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(Sun News Network)   Millennial family disconnects from the Internet and all modern technology, lives as if they were in 1986, a shadowy era of cassettes, wired phones, tube TVs, paper maps, and bizarre objects called "books"   (sunnewsnetwork.ca) divider line 144
    More: Weird, internet, video cameras  
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4779 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Sep 2013 at 7:48 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



144 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-02 07:55:15 AM
The Amish laugh at your shenanigans
 
2013-09-02 07:56:24 AM
He's 26??????? What is it with people and their rush to look middle aged?
 
2013-09-02 07:57:23 AM
...turn me loose....turn me loose.....
 
2013-09-02 07:58:58 AM
And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.
 
2013-09-02 08:16:49 AM
So he's handicapping his kids' future career prospects by making them unfamiliar with technology, forcing his wife to obey his every whim in a vaguely creepy, controlling fashion and simultaneously being the kind of sanctimonious ass who always has to tell everyone that he doesn't own a TV.

Oh, and he has that exact style of mustache that only douchebags, 80's cop show protagonists and Pantera fans wear. I think I can guess which category he falls into.
 
2013-09-02 08:17:03 AM
Problem: deleting Facebook account deprives attention-whore of attention
Solution: get website to write article on how you deleted Facebook account
Irony: HTTP did not exist in 1986
 
2013-09-02 08:18:40 AM
I dunno, I think there might be a way to responsibly parent your kids without depriving yourself. It's not an all-or-nothing equation.
 
2013-09-02 08:20:21 AM
Guy's nuts. There's things we do with our kids, like restricting how often they watch TV or use the internet, or play on their DSs, but what is the possible advantage of losing GPS or replacing solid-state media with farking tapes? And both my kids read a ton now because they have Kindles - there's no waiting to go to a bookshop or a library.
 
2013-09-02 08:24:39 AM

propasaurus: I dunno, I think there might be a way to responsibly parent your kids without depriving yourself. It's not an all-or-nothing equation.


Yeah, this. If you're unable to set reasonable boundaries on "electronics", that's more of a reflection on your parenting than the insidious nature of Candy Crush
 
2013-09-02 08:25:26 AM

Gunther: So he's handicapping his kids' future career prospects by making them unfamiliar with technology, forcing his wife to obey his every whim in a vaguely creepy, controlling fashion and simultaneously being the kind of sanctimonious ass who always has to tell everyone that he doesn't own a TV.

Oh, and he has that exact style of mustache that only douchebags, 80's cop show protagonists and Pantera fans wear. I think I can guess which category he falls into.


Hey, fark off, Pantera is awesome. And I don't need a moustache to say it.
 
2013-09-02 08:27:38 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: He's 26??????? What is it with people and their rush to look middle aged?


From that stache I thought he was living like it was 1975.
 
2013-09-02 08:28:00 AM
FTA: "The family started shunning technology after Blair asked his son Trey to join him in playing outside.

Unfortunately, Trey opted to continue swiping his tiny fingers on daddy's iPad."


Much more logical than just taking the farking thing away and pushing the kid out the door. I didn't think parenting was that hard that it's easier to completely shun things instead.
 
2013-09-02 08:36:22 AM
He can still get a 300 baud modem and hook it up to his IBM-PC or Unisys and dial up a Prodigy or GEnie BBS and spank it to some ASCII porn.

Either that, or go rent some videotapes.
 
2013-09-02 08:47:23 AM
No cable? They had cable in 86. I spent a few months in the US in 1980, and the apartment we rented had cable.  And I got my first email account in 83 when I went to college.
 
2013-09-02 08:48:09 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.


And while cassettes were popular, records were still around, and by '86, everything was on CD's.  Cell phones were in their second generation (think brick v. briefcase) and cable was old news.  In fact, Rogers (one of the big three communication companies in Canada) changed it's name in 1986 from Rogers Cablesystems (it's name since 1967) to Rogers Communications.  Apple II's were all the rage, and the first 16 bit NES was out that year too.
Lastly, Blair, GET A JOB.  While not totally unheard of, the stay-at-home dad thing was pretty rare.
 
2013-09-02 08:50:57 AM
That's going to make Bitcoin mining pretty hard. Isn't it?
 
2013-09-02 08:55:04 AM
Is that a mullet?
 
2013-09-02 08:58:46 AM
He sounds like the guy you knew from high school who always has some new way he's going to "make it big" every time you see him. If he was 15 years older I'd bet any amount of money he'd tried raising llamas at some point in his life. His resume probably looks like a brainstorming session from NBC Sitcom Development.
 
2013-09-02 08:59:21 AM
Personally, I applaud people that stop letting tech take over their lives and go to live in ways that don't rely on it.
 
2013-09-02 09:02:33 AM
On a typical day in 1986, I could have played some videogames, watched some cable tv, and maybe messed around on the computer for a bit. The lesson: people who were born in year X are not always experts on life in year X.
 
2013-09-02 09:03:44 AM

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.

And while cassettes were popular, records were still around, and by '86, everything was on CD's.  Cell phones were in their second generation (think brick v. briefcase) and cable was old news.  In fact, Rogers (one of the big three communication companies in Canada) changed it's name in 1986 from Rogers Cablesystems (it's name since 1967) to Rogers Communications.  Apple II's were all the rage, and the first 16 bit NES was out that year too.
Lastly, Blair,

GET A JOB.  While not totally unheard of, the stay-at-home dad thing was pretty rare.can be soul-crushing.

No wonder the guy is coming up with goofy endeavors like this - he needs some self-worth. Plus he's a idiot. No cable in 1983? Maybe he lived in bum-fark egypt
 
2013-09-02 09:05:02 AM

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.

And while cassettes were popular, records were still around, and by '86, everything was on CD's.  Cell phones were in their second generation (think brick v. briefcase) and cable was old news.  In fact, Rogers (one of the big three communication companies in Canada) changed it's name in 1986 from Rogers Cablesystems (it's name since 1967) to Rogers Communications.  Apple II's were all the rage, and the first 16 bit NES was out that year too.
Lastly, Blair, GET A JOB.  While not totally unheard of, the stay-at-home dad thing was pretty rare.


16 bit NES?

Really?
 
2013-09-02 09:06:37 AM

Trainspotr: On a typical day in 1986, I could have played some videogames, watched some cable tv, and maybe messed around on the computer for a bit. The lesson: people who were born in year X are not always experts on life in year X.


Yeah, I was as likely to have spent a summer day inside farking around on my C64 or playing my Atari 2600 as I am to spend a summer day inside farking around on my Mac and playing with my Xbox.  The idealized pre-tech golden age this douche (who was actually born in 1987 if he's 26, and wow he is a rough 26) thinks existed didn't.  At least not at that point.
 
2013-09-02 09:07:46 AM
On the other hand, the number of unmarried, unemployed 20-something dudes with two kids and a live in girlfriend had to be pretty close to zero percent of the population in 1986.
 
2013-09-02 09:10:16 AM
I don't know exactly how old the Fark population is, but quite a few of us had been alive for a while already in 1986. We lived part of our lives like this. Most of us are still here, and (gasp!) even know how to use a lot of new technology. Some people use more of it, some less. We don't care about your experiment.
 
2013-09-02 09:13:15 AM
Gunther:
Oh, and he has that exact style of mustache that only douchebags, 80's cop show protagonists and Pantera fans wear. I think I can guess which category he falls into.

You said douchebags twice.
 
2013-09-02 09:13:46 AM
Maybe in 80 years they will have 1980s renactors. The guy is younger than me and looks older than me all he needs is a van with a waterbed in the back or an el camino with astroturf in the bed.
 
2013-09-02 09:14:02 AM

sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.

And while cassettes were popular, records were still around, and by '86, everything was on CD's.  Cell phones were in their second generation (think brick v. briefcase) and cable was old news.  In fact, Rogers (one of the big three communication companies in Canada) changed it's name in 1986 from Rogers Cablesystems (it's name since 1967) to Rogers Communications.  Apple II's were all the rage, and the first 16 bit NES was out that year too.
Lastly, Blair, GET A JOB.  While not totally unheard of, the stay-at-home dad thing was pretty rare.


