Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NPR)   Pastor preaching against vaccinations at megachurch, which is now the site of a measles outbreak: "So I'm going to tell you what the facts are and the facts are the facts but then we know the truth, that always overcomes facts"   (npr.org) divider line 354
    More: Followup, Weekend Edition Sunday, vaccinations, outbreaks, measles, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, MMR vaccine, sermons, truth  
•       •       •

14995 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Sep 2013 at 1:04 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



354 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-01 08:05:45 PM  
I wish some really clever lawyer could figure out how to sue this rancid coont, and her un-Christian clubhouse, out of business forever.
 
2013-09-01 08:11:05 PM  

Apik0r0s: I wish some really clever lawyer could figure out how to sue this rancid coont, and her un-Christian clubhouse, out of business forever.


Why is class action only for fun?
We have a whole lot of injured persons here.
We don't need no farkin' politician.
Come on, all we need is a John Grisham fan with a license to sic 'em.
 
2013-09-01 08:16:28 PM  
Isn't intentionally giving false medical information with the intent to harm them or someone they know via the false information given a crime?
 
2013-09-01 08:23:54 PM  

milkyshirt: fark you, you stupid, mouth breathing, moronic, yearning-for-the-dark-ages dipshiat. Seriously. I hope you die from a horrific disease.

Now that I've let off some steam, I'd like to note that I first read Dr. Jason Terk's name as Dr. Jason Twerk. *shakes fist at media*


In this case it's definitely NOT "Nobody's business but the TERK'S"

I wonder if he would have hired Mary Mallion as a cook?

http://history1900s.about.com/od/1900s/a/typhoidmary.htm
 
2013-09-01 08:54:03 PM  
Great Porn Dragon: I am actually a bit of an apatheist now, in part because I sincerely do believe that if the Abrahamic Deity actually GAVE a literal goddamn about humanity that "prosperity gospel" hucksters would be among the first against the wall (along with religionationalist terrorists like Al Quaida and the Army of God).  Because Prosperity Gospel Farking Kills.

I used to be a regular attendee at the local Apatheist church, but one day I stopped going because I realized I just didn't care anymore.
 
2013-09-01 08:59:23 PM  
God could be just farking with the Churcholes.
 
2013-09-01 09:03:19 PM  

Tigger: Ideas as stupid as these eventually eliminate the individuals who support them. It just takes too farking long.


Sadly, I have a father inlaw who believes in all this BS and has a son with serious medical issues, and the father believes that Jesus or God or whatever will fix whatever problems his son has and he hasn't brought him to a doctor yet.  It's pathetic and the biggest reason why I will never talk to him until he's on his deathbed.  Idiot's like these also impact the people around them too, if it was just him, I could care less.

/I will be dancing on his grave and he knows it.
 
drp
2013-09-01 09:09:32 PM  

jayphat: I'd like to point out the Anthrax vaccine is not nearly as effective as you would believe. If memory serves correct from when both my brothers got vaccinated in the Army, you still have a 6 in 7 chance of getting Anthrax.


That's not quite right.

The anthrax vaccine is very effective against what it was developed to do:  protect veterinarians and livestock workers from cutaneous infections caused by exposure to spores in soil.

There is some question as to whether it is effective for the DOD's purpose - to protect people from inhalational infections caused by airborne exposure to weaponized strains.  Obviously this is something that is more or less impossible to test or collect data on, particularly human data.

That "6 in 7" failure rate is about 99% likely to be a fabricated statistic.

Around 2004 when the military's anthrax vaccination program was tied up in the courts, servicemembers had the option of refusing the anthrax vaccine.  (That's something pretty extraordinary for the military.)  At the time, I chose not to get the vaccine, prior to deploying to the middle east.

For you antivax retards, this is what a rational decision to decline a vaccine looks like.  Refusing vaccines because some religious leader said so, or because b-b-b-b-b-but pharmaceutical companies just marks you a fool.  Unwind the tinfoil.  Pediatricians aren't getting pharma kickbacks.  Hell, drug reps don't even bring sandwiches to the hospital any more.
 
2013-09-01 09:16:45 PM  

drp: jayphat: I'd like to point out the Anthrax vaccine is not nearly as effective as you would believe. If memory serves correct from when both my brothers got vaccinated in the Army, you still have a 6 in 7 chance of getting Anthrax.

That's not quite right.

