at actual managerial actions or mindsets that would indicate that there was any entitlement going on. In FACT in fact, they specifically mentioned that Gen Y employees and managers were adaptable, ambitious, driven, and smart. So, with that, did nobody bother to say "Hmmm....these talented, ambitious, smart managers are jumping over the heads of older workers who can't keep up. How much of this "perceived" "entitlement" is actually bitterness and jealousy?"

I'm 29 and I've been put into managerial and leadership positions above people twice my age. From my experience (which is not statistically significant, mind you, but worth mentioning), th ...


Like, all the boomers? I hate to tell you this but everybody that runs a business gets idiot clients.  This isn't a Gen Y problem.  It's a people without brains problem.

Unlike you, I find idiots exist at all ages.  I don't find Gen Y people particularly smarter or dumber.
 
2013-09-03 05:32:41 PM

RottNDude: And these "gen y" people are why I make good money on my own time, since they're too lazy to RTFM. I have nothing to complain about.

/tech savvy
//why yes you can pay me to plug that in for you.


People neglecting to RTFM crosses generational boundaries. It also goes well beyond the literal RFTM.

I'm 27. I'm a customer service/tech support rep at a company that makes audio equipment. The amount of calls and emails I get as a result of a person just being too lazy poke around on our website or throw a quick query into Google astounds me. The amount of information that is accessible in this day and age is incredible, yet people don't bother even dipping their toes into the pool for fear they might actually learn something. This holds true for people of all ages.

There is also a decided lack of critical thinking ability among the people I deal with. There have been countless times that I have dealt with "professionals", many of whom are employed by very large companies, who don't understand that the more variables you can remove from the equation the easier it will be to find the cause of the problem. Granted, sometimes you might not be able to pare things down as far as you'd like, but to not understand why it should be attempted is inexcusable. This is beyond basic and applicable outside of tech problems.

Along with this, I constantly get people who aren't even willing to attempt to troubleshoot a problem. I have customers that would rather spend hundreds of dollars in fees and downtime with equipment than take the piece, hook it up, and work with me to do a little troubleshooting to find out if the problem is legit.

My job is to help people and I'm fine with that. I think part of the reason why I'm good at this job is that I'm very good at maintaining an even keel outwardly even if internally I'm seething with rage. I guess I just don't get why people would rather rely on other people to fix their problems rather than putting in a little effort to fix them on their own barring extenuating circumstances.
 
2013-09-03 05:33:17 PM

imgod2u: Space Station Wagon: What tasks? Not any that pay. (Well there may be one social media seat at each company)
Become an excel superhero = get a job almost anywhere.

I think you grossly overestimate the number of positions that require spreadsheets or anything of the sort. Discounting manual labor and service jobs (the majority), even office work often involve no more than email, write-ups, dictation, copy/mail and keeping/organizing a schedule.


Meanwhile, I have about 10 spreadsheets open on my PC right now. I can only imagine what the accounting team is doing with it
 
2013-09-03 05:34:16 PM
I'm self employed and my boss is a sexual harassing hard-ass.
 
2013-09-03 05:34:59 PM
Companies whose business involves physical product, payroll, purchasing, accounts payable, loans, interest, billing, or basically quantifying and measuring things, can make good use of Excel. It's one of the most powerful, most widely distributed, business tools in existence.
 
Displayed 50 of 232 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report