Not everybody was using CD's in '86.  Heck, I was 8 years old in 86, I remember it rather well.  Our family didn't get a CD player of any kind until '93.  Around '86 I was still playing 45rpm records on a turntable and my mother was still listening to 8-tracks.   We got cable around '88.

The NES was 8-bit,not 16 bit, and while it was out in Japan and had a very limited release in the US by that point, it wasn't widely released or promoted until Christmas season of '87.  That's the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was, yeah, the NES was in a few stores in October of '85. . .but it wasn't widely distributed or marketed until fall of '87.  In '86 I was still playing my old Atari 5200.

Cell phones might have existed, but they were definitely not everyday items.  They were usually called "carphones" and kept only in cars because they were too large and bulky to just walk around with.  Very limited coverage areas also meant that if you weren't in a big city, they were useless.  Cellular phones for everyday use started to become just a tad more common by the mid '90's before becoming ubiquitous in the early 2000's.  It's not a stretch to say "no cell phones" when trying to live like people in '86.

PC's were another thing that were not for everyday use either.  Seriously, the first IBM PC was indeed in 1982, and the IBM AT was indeed the current model of computer at the time with it's 80286 processor running at 6 MHz and 20 MB hard drive running DOS 3.0. . . but they were very expensive and not in most houses.  Heck, we didn't even have a PC in our school until 1990.  My Dad took me to his job once around the mid 80's to show me that they had got a computer in there now.  If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.
 
2013-09-02 09:21:07 AM

Silverstaff: If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.


Speaking of " the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was ", you ever hear of Commodore, Atari, Apple? Everyone had a home computer in 1986.
 
2013-09-02 09:29:42 AM
Cheese eating surrender monkey:
16 bit NES?

Really?


Silverstaff:

The NES was 8-bit,not 16 bit, and while it was out in Japan and had a very limited release in the US by that point, it wasn't widely released or promoted until Christmas season of '87.  That's the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was, yeah, the NES was in a few stores in October of '85. . .but it wasn't widely distributed or marketed until fall of '87.  In '86 I was still playing my old Atari 5200.


You are both right, I actually still have one in the basement somewhere too.... my bad.

As for the rest, I'll stand by that.  I was in high school when I bought my first cd player a Yamaha CD-X1 in 1984.
 
2013-09-02 09:31:08 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Silverstaff: If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.

Speaking of " the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was ", you ever hear of Commodore, Atari, Apple? Everyone had a home computer in 1986.


You forgot Tandy. Radio Shack sold a ton of computers in the 80s.
 
2013-09-02 09:38:56 AM
let me see, I was born in 1982. in existence were...

cell phones, the internet, video games, personal micro computers, CDs, LaserDiscs, and other shiat. Human technology really hasn't taken a massive leap forward since the integrated circuit, since then it's all basically been refinement.

This guy is an asshat.
 
2013-09-02 09:42:59 AM

KellyMG: Gunther:
Oh, and he has that exact style of mustache that only douchebags, 80's cop show protagonists and Pantera fans wear. I think I can guess which category he falls into.

You said douchebags twice.


He likes douchebags
 
2013-09-02 09:46:44 AM
OMG!!!!

USING MAPS INSTEAD OF GPS!!!!!

Just like almost every motorcycle rider.
 
2013-09-02 09:48:08 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Silverstaff: If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.

Speaking of " the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was ", you ever hear of Commodore, Atari, Apple? Everyone had a home computer in 1986.


Don't forget the Amiga
 
2013-09-02 09:50:46 AM
Sh*t, the movie WarGames came out in 1985 and Matthew Broderick was using the Internet then.
 
2013-09-02 09:52:54 AM

stratagos: Quantum Apostrophe: Silverstaff: If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.

Speaking of " the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was ", you ever hear of Commodore, Atari, Apple? Everyone had a home computer in 1986.

Don't forget the Amiga


That was Commodore. Yes, I know all about Hi-Toro and all that, but by the time I got my Amiga it had Commodore stamped on it.
 
2013-09-02 09:53:29 AM

Gunther: Oh, and he has that exact style of mustache that only douchebags, 80's cop show protagonists and Pantera fans wear. I think I can guess which category he falls into.



Hate on their music and fans all you want but Pantera makes some fine artisan breads.
 
2013-09-02 09:54:49 AM
I didn't have cable tv, a computer, or CDs in 1986.

You rich yuppie kids disgust me.
 
2013-09-02 10:00:20 AM

sendtodave: I didn't have cable tv, a computer, or CDs in 1986.

You rich yuppie kids disgust me.


Wasn't rich I just lived in a 200sq/ft apartment so I could spend money on computers, my BBS and a little later connection to the "internet".
 
2013-09-02 10:11:53 AM
"I remember the day before we started this, I was a wreck and I was like 'I can't believe I have to delete my Facebook!'" she said.

Uhh... That's because you don't have to delete it.  It would have been waiting for you all by its lonesome just fine if you just left it alone until april 2014.  Now you have to go rebuild it next year, congratulations...
 
2013-09-02 10:17:06 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: stratagos: Quantum Apostrophe: Silverstaff: If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.

Speaking of " the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was ", you ever hear of Commodore, Atari, Apple? Everyone had a home computer in 1986.

Don't forget the Amiga

That was Commodore. Yes, I know all about Hi-Toro and all that, but by the time I got my Amiga it had Commodore stamped on it.


Both the Amiga and Atari ST were out by 1986. They were still new, expensive and not yet well-supported so as a result far more people were using the Spectrum, C64 and Amstrad CPC, but they were there.
 
2013-09-02 10:40:54 AM
Another person who lived in the 80s.

drkellyflanagan.com

He took his family on a trip.

mimg.ugo.com

But it didn't turn out quite the way he thought it would.

www.clarkgriswoldcollection.com

/See, even Clark Griswold used a computer back then to plan his trips!
//just be careful that your son isn't trying to eat your car with the video game sprite he was playing with
 
2013-09-02 10:44:04 AM
That's heavy.
 
2013-09-02 10:46:01 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.


Tell us about the 3D printers.
 
2013-09-02 10:53:19 AM
No Atari? No Nintendo? I'd mutiny!
 
2013-09-02 11:05:56 AM
I don't use a cell phone, except on road trips--if someone needs to get hold of me, they can call my home or office.

On road trips I don't rely as much on my gazetteers as I used to, but I still use them.

Is it too hard to have an "option" when buying a car/truck for manual rollup windows??  More electronics in a car is just more hard stuff I get to fix when it breaks later.
 
2013-09-02 11:09:09 AM

golden goat: I don't use a cell phone, except on road trips--if someone needs to get hold of me, they can call my home or office.

On road trips I don't rely as much on my gazetteers as I used to, but I still use them.

Is it too hard to have an "option" when buying a car/truck for manual rollup windows??  More electronics in a car is just more hard stuff I get to fix when it breaks later.


meh... the power windows still work on my 15 year old truck... so as long as the industry can keep pumping out power windows that work for 15-20+ years, then I say go for it.
 
2013-09-02 11:09:59 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: He's 26??????? What is it with people and their rush to look middle aged?


You're more employable if you look closer to Boomers than Millenials. Being young means you have no skills, even if you do.
 
2013-09-02 11:15:01 AM

baka-san: OMG!!!!

USING MAPS INSTEAD OF GPS!!!!!

Just like almost every motorcycle rider.


Everyone should have a road atlas somewhere in their car.  Keep it in the trunk, just have some idea how to use it.
 
2013-09-02 11:17:31 AM

PanicMan: baka-san: OMG!!!!

USING MAPS INSTEAD OF GPS!!!!!

Just like almost every motorcycle rider.

Everyone should have a road atlas somewhere in their car.  Keep it in the trunk, just have some idea how to use it.


A road atlas?  Is that anything like a bunch of hard to fold maps with a a lot of tears?
 
2013-09-02 11:18:58 AM
Both the BBC and Channel 4 have done similar things over here.  CH4 did both the 1900's and 1940's House shows where a modern family lives as though it were 19x0.   They were alright but both of those time periods were a lot more community focused as you'd have streets full of housewives (and other family members) pulling together to help each other which the shows didn't reflect at all.