The anthrax vaccine is very effective against what it was developed to do:  protect veterinarians and livestock workers from cutaneous infections caused by exposure to spores in soil.

There is some question as to whether it is effective for the DOD's purpose - to protect people from inhalational infections caused by airborne exposure to weaponized strains.  Obviously this is something that is more or less impossible to test or collect data on, particularly human data.

That "6 in 7" failure rate is about 99% likely to be a fabricated statistic.

Around 2004 when the military's anthrax vaccination program was tied up in the courts, servicemembers had the option of refusing the anthrax vaccine.  (That's something pretty extraordinary for the military.)  At the time, I chose not to get the vaccine, prior to deploying to the middle east.

For you antivax retards, this is what a rational decision to decline a vaccine looks like.  Refusing vaccines because some religious leader said so, or because b-b-b-b-b-but pharmaceutical companies just marks you a fool.  Unwind the tinfoil.  Pediatricians aren't getting pharma kickbacks.  Hell, drug reps don't even bring sandwiches to the hospital any more.


Both my brothers got theirs. The younger described it as the sickest 4 days of his life.
 
2013-09-01 09:18:00 PM  

gja: You assume, and like to generalize in the extreme. So your dismissive attitude shows your lack of cognitive ability where something does not fit neatly into your preconceived hole and molds.
I have had this discussion in numerous other threads. One can be a Christian person without wholesale and blind belief in the 'organized' religion of it.

Don't assume that I will just leave you be on this. You have asserted I have a mental illness. That is both asinine and offensive on many levels.


No one said anything about the "organized religion" being the reason for calling religious people delusional. While "mental illness" MAY  be a bit strong religious people are DEFINITLY delusional. If you claim to be a christian, and you did, you must hold beliefs that contradict reality and you draw those beliefs from a single self contradictory book. Reading the book should be enough to show you that anyone who calls themselves "christian" is at least mildly delusional. And yes I would say the same thing about ALL religions.
 
2013-09-01 09:21:04 PM  

SuperNinjaToad: Benevolent Misanthrope: Earlier this week crowds flooded in for regular services. Rose Mwangi had her Bible in hand, and said she's not worried.
 

"Because I know Jesus is a healer, so I know he's covered us with the blood," Mwangi says. "There's no place for fear."

"The concerns we have had are primarily with very young children who have family history of autism and with bundling too many immunizations at one time," she [the pastor] said.
 

"You don't take the word of the guy that's trying to give the shot about what's good and what isn't," he [pastor's father, noted nutbag Kenneth Copland] said.

And Christians wonder why the rest of us think of them as a bunch of servile f*ckwits.

paint with a broad strokes much? there are literally tens of millions of Christians in the US but yeah one fringe group in Texas represents all of them.


A group with millions of members and a ministry that spans 190 countries, does not make a fringe group. He also has massive ties to other groups, Oral Roberts university, and massive control over a number of politicians.

Saying they are a fringe group is a bit understating one of the most powerful evangelical groups in the US and the damage they have caused.
 
2013-09-01 09:22:01 PM  
Sure, you can raise your kids how you want, but when it seriously harms them, then you should be charged with child abuse and be forced to take responsibility for your irresponsible behavior.
 
2013-09-01 09:24:28 PM  

Kumana Wanalaia: God is a part of us. It is not a magic sky wizard, it is an aspect of the mind.

People said this thousands of years ago and this is the age where we will prove it.


If you mean "a figment of the collective imagination", then , sure.
 
drp
2013-09-01 09:26:50 PM  

jayphat: Both my brothers got theirs. The younger described it as the sickest 4 days of his life.


Years later when the court challenges were resolved, and the anthrax vaccine was again mandatory for people deploying, I had to get it.

It sucked.  Like getting hit in the arm with a baseball bat followed by a 2-3 day constant mild hangover.

I would've turned it down again, if I'd had the option.
 
2013-09-01 09:35:08 PM  

Fuggin Bizzy: "You don't take the word of the guy that's trying to give the shot about what's good and what isn't," he said.

The, uh, doctor? (I know doctors normally don't actually give shots...shut up.) I guess he is one of the smart people, which would put him on the "other" side, according to Rick "Foamy" Santorum. You don't want to just take the word of a guy on the other side. Our ignorance is at least as good as his knowledge.

MY EYES ARE WIDE OPEN...SHEEPLE. Yours should be too.


imgs.xkcd.com
Big mistake.
 
2013-09-01 09:53:58 PM  
I had the measles vaccine as a baby. I got the measles in 4th grade.  I got mumps in 5th grade.  I had scarlet fever in 6th grade.  I have the immune system of a carrot.  I catch everything.  If I were to have children, they would all be vaccinated against everything.  I am thankful I had the polio vaccine or I probably would have caught that when I was in Kenya.  Caught enough stuff there for the airline to want to make a detour to Greenland to get me to a hospital.

Don't lump all Christians with these douchebags.  This Sunday our pastor reminded people to get their kids vaccinated.

It is like this story:

A man was in a flood and had climbed onto his roof for safety.  A man in a boat came along and offered him a ride to safety.  The man said No, God will save me.  Awhile longer a larger boat came and the people offered to take him to safety.  No, he said, God will rescue me.  Awhile longer a helicopter came overhead, as the water were rising.  Let us help you.  They called.  No, the man said, God will save me.
The man drowned in the waters.
In heaven he asked God why he didn't save him.
God looked at the man and sighed, I sent two boats and a helicopter, what more do you want.

Moral: Trust in God, but use common sense.
 
2013-09-01 10:19:53 PM  
Someday, my grandkids will be amazed that people like this were not institutionalized. Or fixed by nanobots or whatever.
 
2013-09-01 10:56:15 PM  

Fuggin Bizzy: The best remedy for a weasles outbreak is lots of .22s and poison.


No, no, boots.   Put down your gun, it's Weasel Stomping Day.
 
2013-09-01 11:05:45 PM  
Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: My post didn't insinuate that I was being persecuted at all. I pointed out how people treat two groups with the same opinion differently, and you apparently assumed I belonged to one of those groups.

That's true, if by "pointed out " you mean "made up a bald-faced, transparent lie."
 
2013-09-01 11:20:20 PM  

vpb: Tigger: Ideas as stupid as these eventually eliminate the individuals who support them. It just takes too farking long.

There is no natural selection anymore.  Stupidity has become survivable because modern society will provide food and medical treatment.


There is still natural selection.  Do you think when apes exhibit social rules it is "unnatural"?  Do you think conceptual evolution is not also evolution?  What kind of magic could alter the evolutionary process?  You be talking metaphysical things.
 
2013-09-01 11:26:16 PM  

Lachwen: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: My post didn't insinuate that I was being persecuted at all. I pointed out how people treat two groups with the same opinion differently, and you apparently assumed I belonged to one of those groups. Most likely becaus you aren't very bright.

Except that it doesn't matter who's bringing the idiotic anti-vaxxer idea forward; whether they're a super-fundamentalist preacher or a super left-wing Hollywood celebrity, if they espouse anti-vax propaganda the only people who take them seriously are those who are already anti-vaxxers.  I see just as much scorn heaped upon Jenny Farking McCarthy as I see directed at this pastor.


Keep in mind you're talking to a Holocaust Denier who has been known to make up lies on other topics as well (even before this thread).  Don't expect much.
 
2013-09-01 11:40:00 PM  
Eagle Mountain is led by pastor Terri Copeland Pearsons, the daughter of televangelist Kenneth Copeland. Church leaders wouldn't grant interviews, but Pearsons released a statement after the outbreak saying she isn't anti-vaccine. But Pearsons added that she still has some reservations about vaccines.
"The concerns we have had are primarily with very young children who have family history of autism and with bundling too many immunizations at one time," she said.


Classic concern trolling.
 
2013-09-01 11:45:47 PM  

Medusa's Daughter: Moral: Trust in God, but use common sense, logic and reason.


You were so close.
 
2013-09-01 11:53:27 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com

300+ posts and no one posts this? Fark I am disappoint.
 
2013-09-01 11:57:32 PM  

Kali-Yuga: gja: Not all of us who identify as Christian are so universally idiotic.

Like all other mental illnesses and defects, religious belief has a spectrum of severity. You might think you lie on the lower end of the spectrum, like a highly functioning autistic or addict, but you still suffer from the same delusion and irrational beliefs as the full blown fundamentalists.

In fact, I think it's very telling that the fundamentalists are proof for religious faith being a bad thing. if your religion has a problem with its fundamentalists, more than likely it's an issue with the fundamental beliefs and way of thinking your religion promotes.