The 1940's House had the family digging their own Anderson shelter for example, in reality the whole street moved en mass to dig them for everyone on the street so it all but killed them doing it when in reality it'd of been much easier.   And the 1900's House seemed to be heavily fankwanked by their historian who was obsessed with following the books of the time with little regards to practical realities of the scenario.

The BBC one was part of its microprocessor/home computer history bit and had a family go back to 1980 and each week/month would bring them forward a year.   Even so far as hooking up a small pager network and supplying the father with a period car to drive.

The basic gist you get from these shows is that no, it really wasn't better back then.  If your kids are spending too much time on the internet to interact with you in a meaningful way, it's your parenting that sucks.
 
2013-09-02 11:23:06 AM
Let's see ... I was born in 1977. Got cable and Atari 2600 in 1982. a fancy cordless phone in 1986.NES in 87. Central air conditioning in 88. A CD player in 1995.Computer in 1999 and a cell phone in 2008.
 
2013-09-02 11:25:17 AM
Soooo, if its 1986 for them and they aren't marrie, she's a whore. Right?
 
2013-09-02 11:25:20 AM

Silverstaff: sno man: Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.

And while cassettes were popular, records were still around, and by '86, everything was on CD's.  Cell phones were in their second generation (think brick v. briefcase) and cable was old news.  In fact, Rogers (one of the big three communication companies in Canada) changed it's name in 1986 from Rogers Cablesystems (it's name since 1967) to Rogers Communications.  Apple II's were all the rage, and the first 16 bit NES was out that year too.
Lastly, Blair, GET A JOB.  While not totally unheard of, the stay-at-home dad thing was pretty rare.

Not everybody was using CD's in '86.  Heck, I was 8 years old in 86, I remember it rather well.  Our family didn't get a CD player of any kind until '93.  Around '86 I was still playing 45rpm records on a turntable and my mother was still listening to 8-tracks.   We got cable around '88.

The NES was 8-bit,not 16 bit, and while it was out in Japan and had a very limited release in the US by that point, it wasn't widely released or promoted until Christmas season of '87.  That's the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was, yeah, the NES was in a few stores in October of '85. . .but it wasn't widely distributed or marketed until fall of '87.  In '86 I was still playing my old Atari 5200.

Cell phones might have existed, but they were definitely not everyday items.  They were usually called "carphones" and kept only in cars because they were too large and bulky to just walk around with.  Very limited coverage areas also meant that if you weren't in a big city, they were useless.  Cellular phones for everyday use started to become just a tad more common by the mid '90's before becoming ubiquitous in the early 2000's.  It's not a stretch to say "no cell phones" when trying to live like people in '86.

PC's were another thing th ...


I was going to post what you said but you wrote it better.
 
2013-09-02 11:31:21 AM

devilskware: Let's see ... I was born in 1977. Got cable and Atari 2600 in 1982. a fancy cordless phone in 1986.NES in 87. Central air conditioning in 88. A CD player in 1995.Computer in 1999 and a cell phone in 2008.


You must have looked great as a nine year old with one of these:

doublehappiness.ilikenicethings.com
 
2013-09-02 11:33:02 AM
As a Farker YOUNGER than the tard in the article, I want to kick him square in the nuts. My generation is stupid enough as it is, we don't need any more help!
 
2013-09-02 11:40:41 AM
i151.photobucket.com
Not everything in 1986 was worth living for.
 
2013-09-02 11:45:32 AM
FTFA "That's kind of when it hit me because I'm like, wow, when I was a kid, I lived outside," Blair said.

Its one of those - "I don't get todays world so therefor I'm going to torture my kid with the world of my childhood" stories.

/grow up
//learn to engage your children in new ways
///perhaps you will actually learn something
/like slashies!
 
2013-09-02 11:56:52 AM
There was alot we didn't have in'86 compared to now (I was 11-12), but if you didn't know any better then you couldn't miss it.

It really was an interesting intersection of the older systems and new technology. Index cards and microfiche at the library, four different audio formats, etc.
 
2013-09-02 11:57:54 AM
Life is hard when you're an idiot.
 
2013-09-02 11:58:49 AM
In 1986, I was playing games on a TI-99/4A or a Sinclair Spectrum 128, and listened to cassette tapes. Didn't have cable (too expensive). Mobile phones existed, but it would be a few years until pagers became common for professionals (and drug dealers). It was just before that we got a VCR, and would be a little after that we got a CD player. I read the newspaper, magazines, and books, didn't get out as much as I should have.

/the cassettes had songs recorded off the radio. The VCR was used to record TV shows
//also collected comics and sports cards.
///going out usually involved hanging around a mall.
 
2013-09-02 12:01:20 PM
But if they give up all this technology how will the government keep track of them?
 
2013-09-02 12:11:53 PM

eltejon: There was alot we didn't have in'86 compared to now (I was 11-12)


I think the important thing to consider is your relative age.  There might of been a cell phone in the house (or a computer) or even a CD player but it was unlikely to be yours; pretty much going to be your parents and they let you use it on occasion.

As a kid in 86 I 'had' the following stuff:

A TV in my bedroom
A (old) ZX Spectrum 48K + tape deck
A 'Walkman' clone.
A battery powered FM radio.

Phones were something adults had and on the understanding they've demonstrated they can use what's provided sensibly I've no issue with the modern version of that stuff appearing in a kids room today.
 
2013-09-02 12:21:27 PM

Kit Fister: Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.

Tell us about the 3D printers.


Stereolithography was invented in 1986. Don Lancaster was talking about Santa Claus Machines in the early '90s. I look around and fail to see the promised revolutions. Eric K Drexler also was gushing about nanotechnological "assemblers" in Engines of Creation (also 1986), yet anything that is called "nano" these days is about fine powders.

Hoo boy, wow what a brave new world we live in. The only massive changes since 1986 are about the amount of information we can process.

/And they don't call you Kit Fister cuz you're into chicks, if you know what I mean
 
2013-09-02 12:21:54 PM

BafflerMeal: devilskware: Let's see ... I was born in 1977. Got cable and Atari 2600 in 1982. a fancy cordless phone in 1986.NES in 87. Central air conditioning in 88. A CD player in 1995.Computer in 1999 and a cell phone in 2008.

You must have looked great as a nine year old with one of these:


Cordless =/= mobile

They were the land line phones with a base unit and a cordless handset.
 
2013-09-02 12:45:42 PM
Did anyone mention that they are happy?
 
2013-09-02 12:46:13 PM
No computers, no tablets, no smart phones, no fancy coffee machines, no Internet, no cable, and - from the point of view of many tech-dependent folks - no life.


Um, we had computers, fancy coffee machines, and cable TV in 1986, you dumbasses. Now you're just overdoing it.

lowendmac.com s3files.core77.com bbsimg.ngfiles.com
 
2013-09-02 12:49:00 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Kit Fister: Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.

Tell us about the 3D printers.

Stereolithography was invented in 1986. Don Lancaster was talking about Santa Claus Machines in the early '90s. I look around and fail to see the promised revolutions. Eric K Drexler also was gushing about nanotechnological "assemblers" in Engines of Creation (also 1986), yet anything that is called "nano" these days is about fine powders.

Hoo boy, wow what a brave new world we live in. The only massive changes since 1986 are about the amount of information we can process.

/And they don't call you Kit Fister cuz you're into chicks, if you know what I mean


Always wondered what Mr. Plinkett's Fark name was...
 
2013-09-02 12:53:08 PM
No computers, no tablets, no smart phones, no fancy coffee machines, no Internet, no cable, and - from the point of view of many tech-dependent folks - no life.

We had ONTV in Los Angeles back in 1977...it was a subscription channel that broadcast somewhat-current movies (even x-rated ones), sports, and rock concerts.

In 1986, just about everyone I knew had a Macintosh and a coffee maker.

Stay-at-home dad Blair can't listen to the latest in house music anymore and is briefly considering writing to his favourite bands for cassette tapes.

Dad apparently is unaware that CDs were available in 1986.
 
2013-09-02 01:15:43 PM

TV's Vinnie: Um, we had computers, fancy coffee machines, and cable TV in 1986, you dumbasses. Now you're just overdoing it.