You foolishly have bought into the myth that being a "fundamentalist" has anything to do with the "fundamentals" of a religion.  It's understandable; the name was chosen to convey that misleading impression.   But, while exactly what the "fundamentals" of Christianity are is a somewhat slippery and subjective question, almost any attempt to define them, even by fundamentalists themselves, will demonstrate ways in which American fundamentalist Christianty departs markedly from these fundamentals.

I'm less certain about fundamentalist varieties of other faiths, but at the least I would urging taking with a grain of salt any claim that "being a fundamentalist X" really has anything to do with the defining characteristics or fundamentals of "X."
 
2013-09-02 12:11:21 AM  

Parthenogenetic: DoctorWhat: I'm sad that no one has photoshopped the picture in TFA to say "Measle Mountain Church".

Meh, don't have to.  The eagle on the right of the banner is flipping the bird to science, modern medicine, and all other libtardo wordly things of that ilk.

[media.npr.org image 850x477]


redsquid: Is that eagle on their banner giving me the finger?



I think the eagle looks like its going to suck itself off. meh.
 
2013-09-02 12:52:10 AM  

minoridiot: Wasn't St. Luke a doctor?


Maybe it was St. Joseph.

ecx.images-amazon.com

Just take 2 and call me in the morning.
 
2013-09-02 12:52:33 AM  

Tigger: Benevolent Misanthrope: Earlier this week crowds flooded in for regular services. Rose Mwangi had her Bible in hand, and said she's not worried.
 

"Because I know Jesus is a healer, so I know he's covered us with the blood," Mwangi says. "There's no place for fear."

"The concerns we have had are primarily with very young children who have family history of autism and with bundling too many immunizations at one time," she [the pastor] said.
 

"You don't take the word of the guy that's trying to give the shot about what's good and what isn't," he [pastor's father, noted nutbag Kenneth Copland] said.

And Christians wonder why the rest of us think of them as a bunch of servile f*ckwits.

Ideas as stupid as these eventually eliminate the individuals who support them. It just takes too farking long.


They also take far too many others with them. All it takes is 'herd immunity' to be broken and we're screwed. These (and other anti-vaxxer) nutters are going to be the cause of the next pandemic I'm guessing.
 
2013-09-02 01:16:41 AM  

nmrsnr: For reference, here's how creators of vaccines were viewed around a century ago:

[farm6.staticflickr.com image 378x560]

It's one of those "it's so effective, people take for granted that it is what's working" phenomena. Like "there's no lead in my water, I guess we don't need a clean water act."


Well, it's one of the problems, if you can get past the "Har har lookit them dum religulous folkses" that seems to go on when this topic comes up. There are plenty of quite smart, non-god-bothering people who really don't understand the need for everyone to keep getting vaccinated against diseases that haven't been seen--as even TFA acknowledges--in America in decades. And after all, nobody gets vaccinated for smallpox any more, right? (Except, unnervingly, soldiers)

So a small part of the issue is that quite honestly, nobody now remembers when kids routinely died of measles or mumps; or when families held their breaths all summer long hoping their kids' runny noses were only colds, and not the onset of polio. And without that immediacy, it becomes much easier to fall for the antivaxxer's message, since one has no personal memory of a sibling dead of measles or a cousin confined to an iron lung.

That could change in another generation.
 
2013-09-02 01:17:02 AM  
It is so hilarious this kind of superstitious nonsense still exists in the developed world. As long as they want to get themselves sick more power to them.
 
2013-09-02 01:18:59 AM  
Say, this reminds me of the joke about the Christian stuck in a flood, did anyone post that yet?
 
2013-09-02 01:49:45 AM  
It really is a shame people have forgotten how awful a lot of these diseases are. It makes me think of this girl who was talking about how her housing application was delayed because she didn't have a meningitis shot. She said "I don't even know what meningitis is, but it must be terrible because they made such a big deal about getting vaccinated." She did reach the conclusion that it would be wise to get the shot, so her biggest problem was just getting the documentation through all the university offices.
 
2013-09-02 01:56:17 AM  
National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program
The VICP is a no-fault alternative to the traditional tort system for resolving vaccine injury claims that provides compensation to people found to be injured by certain vaccines.

Key words ... "no fault"
 
2013-09-02 02:00:57 AM  

Medusa's Daughter: Moral: Trust in God, but use common sense.


The cool thing is, this strategy works even without the first part!
 