Saeco made the first fully auto espresso maker in 1985.

Lorelle: Dad apparently is unaware that CDs were available in 1986.


For realz. Just a few years later it was going to be the great MiniDisc vs DAT vs Digital Compact Cassette war.
 
2013-09-02 01:23:18 PM
I'm going to live like it was the 1930's. I'll get rid of anything that isn't white, black, or shades of grey. Because, whenever I watch a movie from that time, apparently color hadn't been invented yet.
 
2013-09-02 01:28:27 PM

felix_golden: I'm going to live like it was the 1930's. I'll get rid of anything that isn't white, black, or shades of grey. Because, whenever I watch a movie from that time, apparently color hadn't been invented yet.


upload.wikimedia.org

And not a minute too soon, can you imagine fighting WWII without green?
 
2013-09-02 01:32:20 PM
My cool uncle who was single in 1986 had a Philips CD player in his single wide.  It was pretty biatchin'.
 
2013-09-02 01:35:37 PM
It seems like they were planning this ahead of time and didn't just up and do it one day.  So, why didn't he go out and hit the used books stores or what ever and buy old cassette tapes of his favorite older bands?  Also, did he go out and buy a car from 1986 or before?  If not he's cheating.  And I also assume you gave up your debit card and now carry your check book where ever you go along with a bunch of cash given that not many places take checks anymore.

Also, I know why you're a nuisance to your friends.  It's not that you leave your home without your cellphone, it's that you are probably a douchebag who can't stop telling your friends how much better you think you are than they are because you think you're living in 1986.

Oh, and that book, don't bother with it.  Before you hit Goodwill searching for a good word processor or typewriter and buying a ribbon for it, this has been done better already.  PBS had a reality tv show where three families lived like people did in the 1800s, complete with log cabins that had to be built.  No one is going to give a damn about some asshat who decides to live life in the mid-1980s and comes across as a pretentious "I'm better than you" asshole because he can go 12 months without texting.  I turned 8 in 1986 and compared to how things are today, I wouldn't want to return to that lifestyle.  Some parts were awesome, but I wouldn't want to return to that lifestyle full time as an adult.  I've used a typewriter for a high school typing class.  I would not want to have to use carbon paper when typing something up.  I wouldn't want to have a small personal address book filled with phone numbers. The Atari is fun from time to time, but modern games are so much better, Netflix beats the hell out of "Let's go to the video store." and then getting upset that the new release isn't in stock.  And internet porn is better than being that creepy guy in the special corner of the video store.
 
2013-09-02 01:35:57 PM
Heh. We're following this to some extent. I've dropped my cellphone, more out of poverty than anything else, but damn has it been nice. Because I'm self-employed, people seem to think that since I'm not really working I'm available for anything any hour of the day. Making it slightly more difficult to get a hold of means I don't have the pressure of saying yes right that minute. My fiance and I both agree that the kids don't get to watch TV until about 5, but I am planning on doing online K-12. We have already tossed cable in favor of internet; I want my kids informed, not treated as a marketing group. And we are already voracious readers, so I suspect my kids will be too.

He seems a little extreme to me, but as long as his kids aren't completely out of touch with technology and can manage, I don't have a problem. There was a wife swap where one of the families lived like it was 24/7 Ren Faire. The parents winced when the kids were screaming into the cellphone because they had never used *any* phone. That's when you've taken things too far.
 
2013-09-02 01:43:30 PM

Gunther: So he's handicapping his kids' future career prospects by making them unfamiliar with technology, forcing his wife to obey his every whim in a vaguely creepy, controlling fashion and simultaneously being the kind of sanctimonious ass who always has to tell everyone that he doesn't own a TV.


Telling anyone he's doing it, much less giving interviews about it, is douchetastic to the extreme, and his being an extreme douche actually  will hurt his kids and wife in various ways. Maybe it's just the way it got written up, but I don't like this guy any more than you do.

But no, living in a world of 1986 consumer technology will NOT actually hurt his kids--not even if they did it for their entire childhoods. (Doing it for just a year means these kids won't even remember it later on.) I'm not saying it's an inherently good thing, but it's not inherently bad, either. They're not going to end up like those actors at Colonial Williamsburg who pretend they think your camera is witchcraft. I knew what Twitter was for years before I sent my first tweet, and it was boring, so I haven't tweeted since--but I'm not being stranded on the margins of society as a result.

Besides, it takes about one day of futzing around on the internet, or playing with your new phone, etc., to get more or less back up to speed--because for everyday stuff, that speed is very, very slow. Yeah, they'll never learn Python or C++ from a book, but then most of us will never learn those things from anywhere.  I have co-workers who spend ten hours a day on the internet, but have convinced themselves that I am the only person in the world with the arcane knowledge to replace the toner cartridge on the printer. If they were in my place, this guy's kids might not immediately start Googling it before the person asking could finish their sentence, but they might actually pick up the goddamn instruction flyer that comes with every new toner cartridge and read it.
 
2013-09-02 01:46:46 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: felix_golden: I'm going to live like it was the 1930's. I'll get rid of anything that isn't white, black, or shades of grey. Because, whenever I watch a movie from that time, apparently color hadn't been invented yet.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 419x599]

And not a minute too soon, can you imagine fighting WWII without green?


Don't go correcting my misconceptions of a time of which I am not old enough to have any personal recollection.
 
2013-09-02 01:50:07 PM

TV's Vinnie: No computers, no tablets, no smart phones, no fancy coffee machines, no Internet, no cable, and - from the point of view of many tech-dependent folks - no life.


Um, we had computers, fancy coffee machines, and cable TV in 1986, you dumbasses. Now you're just overdoing it.


bbsimg.ngfiles.com

We need to bring these back. They were awesome. Twenty-five years ago I could check ten channels in the time it takes my remote, set-top box, TiVo, and TV set to negotiate the process of changing from channel 6 to 7.
 
2013-09-02 01:56:15 PM

tzzhc4: Wasn't rich I just lived in a 200sq/ft apartment so I could spend money on computers, my BBS and a little later connection to the "internet".


Was this you?:
i.imgur.com

To all those biatching about cable. In the mid-80s if you lived anywhere in Canada with less than 5,000 people/rural/remote you likely did not have cable television. I grew up with CTV, CBC, and french CBC. Shaw's cable past my town for years but they refused to offer service in the town because it "wasn't economically viable", but when the town contracted with a private satellite company in 1989 Shaw suddenly reversed their stance and started running cable to all the "bedroom communities" around Saskatoon.

We were middle class, first computer was in 1987, but Mom knew computer skills would be crucial in my lifetime. I don't remember us taking a vacation that year, so you can do the math.
 
2013-09-02 02:06:07 PM
CDs were not as ubiquious in 1986. They were still trying to figure how to display them in album stands, and they had these plastic extensions that propped the CD up in view. Some places had reusable extensions, but eventually, they just built and rebuilt displays for CDs only.

I also remember there was such an argument on the Jewel Case design. Good times.
 
2013-09-02 02:08:09 PM
For the cable part, there is a difference between the cable that we had in 1986 and what we have now.  Figure in the number of over the air channels today and what we had with cable, and I think that over the air is actually better today than cable was in 1986.  I remember back then Nickelodeon went off the air at 7.  So we'd watch "You Can't Do That on Television" and as soon as it was over, it was A&E programming.  We had HBO, that I remember, but I don't remember much else.  Cable now is over a thousand channels and you can use the guide feature to find out what you're watching, what else is on, and what's going to be on a week in advance.  So if he wants authentic 1986 cable, he's going to be better off turning the tv off and pretending that the President is giving a speech right now.
 
2013-09-02 02:15:23 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Silverstaff: If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.

Speaking of " the funny thing about just looking up the release date on Wikipedia, it completely leaves out how widespread something was ", you ever hear of Commodore, Atari, Apple? Everyone had a home computer in 1986.


Yeah, I'd heard of them, they were pretty uncommon too.

I had a Tandy TRS-80. . .and it was a piece of crap.  Spend all afternoon slowly typing a program in. . .and with only one typo it would reject the whole program with a "SYNTAX ERROR OK" and you'd have to start all over again.  My parents bought me a computer thinking it would instantly and automatically improve my grades and "prepare me for the future", but it just bored me to tears as I wasted afternoons slowly typing programs into it out of the manual that came with it. . .and on rare occasion they might just work, but it was boring as heck and I gave up on it after a few months.

Heck, only one friend of mine even had an answering machine at his house. . .and most people didn't leave messages because they were kinda scared/confused at it.  If you wanted to talk to somebody, you'd call their house and hope they were there.

I had one friend in my class at school whose family had a computer, one.  He had a Commodore 64. . .and his dad was the local lawyer so they had money.  None of my other friends had any "computers" of any kind until PC's started becoming big in the early-to-mid 90's.

So, I stand by my statement.

People seem to have this idea that everybody was an early adopter, that everybody had cell phones the moment they were available, that everybody had computers because computers existed in some form, that everyone had cable way-back-when.  The truth is, that cell phones were high-end luxury items until only a little over a decade ago, lots of people were slow to switch to CD's after having been burned on 8-tracks (and cassette tapes), personal computers only became commonplace in the household about 20 years ago, and cable TV had a much slower rollout beyond urban areas than you might think.

Goddamn it, I'm 35, I shouldn't be having belt-onion moments.
 
2013-09-02 02:19:25 PM

barefoot in the head: Did anyone mention that they are happy?


Well, they're hardly going to go to all this effort then give an interview to a media outlet and say "It farking sucks!", are they?

People who make decisions with large financial or opportunity costs tend to suffer from "post-purchase rationalization" afterwards - they'll put a lot of effort into convincing both themselves and others that they made the right decision.
 
2013-09-02 02:19:27 PM
I can kind of understand most of this, but if you're going to keep the TV, get a god damn flat screen.   Tubes are a massive (literally and figuratively) pain in the ass.   You can hang a flat screen on a wall and use the saved space to grow pot or whatever pusdo hippy shiat you imagined we did back then.
 
2013-09-02 02:33:54 PM

Silverstaff: PC's were another thing that were not for everyday use either.  Seriously, the first IBM PC was indeed in 1982, and the IBM AT was indeed the current model of computer at the time with it's 80286 processor running at 6 MHz and 20 MB hard drive running DOS 3.0. . . but they were very expensive and not in most houses.  Heck, we didn't even have a PC in our school until 1990.  My Dad took me to his job once around the mid 80's to show me that they had got a computer in there now.  If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.


A commodore 64 was $600.  We had one when I was a kid and we were not wealthy at all.
 
2013-09-02 02:49:07 PM

stratagos: Don't forget the Amiga


Yup. The '85 Amiga had a 32-bit processor (in terms of the instruction set), 4096-color graphics, stereo sound, and an operating system supporting preemptive multi-tasking, plug-and-play hardware, long filenames, etc. Microsoft didn't catch up until Windows 95.
 
2013-09-02 02:54:15 PM
That's a rough 26. Is this some kind of reaction to methadone treatment? I'm 31 and look younger than this guy.
 
2013-09-02 02:58:45 PM

Silverstaff: PC's were another thing that were not for everyday use either.  Seriously, the first IBM PC was indeed in 1982, and the IBM AT was indeed the current model of computer at the time with it's 80286 processor running at 6 MHz and 20 MB hard drive running DOS 3.0. . . but they were very expensive and not in most houses.  Heck, we didn't even have a PC in our school until 1990.  My Dad took me to his job once around the mid 80's to show me that they had got a computer in there now.  If you had one at home, you had a LOT of disposable income.


oldcomputers.net
...would like a word with you.
 
2013-09-02 03:17:33 PM
I don't understand you all who think just because you had a computer back in the 80's or that many brands were being sold, that computing was common. It wasn't like it's trying to made out to be. Even before Windows 95, computers were still an expensive thing. I had a friend tell me that back in the Eighties, a 100MB hard drive upgrade costs $1,000. How could something so expensive be common back then?

Either a lot of you had some nice disposable cash back then or I totally missed things back then. And that's even with Time Magazine calling the PC the Machine of the Year in 1983.
 
2013-09-02 03:26:13 PM

OtherLittleGuy: CDs were not as ubiquious in 1986. They were still trying to figure how to display them in album stands, and they had these plastic extensions that propped the CD up in view. Some places had reusable extensions, but eventually, they just built and rebuilt displays for CDs only.


I worked in a record shop in 85. We had a CD shelf behind the tills. It was around 88-89 that CDs really started taking off.
 
2013-09-02 03:26:46 PM

skinink: I had a friend tell me that back in the Eighties, a 100MB hard drive upgrade costs $1,000. How could something so expensive be common back then?


Many personal computers in the 80s had no or much smaller hard drive.  My C64 had no hard drive, and the first hard drive we got on our 286 was like 20 megs.

Lots of people had PCs in the 80s, and not just the rich ones.
 
2013-09-02 03:33:50 PM

skinink: I don't understand you all who think just because you had a computer back in the 80's or that many brands were being sold, that computing was common. It wasn't like it's trying to made out to be. Even before Windows 95, computers were still an expensive thing. I had a friend tell me that back in the Eighties, a 100MB hard drive upgrade costs $1,000. How could something so expensive be common back then?


Hard drives were uncommon and pricey, but almost no one had a hard drive for their home computer in the 80s.

They sold 17 million Commodore 64s, and there were also the other computers mentioned in the thread like the Ataris, the TI-99, the Apples, etc.  All with no HDD (or if there was one available, almost no one had one).  I bought both a Commodore VIC-20 and a Commodore 64 by the time I was 18, using money from a part time job.

Take it from the people who actually lived in the 80s and saw them all the time, they were not rare.  The C64 was under $600.
 
2013-09-02 03:37:34 PM
Odd. I had both an Atari 800 (with 1200 baud modem and dual floppy drives), and an Amiga 500. We had cable, and my eldest brother, being an audiophile tech-head, introduced us to the CD player. I was in college at the time. This chucklehead has not a freaking clue.
 
2013-09-02 03:38:26 PM
Oh, and cable TV as well, with the channel slider box.
 
2013-09-02 03:47:04 PM
His wife will find out that it's 2013 after all when she sneaks out to find medicine for the kid and meets a park ranger.  There were no monsters, that was just a guy in a costume.
 
2013-09-02 03:58:35 PM

Dragonflew: skinink: I don't understand you all who think just because you had a computer back in the 80's or that many brands were being sold, that computing was common. It wasn't like it's trying to made out to be. Even before Windows 95, computers were still an expensive thing. I had a friend tell me that back in the Eighties, a 100MB hard drive upgrade costs $1,000. How could something so expensive be common back then?

Hard drives were uncommon and pricey, but almost no one had a hard drive for their home computer in the 80s.

They sold 17 million Commodore 64s, and there were also the other computers mentioned in the thread like the Ataris, the TI-99, the Apples, etc.  All with no HDD (or if there was one available, almost no one had one).  I bought both a Commodore VIC-20 and a Commodore 64 by the time I was 18, using money from a part time job.

Take it from the people who actually lived in the 80s and saw them all the time, they were not rare.  The C64 was under $600.


I lived in the 80's and went to college back then. Even in the dorms it wasn't that common to see computers everywhere, and I went to an expensive school. We had computer courses and it's not like a lot of the students could go back to the dorm rooms to do the lessons on their PC.
 
2013-09-02 04:03:58 PM

syrynxx: Problem: deleting Facebook account deprives attention-whore of attention
Solution: get website to write article on how you deleted Facebook account
Irony: HTTP did not exist in 1986


Most people wouldn't understand what "finger my .plan" means.
 
2013-09-02 04:06:54 PM

Mister Peejay: syrynxx: Problem: deleting Facebook account deprives attention-whore of attention
Solution: get website to write article on how you deleted Facebook account
Irony: HTTP did not exist in 1986

Most people wouldn't understand what "finger my .plan" means.


I remember having an argument with a major school district technology "expert" (a.k.a. the band teacher with a computer in his office that everyone thought knew everything) about setting up a district website.  He was opposed to it because he was already running a gopher service.  This was in 1997.

I won the argument.   That shiat is still on my resume.
 