2013-09-02 02:26:32 AM  

dumbobruni: ThePastafarian:
Something good happens: "This was the work of God"

Something bad happens: "The Lord works in mysterious ways"

this is why I completely lost my faith, after seeing a family member battle ovarian cancer for 4 years. no one should have to go through that level of suffering, regardless of the final outcome.



 Really? Because I really want to say that too...but then I also have kids. And I work with kids. And I remember being a kid.

 I remember and also see kids getting really really upset over something trivial. Say little Johnny really really wants to go to see a movie being shown. He's been obsessing over the trailers for weeks, he was told they were going to go see the movie that night and... they don't go. For some normal reason (no tragedies). Johnny is crushed. He cries most of the evening in disappointment. 

 As adults, we tell Johnny that we understand he is disappointed, but also that it's nothing to cry over. He will see the movie another time, perhaps tomorrow. Or maybe he'll have to wait til it comes out on DVD. Johnny looks at them with red rimmed eyes and shakes his head "no". He had his heart set on seeing it tonight. He goes to bed still sad. 

 No adult that we know of would ever make a fuss about missing a movie like this. We're far enough back from the problem and aware of other things that it's just not that big of a deal. But kids do it all the time for this sort of trivial thing. And while some of them do it manipulatively, a good portion of them are honestly just that distressed. They are very close to the issue, in their small world it's a really big deal. 

 Now supposing for a second that we were to "back up" from "life" a bit. Can we back ourselves up to a point where normal traumas of humans (friends, family) dying, even horribly, become a similar "disappointing, but not soul crushing in their finality" issue? Putting on a sci-fi hat for a moment, can you imagine a universe beyond physical reality where the horrors of physical realities are reduced to the equivalent of an adult missing a movie versus Johnny? 

 You see, I can.

  And while I have no proof that such a world exists beyond my admittedly very active imagination, by the same token, I have no proof it doesn't. And if such a world does, there is no reason to believe I currently know (nor might it even be possible for me to know) how that world would work and effect me.

 And so, I try to take my trauma with a grain of salt. I acknowledge that tragedies and such are awful and heartbreaking for me. I  make no illusions about that not being the case. And it may very well be that when I die, I simply wink out of existence. 

Then again, I also might just be a universe-sized Johnny. Who's sadness and frustration, however real to me, simply don't stack up in the grand scheme of things. 

/only time will tell for certain.
//in the meantime I do the best I can, and make no illusions that I know "everything/anything" about how the universe/reality actually work.

 
2013-09-02 02:35:46 AM  

Kali-Yuga: gja: Not all of us who identify as Christian are so universally idiotic.

Like all other mental illnesses and defects, religious belief has a spectrum of severity. You might think you lie on the lower end of the spectrum, like a highly functioning autistic or addict, but you still suffer from the same delusion and irrational beliefs as the full blown fundamentalists. 

In fact, I think it's very telling that the fundamentalists are proof for religious faith being a bad thing. if your religion has a problem with its fundamentalists, more than likely it's an issue with the fundamental beliefs and way of thinking your religion promotes.


Except you can make that argument against all of humanity. 

 Humanity, fundamentally has some pretty big issues that arise no matter what sort of situation we put ourselves in (and it's been about as varied as we can make it in recorded history all things considered.)

 If the sole basis of your argument is "Christians have delusions and irrational beliefs", but those two items show up in every other human situation/organization on the planet, it's a human problem. Not a "republican" or "liberal" problem.
 
2013-09-02 03:04:49 AM  

psychosis_inducing: It really is a shame people have forgotten how awful a lot of these diseases are. It makes me think of this girl who was talking about how her housing application was delayed because she didn't have a meningitis shot. She said "I don't even know what meningitis is, but it must be terrible because they made such a big deal about getting vaccinated." She did reach the conclusion that it would be wise to get the shot, so her biggest problem was just getting the documentation through all the university offices.


I think that's key.  My parents lived through the last gasp of polio, so there was never any question we would get vaccinated.  We have a couple of generations now that have never known polio or small pox or measles.  The idea of an epidemic that could kill millions has been relegated to the realm of science fiction, despite the fact that the Spanish Flu did exactly that just a hundred years ago.  It's the curse of success, I guess.
 
2013-09-02 04:11:01 AM  

Mentat: psychosis_inducing: It really is a shame people have forgotten how awful a lot of these diseases are. It makes me think of this girl who was talking about how her housing application was delayed because she didn't have a meningitis shot. She said "I don't even know what meningitis is, but it must be terrible because they made such a big deal about getting vaccinated." She did reach the conclusion that it would be wise to get the shot, so her biggest problem was just getting the documentation through all the university offices.