2013-09-02 04:07:34 PM

un4gvn666: Gunther: So he's handicapping his kids' future career prospects by making them unfamiliar with technology, forcing his wife to obey his every whim in a vaguely creepy, controlling fashion and simultaneously being the kind of sanctimonious ass who always has to tell everyone that he doesn't own a TV.

Oh, and he has that exact style of mustache that only douchebags, 80's cop show protagonists and Pantera fans wear. I think I can guess which category he falls into.

Hey, fark off, Pantera is awesome. And I don't need a moustache to say it.


Know how I know you haven't read Maddox's review of Dawn of the Dead?
 
2013-09-02 04:09:40 PM

FloydA: His wife will find out that it's 2013 after all when she sneaks out to find medicine for the kid and meets a park ranger.  There were no monsters, that was just a guy in a costume.

My word was that was a terrible movie. Thanks for reminding me of it.
 
2013-09-02 04:38:55 PM

BadReligion: FloydA: His wife will find out that it's 2013 after all when she sneaks out to find medicine for the kid and meets a park ranger.  There were no monsters, that was just a guy in a costume.
My word was that was a terrible movie. Thanks for reminding me of it.


In an unexpected twist, it turns out that M. Night Shyamalan has actually been dead for his entire career.
 
2013-09-02 04:42:37 PM
You know how sometimes, you get those parents that try to get their kids interested in the old crap they have nostalgic boners over?

This is what this sounds like, a dude with some mad nostalgic delusions over the 80's, and curses the modern day for making him try to learn things. Either that, or he's poor, and you can get pretty creative when you're broke.

//DNRTFA
 
2013-09-02 05:15:26 PM

Silverstaff: Yeah, I'd heard of them, they were pretty uncommon too.


Commodore sold 17 million Commodore 64s. How is that uncommon? Oh, you mean uncommon for you. It's possible, but I guess the gist of this thread is that 1986 wasn't this Stone Age that the douche in the article seems to think.

I still have a Commodore 64 setup that would have been possible in 1986: GEOS, 512k expansion, mouse, and several drives. The 1581 came out in 1987 though, but GEOS was able to use the 1571 in double-sided mode.

BBSes were definitely a more local phenomenon, so no instant access to all information ever.

You want some serious change? 1886.

/I was able to get a REU to 512k for free. Ask me how.
 
2013-09-02 05:30:59 PM
skinink:

I lived in the 80's and went to college back then. Even in the dorms it wasn't that common to see computers everywhere, and I went to an expensive school. We had computer courses and it's not like a lot of the students could go back to the dorm rooms to do the lessons on their PC.

Early or late 80s? It does make quite a bit of a difference. You would have seen a lot fewer computers in 1981 than in 1989. I bought my VIC-20 in 1985 and the C64 in 1988.  Even in 1980, the VIC-20 was only $299, just $100 more than the Atari 2600 that was extremely common, so prices were not out of reach. Of course, computers are more common now, but they certainly were not a rarity in the 1980s.
 
2013-09-02 05:46:50 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: And what's with the "no computers" shiat? In 1986? Really? "No cable"? 1986? This guy is a dumbfark.


Computer would habe been a Commidore 64 in 1986. Maybe vable wasn't availabe in Canada back then. I know it wasn't in Australia so the same might be true of the other colonies as well.
 
2013-09-02 05:48:08 PM

skinink: I don't understand you all who think just because you had a computer back in the 80's or that many brands were being sold, that computing was common. It wasn't like it's trying to made out to be.



Because there were and most of the people in their 30's in this very thread have said they had a computer in the house during the 80's.  CBM-64's, ZX Spectrums, Amstrad's, Atari ST's, Amiga's, Trash-80's the list goes on and they were all out in the 80's.  You could pick up a ZX Spectrum 48k for less than £200, it was seriously a hot seller when it came out in 1984.

You just think we're talking about x86 based machines.  We're not.
 
2013-09-02 05:50:31 PM

jayhawk88: He sounds like the guy you knew from high school who always has some new way he's going to "make it big" every time you see him. If he was 15 years older I'd bet any amount of money he'd tried raising llamas at some point in his life. His resume probably looks like a brainstorming session from NBC Sitcom Development.


The big difference between successful people and the likes of me is that successful people try things. And if they fail they try something else.
 
2013-09-02 06:02:00 PM
Look! they even had Windows 8 back in 1986

i.imgur.com

/watch
 
2013-09-02 06:58:54 PM
Geez people. Lots of people had 8-bit PCs in the mid 80s. Only the wealthy had an IBM-compatible PC until the late '80s.

Also- no they cannot put crank windows in cars anymore because it is cheaper to provide only one option. Specifying crank window mechanisms, designing the car to hold them and keeping the order sheets straight to ensure that they go into the card that are supposed to get them isn't financially viable.
 
2013-09-02 06:59:37 PM
trainspotr: On  the other hand, the number of unmarried, unemployed 20-something dudes with two kids and a live in girlfriend had to be pretty close to zero percent of the population in 1986.

EXACTLY. Though the 1986 media restrained itself from using the term "bastard children," societal approval of this was still pretty low, especially for public-figure-types. Not to take sides, but I find it interesting to compare its broader acceptance in (2013) society vis-a-vis gay rights/marriage issues.
 
2013-09-02 07:07:46 PM

Vaneshi: skinink: I don't understand you all who think just because you had a computer back in the 80's or that many brands were being sold, that computing was common. It wasn't like it's trying to made out to be.


Because there were and most of the people in their 30's in this very thread have said they had a computer in the house during the 80's.  CBM-64's, ZX Spectrums, Amstrad's, Atari ST's, Amiga's, Trash-80's the list goes on and they were all out in the 80's.  You could pick up a ZX Spectrum 48k for less than £200, it was seriously a hot seller when it came out in 1984.

You just think we're talking about x86 based machines.  We're not.


I think it partially depends on where you lived at that point in time and whether you were poor or middle classed back then.  My family was poor in 86 and we lived in the far northern reaches of bumfark WI. I knew of only 2-3 families in the area that had any form of home computing device back then and that was because one of the parents was a doctor usually. Of course I didn't know everyone back when I was a kid, but I can only recall 2-3 kids mentioning their computers back in the day up into my middle school years when x86 machines started to come about and more people started getting them. I do remember my aunt and uncle that were in the Air Force back in that time frame had an Apple IIe and actually brought it with them on a visit and let us play a few games on it, and one of my friends parent's got him some form of computer that we played some race car game and Oregon Trail on closer to 88-89ish.

As far as the other things some people have mentioned in the thread goes: Cable was common, CD's were around, but not terribly common. There was no "Internet" per se, but due to movies like Wargames we knew that computers were around and you could link them with a phone and something called a modem.
 
2013-09-02 07:16:36 PM

Dingleberry Dickwad: There was no "Internet" per se, but due to movies like Wargames we knew that computers were around and you could link them with a phone and something called a modem.


I think by 85ish Fidonet had outposts around the world so whilst it wouldn't necessarily be quick you could send a message to another BBS/user on a different continent via something quite like e-mail.

/Did it once in the 90's to Australia.
//Took about a week.
///Way faster than post.
 
2013-09-02 07:22:43 PM
1986, phfffffffff!
Bask in the glow of 1981 biatches!
img7.imageshack.us
 
2013-09-02 07:41:50 PM
Maps are awesome and (turn-by-turn) GPS is killing people's ability to properly use them. But what's wrong with a digital map, like Google Maps for iPhone? I use that all the time, and swear to keep turn-by-turn GPS out of my car as long as possible.
 
2013-09-02 07:42:30 PM
Also, why not use CD's at least. Cassettes are the worst. Hell, try vinyl. Plenty of house music (that the dad misses) on that.
 
2013-09-02 07:53:37 PM
If he's 26 and "living his life as he did in 1986," then I was unaware that zygotes drove cars and read maps.
 
2013-09-02 08:02:09 PM
Damn, GPS is annoying. "Drive 100 meters and turn right into this concrete wall; drive 1.4 kilometers and turn left into the parking lot of CostCo, then take another left through the tire-shredding entrance barrier. Re-calculating."