I think that's key.  My parents lived through the last gasp of polio, so there was never any question we would get vaccinated.  We have a couple of generations now that have never known polio or small pox or measles.  The idea of an epidemic that could kill millions has been relegated to the realm of science fiction, despite the fact that the Spanish Flu did exactly that just a hundred years ago.  It's the curse of success, I guess.


Even today, people think of measles as something that IF kids get it "Oh, doctors can treat that pretty easily"...which they can, up to a certain point. If few enough kids are sick, and the cases aren't too severe. Same with whooping cough. "Oh, kids don't die of whooping cough!" until the last year or two, when they did. Seems like unless it's really weird and exotic--OMG! West Nile! SARS!--people don't pay attention, nevermind the fact that those haven't yet killed large numbers of people. Or something gruesome and hard to catch--OMG! Flesh-eating bacteria!! But like I said, that could change in a couple of generations, we could be back to endemic measles and mumps and epidemic polio if we're not careful.
 
2013-09-02 04:33:40 AM  
cuzsis:

 If the sole basis of your argument is "Christians have delusions and irrational beliefs", but those two items show up in every other human situation/organization on the planet, it's a human problem. Not a "republican" or "liberal" problem.

No it's not the sole argument, everyone has some irrational beliefs, even otherwise intelligent people, that's why they are a few theists with IQ's over 100, man isn't a rational animal, we're exceedingly good at rationalizing things though. Like the examples in this thread of christians trying to rationalize why prayer doesn't work by claiming it was really the god working through a doctor, or inspiring someone to invent a cure, or other such nonsense.

The thing is what while many people have irrational beliefs, not everyone bases their entire way of life or idea of morality on it the way theists do.

The fact, and it is a fact, that religious faith is by definition irrational, isn't the only argument against it, but the kind of flawed thinking and faulty reasoning necessary to be a believer leads to all sorts of other problems, including genocide, misogyny and anti-intellectualism. History furnishes countless examples of what happens when the religious are allowed to hold any sort of real power over the state or government.
 
2013-09-02 04:54:06 AM  
The article leaves me with questions. Did the measles virus mutate or something? Because the article said "most of the people infected did not have their vaccinations." That implies some of them did. If they still ended up with measles, does that imply the vaccination is not 100% effective or that measles is mutating. What exactly is the implication?
 
2013-09-02 09:01:26 AM  

Ruiizu: does that imply the vaccination is not 100%


Vaccines are not 100% for various reasons.

This is where herd immunity would have protected those still vulnerable ... but incredibly stupid people decided to put their children and other vulnerable people at risk.
 
2013-09-02 09:19:14 AM  
Why don't they think the vaccines are the result of their god's good works? Do they eschew the transistor and the electric light as well? If any technology worked against the wishes of the OT god, I think it would be the electric light. And don't get me started on "daylight savings," aka Satan's Wristwatch.
 
2013-09-02 09:45:37 AM  

mofa: Why don't they think the vaccines are the result of their god's good works? Do they eschew the transistor and the electric light as well? If any technology worked against the wishes of the OT god, I think it would be the electric light. And don't get me started on "daylight savings," aka Satan's Wristwatch.


Satan designed the Easy Cut Dispenser for Glad.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glad_%28company%29
 
gja
2013-09-02 09:45:42 AM  

Kali-Yuga: cuzsis:

 If the sole basis of your argument is "Christians have delusions and irrational beliefs", but those two items show up in every other human situation/organization on the planet, it's a human problem. Not a "republican" or "liberal" problem.

No it's not the sole argument, everyone has some irrational beliefs, even otherwise intelligent people, that's why they are a few theists with IQ's over 100, man isn't a rational animal, we're exceedingly good at rationalizing things though. Like the examples in this thread of christians trying to rationalize why prayer doesn't work by claiming it was really the god working through a doctor, or inspiring someone to invent a cure, or other such nonsense.

The thing is what while many people have irrational beliefs, not everyone bases their entire way of life or idea of morality on it the way theists do.

The fact, and it is a fact, that religious faith is by definition irrational, isn't the only argument against it, but the kind of flawed thinking and faulty reasoning necessary to be a believer leads to all sorts of other problems, including genocide, misogyny and anti-intellectualism. History furnishes countless examples of what happens when the religious are allowed to hold any sort of real power over the state or government.