Here's what it should say: "Turn right into Trans-Canada Highway. Drive for 1,000 kilometres until you reach Quebec City." But seriously, you don't need that inane babble for 1,000 kilometers.

My parents are getting on in years and perversity. My Father's attention span is declining and his driving is beginning to scare me a bit. I don't think mechanical advice helps. Maybe someday when cars drive themselves, I would consider entrusting my life to a machine that fails me over 100 times a day.

Let's wake up and smell the coffee: I have a Sony Blu-Ray player attached to an iMac. I can't switch to the Blu Ray disc menu and there's only a one in five chance that the Blu Ray disc will work on any particular Blu Ray player any way.

The IQ that is needed to operate "simple" household devices is rising exponentially. Meanwhile, it is estmated that the average IQ of a human is 75, that the median IQ in the US is 100 (after adjusting for age, or 75 without the mathemagic) and that the likelihood that you can get help is plummeting like a tiny black hole passing through the Earth in about 3.5 seconds.

On the other hand, technology may be my salvation. They are replacing the windows on this building and I am expected to move my books, media and furniture four feet from the windows and the door. This may be physcally impossible because we are talking several tons and very little time.

If every book I owned were cheaply available in electronic form, I could possibly survive with less than 100 pounds of computer tech. Damn technology. Can't survive with it, can't survive without it.

Don't be mean to the assholes, attention whores and hipsters. Just consider them to be "volunteer lifestyle testers", destruct testing their lives so we don't have to do it for ourselves.

VOlunteer Lifestyle TesterS (VOLTS)

Their experiments help us to discover what we can live without even better than house fires or bombing raids. Their experiments teach us the pitfalls of new technology, just like other early adopters, but without so much money to burn or so much geeky tech skills and savey.

They are modern pioneers, going where no man in his right mind would go, on a five year voyage to write a book or possibly a series of silly human interest articles.

Nietzsche would be proud. He thought that countries should be turned into laboratories to test what kind of men there could be. The US Constitution beat him to the idea, but what the hey, even unto this day, Americans are lab rats running through mazes for the betterment of all mankind.

Maybe by the time that Amazon Prime and Google's Latest New Shiat gets to us, it'll work. As Canadians, we keep telling ourselves that. It sooths the pain and tempers the annoyance.
 
2013-09-02 08:14:18 PM

farkeruk: OtherLittleGuy: CDs were not as ubiquious in 1986. They were still trying to figure how to display them in album stands, and they had these plastic extensions that propped the CD up in view. Some places had reusable extensions, but eventually, they just built and rebuilt displays for CDs only.

I worked in a record shop in 85. We had a CD shelf behind the tills. It was around 88-89 that CDs really started taking off.


You worked in one owned by a technophobe cautious adapter.
CD's came out in Japan in the summer of '82 with a whopping 150 or so titles.  By March of '83 when CD's were sprung on North America there were over 1000 titles, the coverage was similarly exponential that by '85, just about every release* was available in all three dominant formats (even a few straggler forth format 8 tracks).
Either way, in May of '85 the first CD only release was Dire Straits Brothers in Arms. Which, due in no small part to MTV (on cable) and a pretty cool (computer animated) video, went multi-platinum.
By '86, the year our under employed protagonist is pretending to relive, every new album was out on CD (many on other formats too), and they were reissuing back catalog stuff left and right on CD.

* the 12" singles and remixes were still nearly all vinyl. Yea early/mid 80's DJ's!
 
2013-09-02 08:19:25 PM
Bless you, America, for creating so many a-holes and for figuring out ways to live with them and not to kill them. We owe you a vast debt of ingratitude. How will we ever pay you back?

I know! We will make snarky remarks and tell jokes about you forever.

Really, we are grateful and amazed at all the shiat you put up with. Keep up the good work. Per frustra ad astra or something like that.

Personally, I usually buy the last electronic device with a metal case in the shop just before it becomes totally obsolete, on the theory that that one machine will be the one with all the bugs worked out of it and will last for about 15 years. Once they switch to smaller, lighter cases, it's just commodified junk made by a cheap sub-contractor in the latest developing country to industrialize.

Works well with microwaves, TVS and stuff like that. Computers, not so much. They never really last more than five years even if the bugs are worked out, which they almost never are and never will be. Computers were half-arsed from the beginning. It is unlikely that they will ever go back and fix what was wrong in the first place. We will have to wait for first contact with aliens to try something totally new and bug-free.
 
2013-09-02 08:21:32 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: Look! they even had Windows 8 back in 1986

[i.imgur.com image 368x240]

/watch


I assume it worked -- for them.
 
2013-09-02 08:28:53 PM

kazikian: Also, why not use CD's at least. Cassettes are the worst. Hell, try vinyl. Plenty of house music (that the dad misses) on that.


this.
Sunrise Records (online for the rest of us) has all the new vinyl & they have a b&m store in Kitchener about a half-hour from Blair.
 
2013-09-02 08:34:56 PM

skinink: I don't understand you all who think just because you had a computer back in the 80's or that many brands were being sold, that computing was common. It wasn't like it's trying to made out to be. Even before Windows 95, computers were still an expensive thing. I had a friend tell me that back in the Eighties, a 100MB hard drive upgrade costs $1,000. How could something so expensive be common back then?

Either a lot of you had some nice disposable cash back then or I totally missed things back then. And that's even with Time Magazine calling the PC the Machine of the Year in 1983.


VIC-20
TI-99/4A
C=64
AMIGA
Apple II
Atari 800
Timex-Sinclair
Tandy series
Radio Shack Color Computer
IBM PC 286 SX
IBM PC JR
Coleco ADAM

There were a LOT of computer brands on the market in the 80s. And this isn't even counting regular game consoles like the Atari 2600, Atari 5200, Odyssey2, Intellivision, Vectrex, Colecovision, and Master System.

I was decidedly middle-class. We didn't have cable because we lived in the boonies and they wouldn't bring it out that far, but I did have game consoles (Pong, Atari 2600, etc.) and I had home computers as early as 1984. I was online (AOL, various BBS) in the mid 80s. My first computer with a hard drive was bought in 1989 for $2000 from ABC Warehouse, and prior to that we rocked the floppy drives. I had a crate full of floppies for my C64.

I got my first CD player in 1990, though it was actually a removable CD drive for the TurboGrafx-CD system. It also played CD+G, which the record companies were thinking might be a hit because it allowed them to put music videos (in crude graphics) on the CDs. I still have all my CDs from 1990 onward.

However, I had a friend who had a CD player (a deck on his stereo system) in 1986. He was rich, and it was a gift from his parents. This friend also had cable long before everyone else, but it caught on pretty quickly in the suburbs where he lived.

I wasn't rich, though, and I still managed to have several computers throughout the 80s and I first used the handle you see above sometime around 1985. I was bopping around Usenet by at least 1987, I believe. Possibly earlier.

So no, 1986 wasn't computer-free. It wasn't even uncommon. I think the dolt in TFA is mistaking 1986 for 1976.

/I also composed my first album in 1986 using synthesizers (one owned, one rented) and my computer, before I ever started using MIDI.
//Recorded on an old 8-track board and a dual tape deck.
///No, it didn't survive the 80s, unfortunately.
 
2013-09-02 08:48:43 PM

OtherLittleGuy: CDs were not as ubiquious in 1986. They were still trying to figure how to display them in album stands, and they had these plastic extensions that propped the CD up in view. Some places had reusable extensions, but eventually, they just built and rebuilt displays for CDs only.

I also remember there was such an argument on the Jewel Case design. Good times.


No, that was later. In the mid and late 1980s, CDs were marketed in long-boxes. They faded away in the early 1990s.

www.duranduranstore.com 31.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-09-02 08:52:54 PM
Oh, oops... It wasn't AOL. It was Q-Link (predecessor to AOL).

And Compuserve. Can't forget Compuserve.
 
2013-09-02 09:01:36 PM
Meh. Had an Atari 800xl and a x86 pc with a 10mb hdd iirc in the mid 80s. Most of my friends had commodores or apple IIs, though only one had a CD player.
 
2013-09-02 09:47:04 PM

jjorsett: If he's 26 and "living his life as he did in 1986," then I was unaware that zygotes drove cars and read maps.