Let me clear this up for you since you seem to have such an absolute black/white view of things as it pertains to certain aspects of life (which in itself is a bit disordered in of itself).
I identify as a man who most strongly leans toward Christian beliefs. That is: the teachings of the man who is thought to be Jesus.
There is no room in my life for the churches or the organized lot (such as they are) who have usurped them for their own uses.
Neither do I have anything but skepticism for any and all versions of bible/kuran/torah ec....
They are books written by men who claim to know what was said in a language they could not possible be fluent in, in a time their lineage was not a twinkle in their predecessors eyes. Rubbish, stuff and nonsense.

You are tremendously prejudiced in your approach to certain things. Your mind rolls down a veritable metal gate in it's closeness at the mere word 'christian'.
This is NOT a balanced manner nor the mark of intelligent discussion.

Kali-Yuga: that's why they are a few theists with IQ's over 100


Perhaps if I cared about what, or who, a theist really is I might give a damn. But here you get into territory of troubling waters if you think I am some dullard with a base mind. I will not post my Stanford ranking but suffice to say that I occupy an area less than 1 in 15mm people. For whatever a cognitive function test has to do with all of this. This discussion is in the arena of human behavior and system of values.

I find it no incongruous that your chosen moniker is a religious tag. One would wonder why another might do so. That is a bit vexing.

BTW, I am an engineer (EE, ME) with areas of study in light, near-light, laser and RF transmission. I am also an I.T. professional of some 25 years now.
My leaning towards an ordered an logical approach to life has some modifiers where people are concerned as to be a compassionate and human person in my dealing with my fellow man trumps my desire to have everything just as I wish it in my life. That is the decent way for a real human to be. One must realize one cannot go about saying and doing that which is unfeeling and unkind and expect to get back anything else. To expect others to treat you well while you act poorly is a characteristic of an immature and petulant child.

Maybe, just maybe, one can identify with Christian teachings, yet no be labeled 'religious' or 'faithful'. Maybe one CAN be both intellectually grounded and yet ponder that perhaps there are things we humans have not yet conquered and brought to light for examination. Stop trying to inextricably bind RELIGIOUS and FAITH together. They are separate concepts, sometimes.
 
2013-09-02 09:49:16 AM  

gja: Your mind rolls down a veritable metal gate in it's closeness at the mere word 'christian'.


Could you open your mind to the correct usage of the apostrophe? And your other language tortures?
 
gja
2013-09-02 09:50:04 AM  

Kali-Yuga: your religion


MY religion....humorous. You know little to nothing of me yet you are happy to prejudge me based merely on my identifying with the teaching of a man who was thought to do much good in his life.

Open your mind, it's getting dusty in there old boy.
 
gja
2013-09-02 09:51:06 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: gja: Your mind rolls down a veritable metal gate in it's closeness at the mere word 'christian'.

Could you open your mind to the correct usage of the apostrophe? And your other language tortures?


YOU try this an a smarty-phone!!! I want to torture the UI designer.
 
gja
2013-09-02 09:54:28 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: gja: Your mind rolls down a veritable metal gate in it's closeness at the mere word 'christian'.

Could you open your mind to the correct usage of the apostrophe? And your other language tortures?


Please feel free to be a grammar cop. Expect me to not worry about such things as this is not an answer to an RFQ or RFP nor a thesis.
 
2013-09-02 10:32:48 AM  

gja: I will not post my Stanford ranking but suffice to say that I occupy an area less than 1 in 15mm people.


Sorry, I am not familiar with "Stanford rankings". Are they measured in millimeters?

P.S. If you just want to follow 'moral' teachings they are available from non-magical sources.
 
gja
2013-09-02 11:09:35 AM  

Farking Canuck: gja: I will not post my Stanford ranking but suffice to say that I occupy an area less than 1 in 15mm people.

Sorry, I am not familiar with "Stanford rankings". Are they measured in millimeters?

P.S. If you just want to follow 'moral' teachings they are available from non-magical sources.


Stanford-Binet tests as ranked 1/x of population. I think you knew that, but chose instead to be snarky or obtuse. I have also been given Wechsler tests.

Morality and humane behavior, from whatever source, should be a welcome thing in this world. We should not be discouraging it merely because of an affiliation.
 
Displayed 50 of 354 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report