Well, even ignoring the zygote bit, at least he can sleep around without having to worry about AIDS.

/Herpes, on the other hand ....
 
2013-09-02 09:51:53 PM

brantgoose: Amazon Prime and Google's Latest New Shiat gets to us,


Naw, they are already wrecking Prime by having a crappy movie selection and listing many items as 'Add-On' only.
 
2013-09-02 09:59:14 PM

sno man: f
Either way, in May of '85 the first CD only release was Dire Straits Brothers in Arms.


i.ebayimg.com
 
2013-09-02 10:34:52 PM

Great_Milenko: sno man: f
Either way, in May of '85 the first CD only release was Dire Straits Brothers in Arms.

[i.ebayimg.com image 300x225]


Fine... How about first CD to sell platinum in that format? or the song Brothers in Arms being the first CD single?  One of the first albums recorded digitally? or why the hell would you buy the cassette unless you had a walkman?

from the wiki:
Brothers in Arms was one of the first albums to be directed at the CD market, and was a full digital recording 'DDD' at a time when most popular music was recorded on analog equipment. It was also released on vinyl and cassette.
Brothers in Arms was the first album to sell one million copies in the CD format and to outsell its LP version.
 
2013-09-03 12:05:49 AM

sno man: farkeruk: OtherLittleGuy: CDs were not as ubiquious in 1986. They were still trying to figure how to display them in album stands, and they had these plastic extensions that propped the CD up in view. Some places had reusable extensions, but eventually, they just built and rebuilt displays for CDs only.

I worked in a record shop in 85. We had a CD shelf behind the tills. It was around 88-89 that CDs really started taking off.

You worked in one owned by a technophobe cautious adapter.
CD's came out in Japan in the summer of '82 with a whopping 150 or so titles.  By March of '83 when CD's were sprung on North America there were over 1000 titles, the coverage was similarly exponential that by '85, just about every release* was available in all three dominant formats (even a few straggler forth format 8 tracks).
Either way, in May of '85 the first CD only release was Dire Straits Brothers in Arms. Which, due in no small part to MTV (on cable) and a pretty cool (computer animated) video, went multi-platinum.
By '86, the year our under employed protagonist is pretending to relive, every new album was out on CD (many on other formats too), and they were reissuing back catalog stuff left and right on CD.

* the 12" singles and remixes were still nearly all vinyl. Yea early/mid 80's DJ's!


Yes, by 1986 everything was coming out on CD. However, if newspaper ads from the time are any guide, CD players were not exactly "ubiquitous" - stereo systems were routinely sold without them, and as an add-on full-width single-disc device they cost on the order of $200-$300. CD players were still in early-adopter stage in 1986, not something the hoi polloi was quite ready for. They were extremely scarce in cars until the '90s - I had an '89 Buick Riviera for a while, which was a high end $25K luxury car when it was new, and a CD player wasn't even available for it.

I recall that the mass market tended to get their first CD player sometime around 1990 or so.
 
2013-09-03 12:32:25 AM
I graduated high school in 86. We got cable in 1980. I got a timex sinclair in 1982 and followed it up in 1983 with a commodore 64. I remember saving up for the 1541 floppy drive. I still have the 1702 color monitor. It worked great until everything went digital and HD. No CDs, pagers or cell phones but we did have a coffee machine.

oh and ...

i.imgur.com

which was 1984
 
2013-09-03 12:44:46 AM
Their house has banned any technology post-1986

If this also means banning any current music, then I'm all for it.
 
2013-09-03 02:38:08 AM
According to this, only 15% of American households had a computer in 1990.  Now shut up about how common computers were in the '80s.
 
2013-09-03 03:53:43 AM
Let's see...

In 1986, we definitely had cable, because I watched Nickelodeon all the time.  You know, when it was good shiat, like Loony Tunes all the time and You Can't Do That On Television.

We definitely had a CD player, or at least had one within 1-2 years.  Still used a lot of cassettes and LPs because that's what a lot of the music collection was, but we were starting with the CDs.

We absolutely had a Commodore 64, WITH the 5.25" disk drive thankyouverymuch.  We didn't QUITE have an IBM PC yet, my uncle sent us his old one (the classic one with the dual floppies and everything) in '88 or so.  I remember my dad using a modem on a borrowed work PC sometime in '88 or '89 or so.  NO consoles only because my parents didn't believe in anything without educational value.  Friends would have NESes within 1-2 years, but I sure played plenty of video games on the C64.

Drip coffee maker, obviously.  No fancy espresso machine but hell, those aren't new technology, just a current fad.

We steadfastly refused carphones or cell phones for more than a decade longer, though.

So yeah, this guy's being a douche.  If you want your kid to play outside, limit them to 3 hours of non-educational TV + computer time per day and don't buy a $600 tablet, buy $100 in outdoor toys and a bicycle.
 
2013-09-03 04:13:59 AM
In 1986 I had gotten, or was in the process of getting, a new CD player for my Adcom stereo. I was living completely without a TV at that point and would do so for several more years.

However, in 1987, at least for the first four months, I was able to work from home via computer. So there's that.

I applaud this family and their efforts.
 
2013-09-03 04:52:09 AM
First world problem
 
2013-09-03 07:01:46 AM

Gunther: barefoot in the head: Did anyone mention that they are happy?

Well, they're hardly going to go to all this effort then give an interview to a media outlet and say "It farking sucks!", are they?

People who make decisions with large financial or opportunity costs tend to suffer from "post-purchase rationalization" afterwards - they'll put a lot of effort into convincing both themselves and others that they made the right decision.


The fact that they actually communicate has brought them closer, but don't let the facts stop a good rant.
 
2013-09-03 08:00:41 AM

HindiDiscoMonster: The fact that they actually communicate has brought them closer


Because as we all know, communication is simply not possible in this day and age.
 
2013-09-03 08:18:51 AM

Gunther: HindiDiscoMonster: The fact that they actually communicate has brought them closer

Because as we all know, communication is simply not possible in this day and age.


That's the part I don't get. Some people seem to think that it's impossible to prevent technology from ruling your life. In reality, that is something you ALLOW to happen through the decisions that you make.

I graduated high school in the same year that these people were born, and I'm quite happy to continue living my life with modern technology. It improves my life. It doesn't rule my life, because I don't allow it to.
 
2013-09-03 09:37:01 AM

Cybernetic: Gunther: HindiDiscoMonster: The fact that they actually communicate has brought them closer

Because as we all know, communication is simply not possible in this day and age.

That's the part I don't get. Some people seem to think that it's impossible to prevent technology from ruling your life. In reality, that is something you ALLOW to happen through the decisions that you make.

I graduated high school in the same year that these people were born, and I'm quite happy to continue living my life with modern technology. It improves my life. It doesn't rule my life, because I don't allow it to.


Did you read last week about the attempt to charge the SENDER of a text message because the receiver was driving and got into an accident? Apparently the court system in the US (and this was applauded by my provincial government in Canada so them too) does think it's impossible for us to make choices.  Personally if I was defending that poor girl I'd get a paralegal to text message the prosecutor constantly during the trial.  Proving that is it possible to ignore your phone when it is not appropriate to answer it.
 
2013-09-03 10:35:03 AM

Obbi: a dude with some mad nostalgic delusions over the 80's,


This motherfarker was 3 and change when he left the 80s.  He probably has two lasting memories about the 80s, if that.
 
2013-09-03 01:01:07 PM
We had a computer in the very early 1980s. By the age of 5, I was messing around "programming" it in basic. It was a Zenith of some sort. Ah, the refreshing sound of a dot matrix printer. By 1986, We had an Atari, too.

In college, my parents used computers that took up an entire room and the "disks" were cards with holes in them.

Maybe all of the above was because both parents were hard science majors (Mom=Physics/biology/math, Dad=Chemistry/biology)? Computers have always been important to my family.
 
2013-09-03 01:49:15 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: As a Farker YOUNGER than the tard in the article, I want to kick him square in the nuts. My generation is stupid enough as it is, we don't need any more help!


I'm one year older, born in '86.

I'll hold him down for you.
 
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